Studies on mortality in Easter Pets (bunnies/chicks)

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ladysown

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So a meme is going around saying that 95% of easter bunnies/chicks die before their first birthday.

I asked a poster about studies that state this.
Her basic response was Google it, it's true.

I've googled.

I can find NOTHING specifically about easter rabbit or chick mortality. I can't even find a generic study about pet bunnies/chicks purchased at anytime dying before their first birthday. Or that all dumped rabbits are easter presents. OR any studies about this whole topic.

Ergo I conclude it's a made up number. Just saying something is so doesn't make it so.

Does anyone know different?
 
Sounds like a made up number. A quick search turned up nothing. Best I could find was a news article about a humane society pleading for people to not get live rabbits for kids for Easter. It said they did a study, I'm guessing for their area, and it showed the average life span of pet rabbits was 4.5 years with the oldest at 14 years. But that's a small sample size I'd think and most people who have rabbits seriously, we aren't dealing with a vet constantly and filling them in on every death and why.
 
I think rehomed inside a year is more likely for that kind of dumping a pet on a child without proper consultation or adult willing to take responsibility for the care of the pet. And yes some will die from bad feeding (and i blame the pet feed care instructions for that in part) along with the stereotype feeds that actually are bad. And also, yes some breeds are more fragile and those are often also the most likely to be chosen as a pet (dwarf, lop ears, fluffy fur). Alle require a bit more knowledge and attention that you cannot expect from a child without a knowing parent to make certain all care is given.
 
Sounds like fake to me. Someone made up a number as a deadbeat argument to push an agenda. Like that "80% of does unspayed does have cancer at 3years". I hate it when this happens, meant well, but imho it is somewhat counterproductive.

Stupid people would think "oh great, so I can buy that rabbit for little precious with no worry about the future", smart ones would see it as a blown out of proportion number, and quite obviously without a base it's meaningless.

Campaigns that point out that animals are long term responsibilities, that rabbits are high maintanance and quite likely not like some influencers portay them, that they are daily chores for more than a decade, that there are costs involved that, depending where you are, can be significant - are imho better.
 
Sounds like fake to me. Someone made up a number as a deadbeat argument to push an agenda. Like that "80% of does unspayed does have cancer at 3years". I hate it when this happens, meant well, but imho it is somewhat counterproductive.

Stupid people would think "oh great, so I can buy that rabbit for little precious with no worry about the future", smart ones would see it as a blown out of proportion number, and quite obviously without a base it's meaningless.

Campaigns that point out that animals are long term responsibilities, that rabbits are high maintanance and quite likely not like some influencers portay them, that they are daily chores for more than a decade, that there are costs involved that, depending where you are, can be significant - are imho better.
i agree and have zero issues with those types of memes.
 
My only experi
So a meme is going around saying that 95% of easter bunnies/chicks die before their first birthday.

I asked a poster about studies that state this.
Her basic response was Google it, it's true.

I've googled.

I can find NOTHING specifically about easter rabbit or chick mortality. I can't even find a generic study about pet bunnies/chicks purchased at anytime dying before their first birthday. Or that all dumped rabbits are easter presents. OR any studies about this whole topic.

Ergo I conclude it's a made up number. Just saying something is so doesn't make it so.

Does anyone know different?
My only experience is a neighbor girl who got a chick in her Easter basket. She had that bird many years. It would wander over and pick at bugs and fallen fruit under our fruit trees. A little gift for the whole neighborhood for a long time. I also knew a little boy who begged for a birthday puppy. After 2 months he didn't want to be bothered with that "toy". And was allowed to neglect it. Any animal can teach responsibility if the people are willing to teach it.
 
Personally, I've not looked to see the actual mortality rate of impulse pets, I just assume it will be high. But then again, I don't have any rabbits for sale until three days AFTER Easter. If they still want them then, they can buy them. But, I try not to sell to the pet market in the first place, those buyers are generally loony. In any case, an English angora (the only breed we have) doesn't make a decent pet due to the excessive coat maintenance. If they want the fiber, then the coat maintenance is not a problem, but as a pet, it's too much work. As a kid's pet, it's a solid "no".
 
Personally, I've not looked to see the actual mortality rate of impulse pets, I just assume it will be high. But then again, I don't have any rabbits for sale until three days AFTER Easter. If they still want them then, they can buy them. But, I try not to sell to the pet market in the first place, those buyers are generally loony. In any case, an English angora (the only breed we have) doesn't make a decent pet due to the excessive coat maintenance. If they want the fiber, then the coat maintenance is not a problem, but as a pet, it's too much work. As a kid's pet, it's a solid "no".
Agreed
 
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