Fleabane Daisy

Help Support RabbitTalk:

FluffleFarm

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
65
Reaction score
36
Location
Bradenton, Florida
Anyone know if I can give these to rabbits? If so can I give all of it petals stem leaves etc?

Also, does anyone have a like super knowledgeable post/blog/instagram to follow for natural things like this? Searching the group proved that someone's book didnt cover herbs... so not sure where to go other than "Picture This" app.
 

Attachments

  • C8D5C50F-0393-4E81-B51C-EC933E85F831.jpeg
    C8D5C50F-0393-4E81-B51C-EC933E85F831.jpeg
    160 KB · Views: 6
  • 98FD6EB8-AE05-4318-9861-05C50705F828.png
    98FD6EB8-AE05-4318-9861-05C50705F828.png
    355.2 KB · Views: 6
Last edited:

Cindy in SD

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2022
Messages
64
Reaction score
44
Location
Western South Dakota, USA
You might try stating the name of the plant (preferably the Latin name) and searching "can rabbits eat fleabane daisy". I did, and it came up as a rabbit and deer resistant plant (meaning they don't eat it, which maybe (but not necessarily) means they shouldn't eat it). Sometimes animals can be taught to eat things they wouldn't normally be willing to consume--like teaching cows, sheep, etc. to eat Canada thistle. Apparently it's good for them--high in protein--but they're not generally familiar with it, so they don't eat it. I guess it's not the prickles; it's just that mama cow or sheep didn't eat it.
 

FluffleFarm

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
65
Reaction score
36
Location
Bradenton, Florida
You might try stating the name of the plant (preferably the Latin name) and searching "can rabbits eat fleabane daisy". I did, and it came up as a rabbit and deer resistant plant (meaning they don't eat it, which maybe (but not necessarily) means they shouldn't eat it). Sometimes animals can be taught to eat things they wouldn't normally be willing to consume--like teaching cows, sheep, etc. to eat Canada thistle. Apparently it's good for them--high in protein--but they're not generally familiar with it, so they don't eat it. I guess it's not the prickles; it's just that mama cow or sheep didn't eat it.
I tried that but also found people saying their rabbits loved it so I got lost and that sparked my questions haha

thanks though! I’ll have to keep searching. Just trying to use what I got while I figure out what to grow and where
 

Cindy in SD

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2022
Messages
64
Reaction score
44
Location
Western South Dakota, USA
😂 I'm super good at over complicating things, too.

Honestly, I admit I have a high risk tolerance, but if I had rabbits accustomed to eating fresh foods, I'd probably just give them a fleabane daisy and see whether they like it and see whether they turn into a toad, then try giving them a couple daisies, etc... There's not a lot of food in a fleabane daisy, alas. All the same, every little bit...

There is a book. It's not particularly long or comprehensive but you might try looking up "Beyond the Pellet" on your favorite bookseller's site. I got it for Kindle; I don't remember whether or not it was available in paper.
 

Cindy in SD

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2022
Messages
64
Reaction score
44
Location
Western South Dakota, USA
Oh yes... there's willow in case you didn't already know. Willow isn't as vast a species as asteracea but it's pretty vast all the same. The chances are exceedingly good there's a willow of some kind growing very near you and rabbits are said to adore willow. I live in a pretty dry place but there are willows across the fence on public land. I intend to poach a few branches when my upcoming rabbits are ready to leave their mommies and come home with me. I wish chickens would eat willows...
 

Zee-Man

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
223
Reaction score
277
Location
Delaware, USA
That does not look like the fleabane I know. But what I know is not Erigeron Stigosus Yours does look to be a member of the aster family. I see the link to your source but I would want to know more about the plant than it just looks like...

Over at Eat The Weeds, Green Deane is fond of giving the anagram ITEM.

Identification - you have to get botanical, at least know leaf and stem shapes and textures.

Time of year - Is it the right time of year for it to appear? Giant Hogweed is up before Hemlock which is up before Queen Ann's Lace. But they all look the same depending on growth stage.

Environment - Where is it growing? Many plants want a specific environment. If they are out of it there is some reason. Cattail always wants to grow in the wet. If the environment is dry today, was it in the earlier season? So don't be confused if a plant is growing where it doesn't make sense. On the other hand, if you can't explain why, then it probably isn't the one you think it is.

Method of preparation - For humans this could be cooked, once, twice, soaked in cold or hot water, raw or any number of methods. For rabbits, it is almost in every instance raw.

Once you know what you have then you can check lists. It can still be confusing. There are lots of myths and tales out there to to make thing inaccurate. There is not much real information about rabbits. Mind that rabbits are hind gut creatures like horses and goats. It is good to cross reference their edible food lists too. LOTS of info is out there for horses. When doing research the word "fodder" is a useful search term. "Erigeron Strigosos as fodder" was a pretty informative search.

The fleabane in know is also called mares tail - Conyza Canadensis. It is also a member of the aster family and has a similar flower. BUT, the flowers grow in clusters ( I ) and the plant, when flowering ( T ) is very tall perhaps 3 feet. It is not good for horses since it causes severe runny nose. I don't care for the smell. The smell is irritating just inches from my face.

The good thing about the list we have here (linked above) is that we have all researched the plants fairly well AND they are empirically tested by us. @MaggieJ keeps a good eye on the thread and generally keeps it up to date. So if you determine that your Erigeron plant is good, you should post in that thread too.
 
Last edited:

FluffleFarm

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
65
Reaction score
36
Location
Bradenton, Florida
😂 I'm super good at over complicating things, too.

Honestly, I admit I have a high risk tolerance, but if I had rabbits accustomed to eating fresh foods, I'd probably just give them a fleabane daisy and see whether they like it and see whether they turn into a toad, then try giving them a couple daisies, etc... There's not a lot of food in a fleabane daisy, alas. All the same, every little bit...

There is a book. It's not particularly long or comprehensive but you might try looking up "Beyond the Pellet" on your favorite bookseller's site. I got it for Kindle; I don't remember whether or not it was available in paper.
I have that one too. Haha Ive been trying I swear!!
 

FluffleFarm

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
65
Reaction score
36
Location
Bradenton, Florida
That does not look like the fleabane I know. But what I know is not Erigeron Stigosus Yours does look to be a member of the aster family. I see the link to your source but I would want to know more about the plant than it just looks like...

Over at Eat The Weeds, Green Deane is fond of giving the anagram ITEM.

Identification - you have to get botanical, at least know leaf and stem shapes and textures.

Time of year - Is it the right time of year for it to appear? Giant Hogweed is up before Hemlock which is up before Queen Ann's Lace. But they all look the same depending on growth stage.

Environment - Where is it growing? Many plants want a specific environment. If they are out of it there is some reason. Cattail always wants to grow in the wet. If the environment is dry today, was it in the earlier season? So don't be confused if a plant is growing where it doesn't make sense. On the other hand, if you can't explain why, then it probably isn't the one you think it is.

Method of preparation - For humans this could be cooked, once, twice, soaked in cold or hot water, raw or any number of methods. For rabbits, it is almost in every instance raw.

Once you know what you have then you can check lists. It can still be confusing. There are lots of myths and tales out there to to make thing inaccurate. There is not much real information about rabbits. Mind that rabbits are hind gut creatures like horses and goats. It is good to cross reference their edible food lists too. LOTS of info is out there for horses. When doing research the word "fodder" is a useful search term. "Erigeron Strigosos as fodder" was a pretty informative search.

The fleabane in know is also called mares tail - Conyza Canadensis. It is also a member of the aster family and has a similar flower. BUT, the flowers grow in clusters ( I ) and the plant, when flowering ( T ) is very tall perhaps 3 feet. It is not good for horses since it causes severe runny nose. I don't care for the smell. The smell is irritating just inches from my face.

The good thing about the list we have here (linked above) is that we have all researched the plants fairly well AND they are empirically tested by us. @MaggieJ keeps a good eye on the thread and generally keeps it up to date. So if you determine that your Erigeron plant is good, you should post in that thread too.
Thank you!!
This fleabane is all over the property we bought and it’s in an equestrian neighborhood. So I *think* this isn’t the same but it could be!
I’ll have to keep searching and check those things you posted
 
Joined
Mar 9, 2022
Messages
34
Reaction score
51
😂 I'm super good at over complicating things, too.

Honestly, I admit I have a high risk tolerance, but if I had rabbits accustomed to eating fresh foods, I'd probably just give them a fleabane daisy and see whether they like it and see whether they turn into a toad, then try giving them a couple daisies, etc... There's not a lot of food in a fleabane daisy, alas. All the same, every little bit...

There is a book. It's not particularly long or comprehensive but you might try looking up "Beyond the Pellet" on your favorite bookseller's site. I got it for Kindle; I don't remember whether or not it was available in paper.
Yes, beyond the pellet is available in paper. I bought it as part of my trying to learn before getting animals. Easy read lots of info to start with. My gardening with deer book says they eat what mama taught. So being listed as resistant in one area may not hold true in another. And because they nibble lots of things will eat stuff slightly toxic but don't get enough to make them sick. Don't know if this relates to rabbits, but a confined animal doesn't have as many options so feel more responsibility is on us. Feel a large variety is what I'm aiming for. Using beyond the pellet as a start
 

eco2pia

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Messages
1,653
Reaction score
425
Location
western washington
@Zee-Man gives excellent advice above. I will add my Google-fu tricks.

Using the Latin name, add the word "fodder" to the end. A surprising number of plants are traditional starvation animal feeds from years ago, and in the 40s and 50s a number of studies were done to assess their nutrition and sustainability.

Alternatively use "toxicity" with the Latin name. In this case ignore everything that is one person's account of feeding their pet. You are looking for an actual article from a science journal or even Wikipedia site that lists chemicals, and the quantity which is toxic. Oxalic acid is mildly toxic to humans. We shouldn't eat raw rhubarb leaves for that reason. But it's also in spinach. The quantity is so low that it is safe. Dose matters!

Finally, I definitely recommend the just try it method like @Cindy in SD . Give a bunch of their favorites and one tiny bit of a new food. If they ignore it then it's either toxic or yucky. If they eat it wait a few days and offer it again. If they consistently eat it as a small component then I consider it safe and palatable.

Just realize that rabbits vary. I have a buck who won't eat anything but pellets and wood. Literal tree branches, any unprotected hutch wood.... Ignores hay, veggies, garden plants, spends all his time on pasture digging instead of eating. He's definitely an exception.
 

Cindy in SD

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2022
Messages
64
Reaction score
44
Location
Western South Dakota, USA
I think it was called prairie fleabane
The stuff zee-man calls "fleabane" is called horseweed here, considered toxic (but unpalatable) in large amounts and an invasive weed. It just goes to show that the Latin name is handy to use when researching. Common names can vary a lot, depending on where you live (as I'm sure you're aware).

Your fleabane is the same as what we call fleabane daisies. There's no mention in my SDSU regional plant book as to its fodder value nor whether it's toxic. From that I infer that it is not toxic, or at least not enough to notice in cattle (which seems to be what the university is interested in) and likely not particularly nourishing--at least not to cows. Of course cattle are ruminants and rabbits are not, so who knows? 🤷‍♀️
 
Top