Free Online Rabbit Feed Formulation Software

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Obsidian

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http://world-rabbit-science.com/

(Click on "Online-Scientific Documents" on the side bar)

This is a neat little customizable document you can use if you are interested in creating/viewing your own intramural feeds. It's a simple way to understand and evaluate what exactly percentage wise your are administering, thus assisting in formalating a specific feed.
 

OneAcreFarm

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Obsidian":3gv33bmv said:
http://world-rabbit-science.com/

(Click on "Online-Scientific Documents" on the side bar)

This is a neat little customizable document you can use if you are interested in creating/viewing your own intramural feeds. It's a simple way to understand and evaluate what exactly percentage wise your are administering, thus assisting in formalating a specific feed.

There is a LOT of great information on that site, it is one of my faves....I actually joined the ABWRSA a while back.
 

MKirst

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WUFFFDA's ingredient composition data is really nice. All I had to do was copy & paste to my active ingredient matrix. The amounts and supply column was a bit tricky for me because I'm using Open Office so I don't have the solver that Excel has but transferring the data manually from supply and amounts isn't all that complicated. I kept getting confused though, I get like that with alot of numbers. Like a number phobia or something. :x

Really nice project there. Would be nice to see nutrient calculations and formulations for raw produce and herbs like turnips, chinese cabbage, grean beans, oregano and parsley etc. to have a total overview of rabbitry diets.

Then again I can just research that myself and include into the spread sheets I guess, although I wouldn't know a true value from just a number. You probably need some kind of knowledge about accurate percentages when researching nutrients, a creative idea anyhow. Setting the constraints in the solver dialog box for sensitivity reports would be a chore too I imagine. ;)

That's a nice project you have there and I will use and tinker with it, thanks for sharing. :D<br /><br />__________ Thu Oct 11, 2012 10:23 am __________<br /><br />Hey, I like the Attack Rabbit sign on your website too. :p
 

Obsidian

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MKirst-

I can't take the credit for this project-simply the discovery of it, lol! :)

I really like your idea for something that can convert and calcuate the nutritional content of various produce and herbs. I would like to work on a table that may be able to display such.

Perhaps something able to convert a rabbit's current life stage (pregnant, lactating, weaning, show, etc.)requirements into the exact nutritional needs using various sources. There could also be list giving way to acceptable substitutes as well for certain ingredients-and in order of most beneficial. A way of allotting room for variables would be nice as well (environmental temperature, age, BMI, etc) as these can also greatly factor in the seperate needs of each rabbit. However, as you had stated, this could present a challenge-more of technical one than a mathematical one-at least in my eyes! lol

This is something I would be very eager to work on, and I'm attempting to envision it in my mind, so bear with me in the current ruff draft of chaos! lol

I have the basic requirements here (for a healthy non breeding adult):

Protein:
12%-16% (120-160 g/kg)

Fiber:
20%-25% (200-250 g/kg)

Fat:
2.5%-4% (25-40 g/kg)

Vitamin A:
10,000 IU/kg

Vitamin B:
Must be supplemented with thiamine, pyridoxine, riboflavin, and niacin

Vitamin D:
1000 IU/kg

Vitamin E:
0.05% (50mg/kg)

Calcium:
0.5%-1.0% (5-10g/kg)

Phosphorus:
0.4%-0.8% (4-8g/kg)

Magnesium:
0.3% (3g/kg)

Zinc:
0.05% (50mg/kg)

Potassium:
0.6% (6g/kg)

Sodium:
0.2%-0.25% (2-2.5g/kg)

Chloride:
0.17%-0.32% (1.7-3.2g/kg)

Iron:
30-100 ppm

Copper:
5.20ppm

Manganese:
8-15ppm

Seledium"
0.05ppm

Iodine:
0.4-2ppm

Cobalt:
1.0ppm




Nutritional Content of Various Hay Types:

(Measured in order of percent of dry matter, digestable energy kcal/kg, percent of crude protein, percent of crude fiber, and percent of clacium)

Alfalfa Hay: 90 1800 15.3 27.0 1.4
Barley Hay: 87 1790 7.6 24.0 .2
Barley Straw Hay: 91 1580 4.0 38.0 .3
Bermuda Grass Hay: 92 1656 11 27.6 .4
Red Clover Hay: 88 1760 17.3 21.8 1.3
White Clover Hay: 92 2924 21.4 20.9 1.8
Lespedeza Hay: 92 1290 12.7 28.1 .9
Oat Hay: 88 2000 7.3 29.5 .3
Oat Straw Ha:y 92 1640 4.1 37.0 .3
Orchard Grass Hay: 89 1829 9.8 30.0 .3
Prairie Hay: 92 1670 5.3 31.0 0
Ryegrass Hay: 86 2070 7.4 26.0 .5
Sudan Grass Hay: 91 1860 7.3 33.0 .5
Timonthy Hay: 89 2010 6.3 30.2 0
Wheat Hay: 88 1870 7.4 25.0 .2
Wheat Straw Hay: 89 1340 3.2 37.0 .2


So if a chart could be made displaying the above content, including that of general forage/produce/herbs given and allowance of room for calculating the needs of each rabbit - Do we think that would be something rabbitry owners would want to use? What other factors would people like to see in such a chart?

(edit: Apologies for the jumble of numbers for the various hay types-I couldn't get my chart image to load! :p)
 

MaggieJ

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Red clover has a tendency to develop mould, especially on the lower stem and leaves. It is an excellent food for rabbits if it is in good condition. The trouble with it, when it is in hay, is that it is difficult to tell if it is okay or not.
 

MKirst

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I added the hay values you provided to my chart, I see they will become handy once I really sit down and manage the value of my rabbits diet. Nice to know project to keep in my record folder, anyhow.

I do have a question, in addition to the info you provided for the hay values - I did some searching to find the individual fiber values as well IE: acid detergent, neutral detergent, digestible feed value and relative feed value .. so I can fill them in as well. Which brought me to my question of - wouldn't those values depend on the growth stages of say alfalfa or timothy like mid bloom, full bloom, budding etc ? also how it was raked and or baled ? The reason I ask this is because I know if raked and left in the sun to dry to long the alfalfa and or timothy looses "quality" and nutrients by the hour. There's a certain time frame of cutting and drying to get the most quality and nutrients before bale.

How do you figure the true value for say total digestible nutrients and relative feed values of each product in question ? Just assume each bale was raked and dried perfectly ?

Or for example relative feed values - just do an estimate of say the potential value of intake and digestibility based on estimates of both intake and digestibility ? And do the same for crude protein values ?

This is a pretty cool program, I like it. Do you happen to have resource links ? lol ;)

I think another addition to what is already provided on those spreadsheets would be the quality of rabbit waste from your rabbitry. Like if someone wanted to bag up and sell rabbit berries to have the nutrient value handy for different growths/species of plant, veggie or flower production for gardeners.

LOL sounds kinda stupid I know, but sounds interesting to say the least. My neighbor comes over and wants rabbit waste for her house plants .. she says her wondering jews and philo's bush out more and laves don't turn yellow.

Thoughts ? :p

WUFFF.JPG


The image above doesn't show all the values filled in but I added what you provided. I'll work on the others when I figure out how exactly. :shock:
 

Obsidian

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I really like what you've been able to add to the chart! Plus it's so much more organized! :bounce:

You’re certainly right-the nutrient density in hay is measured by respiration for plant tissue, leaf shattering, exposure to moisture/rain, and storage of hay/size of bales, etc. Every single one of these factors can play a huge role in altering amounts. Even if we are working with a single species of hay for example, yours could have entirely different ingredient content than mine, simply by how we produced and treated it.

Some examples of slight variation:

-A round bale stored outside for 1 year can lose up to 22% of its dry matter, however in two years it can lose only 25% dry matter.

-Hay exposed on the outside and bottom of a bale will lose protein almost 7 times faster than hay on the inside of a bale.

-As well, hay exposed to high amounts of humidity will use 10%-15% of the readily digestible carbohydrates. Hay that has contacted with rain will be higher in acid detergent fiber and neutral detergent fibers.

- At the same time, crude protein can drop from 11.1% at the first cutting to 8.9% after just two days of drying.


Unfortunately, without both field and laboratory analysis, there is no definite way to examine the exact contents of a specific cut of hay. So we are therefore left with an average idea.

So perhaps we should list two columns next to each value, indicating the minimum and maximum amount?

Even if we did that, it may still be rather vague; however it will give a general idea of what one is working with and what to expect. I’m still conducting further research on various hay species, but the difference in timing and percentage of nutrient loss in each one is greatly diverse and apparent.

For example with alfalfa:

-On average, alfalfa will lose its digestibility 0.5% per day after flowering. Bermuda grass drops about 0.2% per day between 4-8 weeks of age.

-With alfalfa, we lose roughly around 12% moisture and 4%-7% dry matter with each cut (depending on storage).

So in order to obtain relative feed value-

We need to calculate the amount of digestible dry matter and dry matter intake of each species of hay.

DDM = Digestible Dry Matter = 88.9 - (0.779 x % ADF)
DMI = Dry Matter Intake = 120 / ( % NDF )
RFV = (DDM x DMI) / 1.29



I do like the concept of requiring detailed nutrient content of manure, especially for gardening. :)

In general:

The nitrogen content found in rabbit manure is 2.4%, the phosphorus content is 1.4%, and the potassium content is 0.6%. There are also trace elements of calcium, magnesium, boron, zinc, manganese, sulfur, copper, and cobolt in it. (I can’t find the exact numbers of these just yet! :p)
 

Miss M

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I'm glad I revisited this thread. Y'all have some fascinating information, and it really highlights what an inexact science feeding animals is. Thankfully, they seem resilient enough to handle it! :lol:

I actually bought a forage mix to plant as a lawn, when I'm finally able to do so! :lol:
 

Ablebreeze

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It's been a while since this thread was active. How did the project go or did it fizzle?

Sounds like maybe there was a little over-thinking going on, but the idea sounds great.

There's a reason why feed bags have min and max values on them. 😉
 

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