Register

FODDER: A beginning. It's comin' along. Final shots.

Provide a well rounded diet without commercial feed, including discussions of the methods and merits of growing fodder.
5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 1983
Joined: January 25, 2012
Location: plattsburg, missouri
Thanks: 55
Thanked: 607 in 379 posts
BunnyBucks: 10,850.00

FODDER: A beginning. It's comin' along. Final shots.

Post Number:#1  Unread postby grumpy » Thu May 15, 2014 11:15 pm


Got a long ways to go. I'm tired of being at the mercy of the feed
conglomerates. This is the first step to either: independence or wasted effort.
Time will tell.

The basic frame. If successful, another identical one will be built.
Image

With luck, this unit will produce 20-25 pounds per day.
Image

I'll post updated pictures as the project progresses. My goal is 50+ pounds
of barley fodder per day. About $350.00 to $400.00 per month in savings
on feed expenses.
Image

The project has two steps. The racks producing the feed, and the tight-room
that will be environmentally controlled. I'll have pics of both steps as they progress.

grumpy
Last edited by Miss M on Fri Jun 20, 2014 11:46 am, edited 4 times in total.
Reason: Added to title
Author of Historical Romance Novels: The Trilogy of: Box of Dreams, Scarlet Dreams, and Shattered Dreams.
My newest work: Now in publication. Redemption Road.
Visit my website for more information. http://www.ekfelts.com

The following user would like to thank grumpy for this post
coyotejoe, Gearmpr, Honey

4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership
Posts: 3242
Joined: June 3, 2012
Location: Alberta, Canada
Canada
Thanks: 182
Thanked: 254 in 226 posts
BunnyBucks: 16,745.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#2  Unread postby 3mina » Thu May 15, 2014 11:44 pm


I'll be following this thread closely. I want to do the same thing once I have everything all in one spot
Rex and American Sables

4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 913
Joined: December 18, 2012
Location: Gloucester, Virginia
United States of America Male
Thanks: 9
Thanked: 81 in 71 posts
BunnyBucks: 5,215.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#3  Unread postby ckcs » Thu May 15, 2014 11:45 pm


Looks great already

Moderator
7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 14491
Joined: January 20, 2010
United States of America Female
Thanks: 963
Thanked: 1496 in 1224 posts
BunnyBucks: 56,195.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#4  Unread postby Miss M » Fri May 16, 2014 12:05 am


I shall be watching this space. :popcorn:
Sithrah Farm - http://sithrahfarm.com/

We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
- James Madison

3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 645
Joined: February 9, 2014
Location: Western Washington
United States of America Female
Thanks: 111
Thanked: 55 in 53 posts
BunnyBucks: 3,510.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#5  Unread postby Comet007 » Fri May 16, 2014 3:09 am


It looks like a great start. I like how you've tilted the shelves - are those seedling trays that you're using for the fodder? I've been reading about sprouting/fodder a little, and I'm intrigued. It seems like something the buns would enjoy a lot more than just pellets and hay. I like the idea of feeding them living food, as it's more of a nutrition powerhouse. Are you planning to feed anything beside the barley fodder?

5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 1983
Joined: January 25, 2012
Location: plattsburg, missouri
Thanks: 55
Thanked: 607 in 379 posts
BunnyBucks: 10,850.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#6  Unread postby grumpy » Fri May 16, 2014 6:08 am


Comet007 wrote:It looks like a great start. I like how you've tilted the shelves - are those seedling trays that you're using for the fodder? I've been reading about sprouting/fodder a little, and I'm intrigued. It seems like something the buns would enjoy a lot more than just pellets and hay. I like the idea of feeding them living food, as it's more of a nutrition powerhouse. Are you planning to feed anything beside the barley fodder?


Comet: Yes, those are #1020 solid bottomed nursery trays. I have to put
the holes in the bottoms on the down-slope side.

I doubt I'll ever go completely to a fodder based diet. At least not any time soon.
Until I get my "fodder-legs" well underneath me, I'd worry about a failure
with one day's production. That would leave the stock with the only option
of pellets and hay. I'd still have to have them "pellet-ready" in case this occurs.

I'll be looking for a good source of timothy hay during this change-over.
Right now, I'm feeding an alfalfa-grass hay mixture.

After the situation in late March and early April, I swore I'd be making a change.
I'd been researching this feed-concept for a good while before I had the trouble.
Since then, I've read nearly everything I can get my hands on, and even
visited two farmstead's that use fodder as their only feed source. They were
kind enough to show me their operations and explain their methods. One was
producing well over 2000 pounds per week for their small group of dairy cattle.

They swore by the fodder system and also have a good source of organic
barley seed that I'll be able to purchase by the bushel. $16.00/bushel.
They also offer 2000 pound bags of barley seed with a 20% price-break
and can deliver for a small fee. They're not that far from me and this is
probably the way I'll end up buying my grain.

With the size of my operation, the feed requirements vary on a day-to-day basis.
Right now, I've got well over 200 head of youngsters that are on the verge
of being moved into the grow-out pens. Naturally, the food requirements
will increase dramatically over a week's time. It's going to take some fancy
calculating to be able to produce what will hopefully be 85% of their daily
food with barley fodder.

Right now, this is just the first step to what will hopefully be a major change
in my rabbitry. If all goes well, I will need more room for increased production.
If this is the case, the "tight-room" I'm building will have to be expanded to
double capacity. I'll convert my attached greenhouse into a better suited space
for strictly this purpose. If all goes according to plan, it will be 45-60 days
before everything is in place and running at full capacity.

Like I said at the beginning of this post, this will either be a huge success or
a monumental waste of time and effort. We shall see.

Grumpy.
Author of Historical Romance Novels: The Trilogy of: Box of Dreams, Scarlet Dreams, and Shattered Dreams.
My newest work: Now in publication. Redemption Road.
Visit my website for more information. http://www.ekfelts.com

Site Supporter
5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 2977
Joined: January 1, 2012
Location: Near ottawa ontario
Canada Female
Thanks: 645
Thanked: 190 in 187 posts
BunnyBucks: 16,633.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#7  Unread postby Mary Ann's Rabbitry » Fri May 16, 2014 8:05 am


oh, wow,, I didn't expect you going that route.. wish I could. The weather here isn't warm enough in the winter and I don't have that much space in my house to do this. ..To scare of the mold and all the rabbits are dead because of it. I will be watching this thread.. Good luck...

5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 1983
Joined: January 25, 2012
Location: plattsburg, missouri
Thanks: 55
Thanked: 607 in 379 posts
BunnyBucks: 10,850.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#8  Unread postby grumpy » Fri May 16, 2014 8:58 am


Mary Ann's Rabbitry wrote:oh, wow,, I didn't expect you going that route.. wish I could. The weather here isn't warm enough in the winter and I don't have that much space in my house to do this. ..To scare of the mold and all the rabbits are dead because of it. I will be watching this thread.. Good luck...


Me too........!!

However, down at the barn, I've got plenty of room and with my skills in
carpentry and other building trades, I'm confident I can create a room that
will be easily controlled concerning heat, coolness, air exchange, and
humidity control.

One thing I have learned from viewing other successful operations is the fact
that they DO NOT recycle their water. It's used only one time to water the
seed mats then it's disposed of. The use of clear, clean water each time it's
needed should eliminate the mold issue. (At least, this is my "hope".) I will
be soaking seed with a bleach additive to ward off mold spores to begin
with. The water consumption should be under 15 gallons per day on the
initial set-up. I'm allowing a one-gallon flush per row, twice a day.

Like I said: This will either "work" or be a monumental "FLOP". Either way,
I feel it should be shared with everyone. In doing so, someone might see
something that I haven't and offer a positive suggestion.

I've got three water pumps on hand to incorporate into the flushing, disposal,
and re-filling of water reservoirs in the tight-room. "In my mind"...I can
visualize what I'm wanting to do and wanting to create. Now, comes the
"fun-stuff" of bringing it to a reality.

Something to keep in mind is the fact that for 10 or 15 years, I raised
literally thousands of vegetable plants from seeds in the greenhouse.
So, I've got a good basic knowledge of the different problems associated
with growing stuff. I encountered quite a few normal difficulties when I
did this.

Keeping my fingers crossed. :x

Grumpy.
Author of Historical Romance Novels: The Trilogy of: Box of Dreams, Scarlet Dreams, and Shattered Dreams.
My newest work: Now in publication. Redemption Road.
Visit my website for more information. http://www.ekfelts.com

Site Supporter
4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 1812
Joined: February 18, 2013
Location: Big Island of Hawaii
United States of America Female
Thanks: 48
Thanked: 153 in 130 posts
BunnyBucks: 10,358.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#9  Unread postby dayna » Fri May 16, 2014 5:48 pm


I've played around with fodder for the buns and goats and due to my climate fully grown fodder is just not an option. Too much mold, however I'm looking at 2-3 day old sprouts instead and supplementing their diets with that. Probably the barley route as it's the easiest grain other than corn for me to get.

Moderator
7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 14491
Joined: January 20, 2010
United States of America Female
Thanks: 963
Thanked: 1496 in 1224 posts
BunnyBucks: 56,195.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#10  Unread postby Miss M » Fri May 16, 2014 10:15 pm


I haven't seen barley or wheat around here outside of a Whole Foods store. I'm going to have to try mine with oats, which I hear are more difficult. :(
Sithrah Farm - http://sithrahfarm.com/

We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
- James Madison

Site Supporter
3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
Posts: 601
Joined: December 30, 2013
Location: Georgia
United States of America Female
Thanks: 233
Thanked: 228 in 150 posts
BunnyBucks: 2,978.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#11  Unread postby the reluctant farmer » Fri May 16, 2014 11:11 pm


Looking forward to seeing this all together, Grumpy. I played around with small amounts of barley fodder this winter and was liking what I saw. A lot less grain waste (natural feed) and good for he buns. As it got warmer here I had problems because the area I was sprouting in was too warm. Keeping my fingers crossed and hoping this is successful. Your racks look great, by the way. How tall are they?

3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
Posts: 26
Joined: April 17, 2014
Thanks: 35
Thanked: 2 in 2 posts
BunnyBucks: 150.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#12  Unread postby Permajen » Fri May 16, 2014 11:25 pm


That's a wonderful structure, Grumpy. Will you be sprouting barley on its own, or might you do a mixture with some type of legume like peas?

By the way, I read your feeding mishap thread -- what an eye opener.

When my bucket sprouters are outgrown, I might just have to copy this... if I can figure out how to cut timber the right length just once in my life. :)

Jen

5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership5 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 1983
Joined: January 25, 2012
Location: plattsburg, missouri
Thanks: 55
Thanked: 607 in 379 posts
BunnyBucks: 10,850.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#13  Unread postby grumpy » Sat May 17, 2014 6:52 am


the reluctant farmer wrote: Your racks look great, by the way. How tall are they?


Right at 5' tall. 36 1/2" wide and 24" front to back. It was "fun"
getting all of the pieces cut to the exact dimensions. The entire unit was
made out of that big pile of dunnage lumber that was given to me. Every
piece was very rough and had to be re-sawn to clean it up and "re-size" it
properly. Thank Heaven I'd just bought a new carbide-tip blade for my saw.

Permajen wrote:That's a wonderful structure, Grumpy. Will you be sprouting barley on its own, or might you do a mixture with some type of legume like peas?
By the way, I read your feeding mishap thread -- what an eye opener.
Jen


I've got a source for organic field peas. I hadn't thought much past being
proficient at sprouting the barley seed to begin with. I may pick up a sack
of the peas and incorporate small amounts into the process. I know peas
have a higher protein percentage straight out of the bag when compared
to barley.

I'm still having issues with that bad feed. Not on the large scale like when it
occurred, but with individual breeders and some of the youngsters that
were subjected to the feed problems. Slow growth on the youngsters that
survived seems to be my biggest concern, and I've lost a doe or two since
then. It was a nightmare and one that made what I'm attempting now,
a reality.

I don't take that kind of nonsense lying down and it's hard to absorb that
large of a "HIT" on my pocket book. I've not put pencil to paper to figure
the entire loss. I'd probably be sick to my stomach if I did.

I spent the bigger part of yesterday morning getting a trailer-load of
high-density, exterior-grade, rigid-insulation a friend of mine gave me.
It's mostly in smaller pieces but something that I can easily "make-work".
Once I realized how much was in the stack, I began making mental changes
on the overall size of the "tight-room" I'll be working on.

:P It started getting bigger. LOL. :P

Haven't got a pic of the load yet, but I will sometime today.

BTW: I found a more economical source for my barley
@ $12.50 per 50# bag.
I have to buy a one-month's supply at a time.

grumpy.
Last edited by grumpy on Tue Jun 10, 2014 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Author of Historical Romance Novels: The Trilogy of: Box of Dreams, Scarlet Dreams, and Shattered Dreams.
My newest work: Now in publication. Redemption Road.
Visit my website for more information. http://www.ekfelts.com

Site Supporter
3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 1632
Joined: December 6, 2013
Location: Southern Utah, 5800' elevation, zone 5
United States of America Male
Thanks: 524
Thanked: 379 in 299 posts
BunnyBucks: 7,950.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#14  Unread postby michaels4gardens » Sat May 17, 2014 7:56 am


sounds wonderful, I tried a sprouted grain, growing system a lot of years ago, it worked well, I used fresh water also with a mister system on some of it, and drip system on some of it, I solved some of the slow growth problem by growing kale in my greenhouse for year-round feeding, to add to the sprouted grain mixes, --[and eventually adding some feed concentrate pellets again, to boost the rate of gain to please my boss ]- but there was no problem with the system if you did not mind a little slower growth, [the feed company I was working for at the time wanted faster growth, so the system and project. was eventually defunded] - I did have to make more growout pens to accommodate the slower growth, but-- as far as I was concerned the rabbits were healthy, and I had very few problems. There was less fat on the rabbit raised that way, [and I like the fat- but for some, less fat is a good selling point].
Seed Garlic, http://www.Mountainvalleygarlic.com , https://www.facebook.com/Mountain-Valle ... 254347988/,
hard neck garlic varieties for fall planting.
meat-mutt rabbits, a few laying hens, and too many ducks..
https://vimeo.com/176370337?ref

Site Supporter
4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership4 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 1812
Joined: February 18, 2013
Location: Big Island of Hawaii
United States of America Female
Thanks: 48
Thanked: 153 in 130 posts
BunnyBucks: 10,358.00

Re: A begining.

Post Number:#15  Unread postby dayna » Sat May 17, 2014 12:39 pm


That's not a bad price, I pay $18 for a 50# bag here at the livestock feed store. I had the option of normal or malted. I tried the malted and it rotted worse than the normal. Though it did sprout.

Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests