Questions on starting new colony.

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dlynn

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Newbie here. Just got my first rabbits one week ago. A trio of silver fox. Want to try a colony. The book I bought on colony raising said start them together young. They are currently in a tractor type set up as I build my larger shed and run. It is roughly 4x10, has an insulated box at one end, 3 den boxes 12 x20, wire covered run, extra shelves to climb and rest on. They came from a breeder that used individual cages. Seemed to adapt well, and looked happy in their new space. The 2 does are now 9 weeks. The buck is now 12 weeks. This week he has become relentless constantly trying to hump the does. They don't seem to respond, ( but I can't always see them) have places to hide. I hate to put him in a cage alone. Is there a danger he will actually succeed while they are still too young? Do I have to remove him just to give the girls some peace? Will they accept him back into group living months later? Please help! I want the colony idea to succeed.
 

MnCanary

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Colony-raising rabbits seems to be a lot easier if the buck is kept separate. Does from the colony can be brought to the buck as needed, then returned to the colony. In a colony with mixed genders, the doe could have a litter every 4 weeks until she just wears out and dies. Keeping the buck separate allows you to give does some time between litters, which should pay off with healthier does and thus healthier kits.
 

dlynn

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Colony-raising rabbits seems to be a lot easier if the buck is kept separate. Does from the colony can be brought to the buck as needed, then returned to the colony. In a colony with mixed genders, the doe could have a litter every 4 weeks until she just wears out and dies. Keeping the buck separate allows you to give does some time between litters, which should pay off with healthier does and thus healthier kits.
Do I have a little time to get him out or does he need to be removed NOW!
 

dlynn

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Colony-raising rabbits seems to be a lot easier if the buck is kept separate. Does from the colony can be brought to the buck as needed, then returned to the colony. In a colony with mixed genders, the doe could have a litter every 4 weeks until she just wears out and dies. Keeping the buck separate allows you to give does some time between litters, which should pay off with healthier does and thus healthier kits.
Thanks for your time. The young horny toad is in a small cage by himself. Put it next to so they can see each other. 1/4" hardware cloth between. Hopefully it won't take long to do the shed. Then he can have the big tractor. Momma's and kits the shed. I swear he's pissed. Glared at me a long time before he would take the treats offered. And he wouldn't take them from me as he had been. How long do they hold a grudge?
 
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