Best, Cleanest, Fastest Dispatch?

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alforddm

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I've seen pictures of the Maasai in Africa when they collect blood from cows for drinking. The cows are barely restrained. I have no doubt that such blood letting could be done to death without causing undue stress to the animal. The trick would be a very very sharp knife or an arrow (as the Maasai use). I think very few people now days are capable of sharpening a knife to the required sharpness and you would have to be very accurate. I think a large animal would be much easier than a small one in most cases.

I have never tried this, so just my thoughts on the matter.
 

Zass

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alforddm":1ut9vl4b said:
I've seen pictures of the Maasai in Africa when they collect blood from cows for drinking. The cows are barely restrained. I have no doubt that such blood letting could be done to death without causing undue stress to the animal. The trick would be a very very sharp knife or an arrow (as the Maasai use). I think very few people now days are capable of sharpening a knife to the required sharpness and you would have to be very accurate. I think a large animal would be much easier than a small one in most cases.

I have never tried this, so just my thoughts on the matter.

My husband can sharpen knives past what we think of as a razor's edge. He's had to take his sharpening kit to work to tend his co-worker's pocketknives more than once now. :lol:

I've seen a farmer kill a lamb and then a sheep with a throat cut. He did it very quickly and then held the animals while they bled out, and through the throes. The heart pumps the blood out very very quickly. I think, the animals became light headed and disoriented from blood loss within a few heartbeats, and lost consciousness before they actually died.

It wasn't the worst method of death (better than a poorly placed hunter's bullet, and worlds better than a rabbit would experience dying from gi stasis,) but also not the best.

Despite being comfortable with a variety of dispatch methods, when our own pets had to be put down, it was a well placed and appropriately side bullet to the brain that we chose. (pellet, 22 cal, or heavy shot, depending on the size of the animal.)

Grandma actually had to turn back to this, as she had a hard time with recent veterinary euthanasia. I'm not sure of the specifics, but she describes two injections being given to her old cat, and him reacting extremely poorly to the first one. She said she just didn't have the heart to put her second elderly cat through the same procedure. (They were litter mates, and reached that phase within a few years of each other. )
She tells me that after describing it, she's heard similar stores from people she knows.
 

michaels4gardens

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alforddm":ooxnx5sv said:
I've seen pictures of the Maasai in Africa when they collect blood from cows for drinking. The cows are barely restrained. I have no doubt that such blood letting could be done to death without causing undue stress to the animal. The trick would be a very very sharp knife or an arrow (as the Maasai use). I think very few people now days are capable of sharpening a knife to the required sharpness and you would have to be very accurate. I think a large animal would be much easier than a small one in most cases.

I have never tried this, so just my thoughts on the matter.
I have done this and you are right <br /><br /> __________ Fri Mar 16, 2018 5:31 pm __________ <br /><br />
Zass":ooxnx5sv said:
My husband can sharpen knives past what we think of as a razor's edge. He's had to take his sharpening kit to work to tend his co-worker's pocketknives more than once now. :lol:

I've seen a farmer kill a lamb and then a sheep with a throat cut. He did it very quickly and then held the animals while they bled out, and through the throes. The heart pumps the blood out very very quickly. I think, the animals became light headed and disoriented from blood loss within a few heartbeats, and lost consciousness before they actually died.
.

I have killed with a knife a lot, if properly done it is "almost" painless. - just stupor, then unconsciousness ,it happens almost immediately- but- a "sharp knife" is all important.- The animal will feel a sting- then confusion, then oblivion-- you can see it in their eyes-- they just fall asleep. ... after a few seconds, they will convulse a little and then lie still.
 

Ghost

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I have come up with a fast humane, way that I have used to dispatch guinea pigs that can probably used for smaller rabbits. Perhaps larger rabbits, depending on your upper body strength.

Because guinea pigs have such meaty necks, I wanted to find a way that I feel comfortable with to kill them without bruising the neck meat. I was able try out my new technique by doing a few "test dispatchments" (dead animals were feed to non-fussy eaters). I once tried simply doing a double tap with a box end wrench to the head. My problem is that, in my mind, striking or whacking reminds me of anger or rage. When I dispatch an animal for the propose of obtain meat, I do not want even the hint of rage or anger in my mind. I want be at peace with the idea that, I simply need the creature to be dead to fulfill my needs.

The process I call captive bolt simulator (or longer, penetrating captive bolt simulator), is to cause the same lethal injuries that a penetrating captive bolt causes. There are companies that sell spring-loaded captive bolts used to dispatch smaller creatures. These tend to cost over $100. I got to thinking, it would not really take a lot of force to break through the skull of a smaller creature.

To preform the captive bolt simulator, I simply use a board that is firmly mounted to a structure or the ground and has a spike protruding about a 1/3-1/2 inch long. The spike needs a bit of a point but does not need to be to sharp. I simply lay the unfortunate creature on the board with it's head on the spike. I then place my hands on it's head and thrust in one sudden move. This results of a hole that penetrates the brain. It seems sort of weird, because it feels like I'm crunching through a walnut, but in fact, I am taking an animal's life. I watched a few captive bolt videos to find the best bolt placement. A few seconds after the initial injury, I have used small stick to scramble the brain to hurry death along.

Using the captive bolt simulator death is quite sudden. The creature goes limp in under one second. I can sometimes feel a quaking in the body. In general guinea pigs usually die without the sort of death throws that rabbits have. After 30 seconds or so, they usually release a white fluid from there vent region. There is a bit of blood from the hole and mouth and nose but I would not say that there is an excessive amount of blood.

The first GP I dispatched was small, so I could figure the amount of force I needed. I then worked up to a larger 1.5 pound GP. I have not tried a larger 2 pound GP that I would intend on butchering for my own food. Judging on the size of other GPs, It seems that I have the strength to deliver a quick humane death to a 2 pound guinea pig. If you wish to try the captive bolt simulator on a rabbit, I would suggest you start out with a smaller rabbit to get the feel of how much force it takes before working up to larger rabbits. Also watch a captive bolt video for proper bolt placement.
 

Kent

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I use a piece of 1" x 3" lumber about 2 feet long and place a swift hit between the ears from above while they are calm on a table or the ground makes the process quick and cheap.
 

almiraj

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I use a rabbit wringer and have had a 99.8% fast and humane kill rate on it. I've also had to use it to cull breeding defects in my angoras.

At the class I took on how to process the guy wacked the rabbits in the back of the head with a wood baseball bat. It sounded horrible to me at first, but the rabbits died quickly.

I'm bad as far as kits go... I let nature/god do what it will. One little runt, I was sure wasn't going to make it, and since her mother was sick after birth... I almost decided to end it but something inside me said don't. Well we got mama rabbit better and all of her kits lived (she only had 6). The little runt lived, but only developed one eye, and we figured anyday it would 'not make it'... then the kids named it Pirate because of the missing eye... Well long story short: 3 years later she's the best house/pet rabbit; happy, healthy, vet checked, one-eye survivor.

Also never let the kids name a meat rabbit XD
 

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I've yet to use one, but the best cervical dislocation device I've seen is called the "HopperPopper". It seems to me to be the fastest and most sure way to deal the coup de grace.
 

a7736100

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michaels4gardens":4o5d8mr5 said:
I have killed with a knife a lot, if properly done it is "almost" painless. - just stupor, then unconsciousness ,it happens almost immediately- but- a "sharp knife" is all important.- The animal will feel a sting- then confusion, then oblivion-- you can see it in their eyes-- they just fall asleep. ... after a few seconds, they will convulse a little and then lie still.
How do you hold the rabbit? Does a sharp knife cut through all the fur and throat in one stroke? <br /><br /> __________ Sat Feb 06, 2021 7:40 pm __________ <br /><br /> I migh try this method shown in the video the next time. I'm just afraid I may not be strong enough.
https://www.youtube.com/watch/XOnkVbcYXRQ
 

DoozyWombat

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I've used the captive bolt gun as the fastest and most humane dispatch, but beware: You have to swirl the gun around in a little cone after doing it. Rabbit brains are small, and if you don't hit it exactly right, you will cause a lot of suffering. But if you do the swirling motion, it takes care of the animal instantly.

Specifically, you properly place the bolt on the X between the eyes and the base of the ears, press flat to the skull, then fire and rotate your hand around in a couple of circles before removing the bolt.

Note that rabbits can still have death throes, even when instantly gone. The neck-breaking method (Rabbit Wringer, Hopper Popper) will prevent the leg kicking, but the animal probably lives a minute or two after the neck is broken. One method is neater but probably causes more suffering. The other allows death throes but is an instant dispatch.

Your call. I went with the captive bolt gun from Ballista. I think I got the big one, and paid $56 US for it. I really don't like the death throes, but better I suffer through it than the animal.
 

Sedona

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DoozyWombat":2ofa6his said:
I've used the captive bolt gun as the fastest and most humane dispatch, but beware: You have to swirl the gun around in a little cone after doing it. Rabbit brains are small, and if you don't hit it exactly right, you will cause a lot of suffering. But if you do the swirling motion, it takes care of the animal instantly.

Specifically, you properly place the bolt on the X between the eyes and the base of the ears, press flat to the skull, then fire and rotate your hand around in a couple of circles before removing the bolt.

Note that rabbits can still have death throes, even when instantly gone. The neck-breaking method (Rabbit Wringer, Hopper Popper) will prevent the leg kicking, but the animal probably lives a minute or two after the neck is broken. One method is neater but probably causes more suffering. The other allows death throes but is an instant dispatch.

Your call. I went with the captive bolt gun from Ballista. I think I got the big one, and paid $56 US for it. I really don't like the death throes, but better I suffer through it than the animal.

What makes you say this? I was under the impression that they are gone immediately. This is the method I am wanting to use, but if it's possible they're alive for a few minutes after, I won't be able to stomach it. I have been considering a pellet gun or. 22, but was hoping to avoid the gore of those methods.
 

DoozyWombat

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Sedona":3i1t1z6h said:
DoozyWombat":3i1t1z6h said:
Note that rabbits can still have death throes, even when instantly gone. The neck-breaking method (Rabbit Wringer, Hopper Popper) will prevent the leg kicking, but the animal probably lives a minute or two after the neck is broken. One method is neater but probably causes more suffering. The other allows death throes but is an instant dispatch.

What makes you say this? I was under the impression that they are gone immediately. This is the method I am wanting to use, but if it's possible they're alive for a few minutes after, I won't be able to stomach it. I have been considering a pellet gun or. 22, but was hoping to avoid the gore of those methods.

I don't have scientific evidence, but I think the reasoning is sound. If you break the neck effectively, the hind legs may kick in reflex, but nothing is coming from the brain to affect the body anymore. So it looks like an instant dispatch. Yet the brain is where the animal's awareness resides, such as it is, and it is still full of oxygenated blood. Who knows what a brain goes through in the half minute or minute it takes to starve of oxygen and shut down? Touch an eye or shine a light in it, and you can see the pupil react.

OTOH, the CBG, even though a bit messier, instantly destroys the brain if you use it right. My first time using it, I did not know what I was doing, and it was pretty horrible. Done right, it's like flipping a switch. The animal still kicks, but you can touch an eye and not see a response.

One thing I forgot to mention with the CBG is that you not only have to place it right, you have to aim it back toward the base of the skull. So three things: 1. Place it on the X between the back corners of the eyes and the base of the ears. 2. Aim it toward the base of the skull. 3. Give it a little swirl after firing. Truly instant dispatch with no suffering. I don't like the kicking or the bit of blood that comes out compared to the neck-breaking methods, but I sleep better.
 

a7736100

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Sedona":2768eu51 said:
What makes you say this? I was under the impression that they are gone immediately. This is the method I am wanting to use, but if it's possible they're alive for a few minutes after, I won't be able to stomach it. I have been considering a pellet gun or. 22, but was hoping to avoid the gore of those methods.

I used to have a Winchester .177 pellet break-barrel air rifle. Shooting the back of the head will have the rabbit just instantly drop dead. I've even done it indoors with the rabbit in an iron washtub.
 

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