Has anyone had doe kindle at night?

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Robochelle

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My last two kindles, both this past week, they had their kits at night instead of the usual dawn.

It's unusual, but probably not unhealthy? My husband thinks that because we keep lights on all the time, we've messed up their circadian rhythm... has anyone ever heard of that? I know it happens In chickens but I'm not sure about rabbits.
 
My last two kindles, both this past week, they had their kits at night instead of the usual dawn.

It's unusual, but probably not unhealthy? My husband thinks that because we keep lights on all the time, we've messed up their circadian rhythm... has anyone ever heard of that? I know it happens In chickens but I'm not sure about rabbits.
My does kindle at all hours of the day. It's always been my impression that it hinges somewhat on changes in barometric pressure.
 
That’s fascinating.
It really is, and I wish I had been keeping track over the years. A rise or drop in pressure doesn't seem to make a doe kindle if she's not ready, but I have noticed that within about a 24-hour window, she's more likely to be earlier or later depending on when the barometer moves. I am a somewhat obsessive record-keeper but even I haven't been formally tracking barometric pressure, haha...though I just might start. :)

I had an interesting exchange with a nurse in a maternity ward in this regard. When I went into labor with one of my children early one January, my husband had to maneuver the car through furiously blowing snow to get to the hospital. When we arrived, they put me in an overflow wing because the ward was full. When I commented on this, the nurse said, "Oh yeah, I've been working here for 20 years, and when storms hit we're always full."

During my time working as a waterfowl biologist, one of the things we documented pretty clearly was the effect of barometric pressure changes on migration timing. Ever since then, I have been more aware of the possibility of pressure changes having effects on other biological processes. As you said, it's fascinating.
 
I had an interesting exchange with a nurse in a maternity ward in this regard. When I went into labor with one of my children early one January, my husband had to maneuver the car through furiously blowing snow to get to the hospital. When we arrived, they put me in an overflow wing because the ward was full. When I commented on this, the nurse said, "Oh yeah, I've been working here for 20 years, and when storms hit we're always full."
Makes sense actually, giving birth attracts predators and both mom and baby are very vulnarable that first period. Bad weather makes everything pretty much hunker down and stay put. Wind also distorts sound and scent, so finding easy prey is difficult and staying hidden is easier.
 
It really is, and I wish I had been keeping track over the years. A rise or drop in pressure doesn't seem to make a doe kindle if she's not ready, but I have noticed that within about a 24-hour window, she's more likely to be earlier or later depending on when the barometer moves. I am a somewhat obsessive record-keeper but even I haven't been formally tracking barometric pressure, haha...though I just might start. :)

I had an interesting exchange with a nurse in a maternity ward in this regard. When I went into labor with one of my children early one January, my husband had to maneuver the car through furiously blowing snow to get to the hospital. When we arrived, they put me in an overflow wing because the ward was full. When I commented on this, the nurse said, "Oh yeah, I've been working here for 20 years, and when storms hit we're always full."

During my time working as a waterfowl biologist, one of the things we documented pretty clearly was the effect of barometric pressure changes on migration timing. Ever since then, I have been more aware of the possibility of pressure changes having effects on other biological processes. As you said, it's fascinating.
It was snowing off and on over the weekend... interesting hypothesis. I'm going to look at my birth records and find out the historical weather from the ones that were early or late.
 
It really is, and I wish I had been keeping track over the years. A rise or drop in pressure doesn't seem to make a doe kindle if she's not ready, but I have noticed that within about a 24-hour window, she's more likely to be earlier or later depending on when the barometer moves. I am a somewhat obsessive record-keeper but even I haven't been formally tracking barometric pressure, haha...though I just might start. :)

I had an interesting exchange with a nurse in a maternity ward in this regard. When I went into labor with one of my children early one January, my husband had to maneuver the car through furiously blowing snow to get to the hospital. When we arrived, they put me in an overflow wing because the ward was full. When I commented on this, the nurse said, "Oh yeah, I've been working here for 20 years, and when storms hit we're always full."

During my time working as a waterfowl biologist, one of the things we documented pretty clearly was the effect of barometric pressure changes on migration timing. Ever since then, I have been more aware of the possibility of pressure changes having effects on other biological processes. As you said, it's fascinating.
Something to track for sure. Had two does kindle right before the storm the other day and I myself had my daughter in a blizzard. There’s definitely something to it!
 
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