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urbanfarmgirl

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Hi everyone! Glad to have found this forum. I'm new to raising rabbits - right now we have a litter of ten that are about 8 weeks old. Unfortunately, the male of our breeding pair turns out to have bad teeth that no amount of amateur dentistry has been able to fix, so we will be dispatching him this weekend and looking for a new buck soon. Looking forward to learning from everyone and sharing our experiences, too.
 

HTAcres

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Hi everyone! Glad to have found this forum. I'm new to raising rabbits - right now we have a litter of ten that are about 8 weeks old. Unfortunately, the male of our breeding pair turns out to have bad teeth that no amount of amateur dentistry has been able to fix, so we will be dispatching him this weekend and looking for a new buck soon. Looking forward to learning from everyone and sharing our experiences, too.
Good idea!! You definitely don't want to breed bad teeth.
 

Preitler

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Quite likely, yes, it can be genetic. like other things like splayed legs, split penis, weak immune systems, and whatever. For example look at all the tooth problems of rabbits from "cute" breeds that are not bred responsible but just multiplied for a quick buck on the pet market, leaving the new owners to deal with it when they pop up later on.

There are ways to damage rabbit teeth, like, feeding whole corn kernels can cause issues. I guess malnourishment could cause issues too, and of course accidents can happen.

To not use a rabbit that has any problems (which aren't known to be caused by an accident) is defintly a good idea and responsible thing to do.
 

urbanfarmgirl

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Quite likely, yes, it can be genetic. like other things like splayed legs, split penis, weak immune systems, and whatever. For example look at all the tooth problems of rabbits from "cute" breeds that are not bred responsible but just multiplied for a quick buck on the pet market, leaving the new owners to deal with it when they pop up later on.

There are ways to damage rabbit teeth, like, feeding whole corn kernels can cause issues. I guess malnourishment could cause issues too, and of course accidents can happen.

To not use a rabbit that has any problems (which aren't known to be caused by an accident) is defintly a good idea and responsible thing to do.
Welcome to RabbitTalk. What breed(s) do you have?
We have a rex doe and a silver fox buck - just one breeding pair for our little urban rabbitry!
 
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