Best, Cleanest, Fastest Dispatch?

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MaggieJ

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Dwc77":1ozvjsdk said:
I realize that very sick bunnies is heartbreaking for people especially if they are a pet. And I'm not being heartless but I hate for animals to suffer. I feel better knowing I ended there suffering. Maybe dad's grandpa's or friends can help out if it is to hard for someone to do themselves. It is just the sad truth about having animals. Sorry if this seems mean -/-(

Dwc77, this does not sound mean to me at all. Sometimes euthanizing an animal, no matter how much you love it, is the only kindness left to give.
 

Easy Ears

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MaggieJ":3e1r1uc3 said:
Dwc77":3e1r1uc3 said:
I realize that very sick bunnies is heartbreaking for people especially if they are a pet. And I'm not being heartless but I hate for animals to suffer. I feel better knowing I ended there suffering. Maybe dad's grandpa's or friends can help out if it is to hard for someone to do themselves. It is just the sad truth about having animals. Sorry if this seems mean -/-(

Dwc77, this does not sound mean to me at all. Sometimes euthanizing an animal, no matter how much you love it, is the only kindness left to give.

I agree
 

dburton

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I had never dispatched a rabbit before until now. I just used the broomstick method for a very sick rabbit of mine. :cry: I think the first pull wasn't very effective but second one I could feel the neck separate. I doubled checked her neck once done and could feel the separation. Thankfully she didn't struggle nor kick. I think will be getting a wringer for future use.
 

MaggieJ

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A wringer is worth the money if you are dispatching rabbits regularly, but as an emergency method for a sick or injured rabbit, the broomstick works well for most people.

I'm glad you had the resolution to follow through on this, dburton. :goodjob: It's never easy, even for people who raise rabbits for meat, and the first time it can be intimidating.

BTW, welcome to RabbitTalk! :welcome:
 

mferg265

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If have been using cervical dislocation (rabbit wringer self made) to dispatch our meat rabbits for several years now,. I find that bruising along the back and legs is inevitable. the wringer method is difficult for my wife, she is small, to administer to the adult large rabbits when needed. I have created a prototype of a new cervical dislocation device that eliminates both of these problems. Follow the link to a video of how it works (graphic): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ULaJwtigcI
 

MaggieJ

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mferg265":241efou9 said:
I have created a prototype of a new cervical dislocation device that eliminates both of these problems. Follow the link to a video of how it works (graphic): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ULaJwtigcI

I watched the video, mferg265, and it really looks like an excellent device for dispatching rabbits. You should look at patenting/producing them, much as the RabbitWringer people have. Not everyone could build one, but it really would be helpful to many people if it could be purchased.

:thankyou: for posting about it!
 

alforddm

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I watched the video and I'm very impressed. I agree that you should consider patenting it.

Thank you for sharing.
 

HRHDi

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Thanks for all of this info. This is one topic that had me a little more hesitant about starting with meat rabbits vs. fiber rabbits. My husband has told me that he'd do the deed, but I want to be able to do it should the need arise - as it has with a couple of my hens.

I'm leaning toward the "rabbit wringer" option or broomstick.
 

Kariotic

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All ways, guns, pellets, etc show severe pain spikes in brain scans just before death except one, and it's not the one you'd think.Slitting the throat and letting it bleed out. What occurs with this, is no pain spike, and the rabbits don't even seem to be aware that they were cut.they just stand there for a few seconds looking around as if fighting sleep.Then they run around and jump a few times before lying down and sleeping.No screams, no pain coloring in brain scan.
 

AnnClaire

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Kariotic":3jb9byqi said:
All ways, guns, pellets, etc show severe pain spikes in brain scans just before death except one, and it's not the one you'd think.Slitting the throat and letting it bleed out. What occurs with this, is no pain spike, and the rabbits don't even seem to be aware that they were cut.they just stand there for a few seconds looking around as if fighting sleep.Then they run around and jump a few times before lying down and sleeping.No screams, no pain coloring in brain scan.

Citation, please?
 

2CrazyFools

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I'd also like to read the citation when you supply it Kariotic, I had heard that slitting the throats was one of the LEAST humane meathods of dispatch causing more pain than cervical dislocation. However, after you posted yesterday I did some light googling and ended up coming to the conclusion that I really don't know what I thought I did about neck slitting and that you may be right, however I'm not convinced enough at this point to change my current meathod of dispatch. Hence, I am very interested to read the citation you provide when able. :)
 

akane

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I would imagine such a clean cut as to not concern the animal immediately would take an amazingly sharp knife and good aim. The potential for mistake seems high to me. Personally I've never even handled a knife that sharp. I usually have to slice multiple times or apply tension in some way to get enough force to cut through the fat tissue and hit the artery. The animal would be quite distressed. I only use it as a backup to other methods such as cervical dislocation on guinea pigs which can have complications more often due to their pretty much nonexistent necks or when I was using an electric rat trap on smaller rodents for cats since sometimes it only stunned them to unconscious. Mainly that was a problem with hamsters rather than gerbils and mice and I never found a good way to put down the durable hamster except to leave them in a co2 chamber forever. They stun easy and play possum but will recover in a few minutes. Sometimes it's good to cut the throat or remove the head fully afterward as a backup but as the main method personally I know I can't accomplish it to the level it is better than a bullet or cervical dislocation.

While other methods may cause a spike in pain how much is being registered consciously by the animal? There is a difference in pain receptors versus reaching psychological distress. Much like cutting with such a sharp object you don't feel the slice the spike may be so short and efficient the conscious brain fails to recognize it before it can no longer function. Kind of like methods of head trauma. I have been knocked unconscious. Yeah, there's a moment of impact that hurts a lot but it's so fast you are unconscious before you can process it. You can't even really process it as you first come around. Would someone get their finger off the fast forward and pause buttons long enough to explain to me what happened and why does my knee hurt? Oh yeah... I just hit the ground from 5' at 30-40mph... It's not painless but overall as far as death goes if you don't wake back up I wouldn't say it's worse than the chance of problems directly bleeding them out.

Now chemical euthanasia on the other hand shows signs on eeg that the animal feels enough distress it is panicking but can't move so in many cases I would call it less humane even though it doesn't cause pain. The psychological effect is much higher. Unless the animal is rendered unconscious through sedatives or anesthesia first in a way that does not overly upset the animal but this is often not cost effective for places that put down many animals or sometimes not really possible when doing small animals. Not all places are equipped for small animals and I've had some rodents so anemic from fleas we had to inject straight in the heart to stop it. These more physically traumatic methods probably would have been better.
 

GBov

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As I gave my wringer away over a year ago (long story) I had to come up with something else and I really REALLY like my new way.

Wide jaw-ed branch loppers.

Place rabbit on table, pet for a moment or just hold hand over the eyes until the rabbit holds still, open jaws of lopper wide, gently place around neck and close. Very sure of the kill - unlike using the wringer where I use to have to hang on the older rabbits to be sure it was done - and either hold onto the lopper handles until the rabbit stops thrashing about or drop into a bucket. There is no mess other than a little bit of blood so I can do it inside out of the bugs and heat.

No, the head doesn't come off because, as already mentioned, rabbit skin is tough stuff so the blade only nicks the thinnest skin right behind the ears but completely severs the neck bones.

Akane, have you tried hand pruners on your hamsters? They should give you a quick kill, its what we use on quail.
 
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I found that cervical dislocation works well for me. I bought a Hopper Popper, but only use it on the older bucks that take much more force. I do the rest by hand.
That being said, I also found much less nerve response after the rabbit is dead when using cervical dislocation. The rabbits are not as violent with kicking and they stop very quickly in comparison to a pellet gun.
 

wildeden

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We recommend captive bolt guns.
With correct usage and placement, you click the button and the rabbit is instantly dead. There's no loud noise, gore, bruised meat, and the usable portion of the pelt is totally untouched.

Ours don't require cartridges and are easy to clean and maintenance.
Affordable and corrosion resistant.

It's recommended even within the veterinary profession. It is cited on page 35 of AVMA for Guideline for Euthanasia. Click here to read more: https://www.avma.org/KB/Policies/Documents/euthanasia.pdf
 

Thorn

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This is good information on this topic. Ive always used a 22. rifle to the brain, but its loud and stresses the other rabbits, so I've been looking for other options. I tried out the broomstick method on a chicken successfully, still not certain I have the physical strength to do this with a rabbit, but I'm going to try on the next bunch.
 

a7736100

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Does anyone slit their throats with a sharp knife as they do with larger animals?
 

Ghost

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Thorn":cvz0992c said:
This is good information on this topic. Ive always used a 22. rifle to the brain, but its loud and stresses the other rabbits, so I've been looking for other options. I tried out the broomstick method on a chicken successfully, still not certain I have the physical strength to do this with a rabbit, but I'm going to try on the next bunch.

I'm not sure how much upper body strength you have, but it should not require too much. Perform a cervical dislocation with the broom stick is much easier than preforming a bare hand cervical dislocation on a rabbit.

The genius behind the broom stick method is, broom sticking a rabbit actually uses the creatures body as a lever that makes killing it easier. I have dispatched five rabbits using this method. I was amazed at how well the procedure worked, even the first time I did. This was without watching it in person, I only read about it and looked at pictures.

When the rabbit is placed on the ground, the creature's chin is locked in place. The first part of the procedure is to lift-up the legs. When the creature is peacefully lying down the neck is extended close to the limit of nature movement. So is soon as you lift up the legs, you are bending the neck too far in the wrong direction. This takes the most force because lifting the legs will fracture the vertebra and break the tendons that hold the vertebra in place. This is the point where the legs and whole body act as a long lever concentrating your force into the small area at the top of the unfortunate creature's neck. So once the legs are all the way up, you have done the damage against the hardest parts of the rabbit's body. The spinal column itself (the nerve bundle inside the spine) is very fragile, it is a gelatinous mass. In the final part of a broomstick dispatch, you will give a final tug that severs the spinal column, resulting in death. The weakness if the spinal column itself will require only a small force. You may have to fight against a few springy tendons that were not broken, but still not a great force. Just stretch the tendons the spinal column is not stretchy it will break, and the tendons will relax.

Sorry if the description was a bit graphic, but I feel is describes why I fee that broomstick is one of the best humane ways to dispatch a rabbit.
 

Preitler

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a7736100":cglnim1l said:
Does anyone slit their throats with a sharp knife as they do with larger animals?

Hm, here it's unlawful to do so without properly stunning the animal, quite a procedure to do it legal when people insist on halal or kosher meat, I think a vet has to observe every such killing.
 

shazza

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i would not consider throat cut to be a humane or quick death. when slaughtering large animals i want to say they are required to stun the animal first with a captive bolt or electrocution.
 

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