My First Purebred Litter

Rabbit Talk  Forum

Help Support Rabbit Talk Forum:

Buknee

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
Messages
152
Reaction score
180
unless the lines carry blue.... I'd question the blue tort. Just looks like a higher rufus tort to me.

What colours are in the pedigrees?
It does: Harlequinized Castor, Black/Orange Tri, Broken Castor, Blue Otter, Lilac, Blue
 

Buknee

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
Messages
152
Reaction score
180
My purebred litter is now 4 weeks old. Hershey has been an excellent mother. All 6 babies are thriving and super cute.
Here are some more pictures of the kit who's color is in question....20221126_124442.jpg 20221126_124459.jpg 20221126_124535.jpg 20221126_124551.jpg
 

judymac

Well-known member
Rabbit Talk Supporter
Joined
Jun 26, 2022
Messages
120
Reaction score
183
Location
Pennsylvania
I agree, this is definitely a broken tort. Torts (short for tortoiseshell) are non-agouti (aa) self-colored rabbits with the fawn non-extension ee recessive. The orange covers the body, but the black/chocolate (B- or bb) still shows through at the points (nose, ears, feet, tail--the places that are furthest from the body and thus cooler than the rest). Depending on whether the rabbit also has dense color D- or the paler diluted color recessive dd, the points will be either be:
  • Black aa B- C- D- ee
  • Chocolate aa bb C- D- ee
  • Blue aa B- C- dd ee
  • Lilac aa bb C- dd ee
Whenever you see a broken rabbit with a fawn/orange/red/cream body, but the ears and nose are a darker shade, you know you have a broken tort. The next thing to do is to determine what the ear/nose color is. A black tort will have dark gray to black on the ears, blue torts have blue. (lighter gray than black) chocolate torts have medium chocolate brown, and lilac torts have lilac (lighter beige-brown than chocolate). Also, in the dilute colors (blue and lilac), the body color also tends to be paler.

You can see some of these colors at Angora Rabbit Colors and Holland Lop Color Guide — Hickory Ridge Hollands

Black torts often have gray but not full black points, some breeds more so than others. I can see why there is so much debate about this kit, as some photos look chocolate, others black-based, and since the points are not pure black, could be considered blue. I truly can't tell which from here, but it appears the lacing around the ear is indeed black, and I'd guess broken black tort, just a guess. What this rabbit does not appear to be is a tricolor. Tricolor is specifically a broken harlequin. This rabbit only has color on the points, like a tort, not in scattered patches like a harlie. Torts are not the same as harlequins, even though they do both have fawn and color separated on the body. When you see a kit you think might be a tricolor, look for the harlequin pattern in patches other than the points. A broken harlequin is properly called a tricolor, a broken tortoiseshell is simply a broken tort. There's a lot of broken torts out there with 'tricolor' on their pedigree, you have to look close to see where the color patterning is found to see if they truly are a broken harlequin tricolor, or just a broken tort (both of which are lovely, I have both and love them.)

 
Joined
Jun 12, 2022
Messages
201
Reaction score
295
Location
Alaska
I also agree - it's broken red. The excessive scattered white hairs could be just that, excessive scattered white hairs, or there could possibly by some silver in the background. I'd go with scattered white hairs, though, as it's an issue in some lines of brokens.
The pale undercolor is probably just that, too. Reds, as non-extenion castors, can be tricky to get just right. But I love the depth of the rufus factor in this bunny and the lack of smut on the ears and body.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2022
Messages
201
Reaction score
295
Location
Alaska
So she is considered red, not orange?
Rex are classified as red rather than orange, so there's that. Which is not to say you couldn't have an orange rex.
But red is a different color than orange, genetically. An orange is a non-extension chestnut (or castor) <A_B_C_D_ee>, while a red is a non-extension chesnut which additonally carries two wideband genes <A_B_C_D_ee ww> The wideband genes extend the orange middle band, which spreads the color over more of the hairshaft.
I have seen evidence that the wideband gene is not entirely recessive, so a red could have only one. It would probably not be as deep a color, though.
Usually a breed of rabbit is accepted in either red (e.g. rex) or orange (e.g. Netherland Dwarf), but at least one breed, the Holland Lop, is accepted in both varieties.
 

judymac

Well-known member
Rabbit Talk Supporter
Joined
Jun 26, 2022
Messages
120
Reaction score
183
Location
Pennsylvania
I sure wish someone could explain the cause of this 'snowball' effect, where the color is lovely on the outer part of the hairshaft but then goes down to white quickly. The fawn/orange/reds seem to have it the most, but I've also had it in blacks, chocolate, chestnut (castor if you're not an angora) and harlequin. Some have as little of 1/4" of color at the tips, and the rest of the hairshaft white. They call these rabbits with the extreme white band "snowballs". Looks like this rabbit is about half and half, color and white. I assume there is some sort of modifier, but perhaps it is a relic of the 'ee' non-extension, even in non-fawn rabbits? I've had New Zealand Reds without a smidge of white on them, so it's not just that all reds have this issue. Any clues as to why this happens, and how to eliminate it from the herd?
 

Latest posts

Top