What color is this kit?

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This kit looks fawn or orange but with blue underneath? see its littermate which isnclearly orange or red with white belly and ears.

Doe was fawn/orange, buck was orange/red. Not sure what.idore than 3 generations back.
 

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These are meat mutts. Their lineage includes a Flemish Giant apparently non-extension chestnut, a very lightly California marked doe, a red New Zealand/Flemish Giant cross and some REW TAMUK. I have never had a tort and am not sure.where.that could have come from. Could TORT happen with crossing red/fawn with the Californian points? or is there some shaded rabbit in the lineage popping up?
 
I agree, the ones with blue are tortoiseshell, 'tort' for short. Non-extension is the double recessive gene that prints the orange/fawn tones on the main body hair instead of the usual dark colors. When paired with the agouti gene it produces red/orange/fawn with light bellies and light inside the ears, on the belly, around the eyes, and under the nose. However, when paired with non-agouti (self) color, you get tortoiseshell. where the main body color is still orange, but the points (ears, nose, feet, tail) are dark. The color of the points depends on two other genes, the black/brown and dense color/dilute color genes. Black + dense color = black tort, often just called 'tort'. Black + dilute = blue tort, chocolate + dense = chocolate tort, chocolate + dilute = lilac tort.

Californians are black, dense, non-agouti, full-extension and Himalayan pattern. Reds can be black or chocolate based, dense, agouti, non-extension, full color. Black is dominant, dense is dominant, agouti is dominant, full extension is dominant, full color is dominant. So yes, if the Cal carried a recessive non-extension to match the red's only non-extension, and the red carried a recessive non-agouti to match the Cal's only non-agouti, you'd have--black, dense, non-agouti, non-extension, full color--in other words, a tort.
 
I agree, the ones with blue are tortoiseshell, 'tort' for short. Non-extension is the double recessive gene that prints the orange/fawn tones on the main body hair instead of the usual dark colors. When paired with the agouti gene it produces red/orange/fawn with light bellies and light inside the ears, on the belly, around the eyes, and under the nose. However, when paired with non-agouti (self) color, you get tortoiseshell. where the main body color is still orange, but the points (ears, nose, feet, tail) are dark. The color of the points depends on two other genes, the black/brown and dense color/dilute color genes. Black + dense color = black tort, often just called 'tort'. Black + dilute = blue tort, chocolate + dense = chocolate tort, chocolate + dilute = lilac tort.

Californians are black, dense, non-agouti, full-extension and Himalayan pattern. Reds can be black or chocolate based, dense, agouti, non-extension, full color. Black is dominant, dense is dominant, agouti is dominant, full extension is dominant, full color is dominant. So yes, if the Cal carried a recessive non-extension to match the red's only non-extension, and the red carried a recessive non-agouti to match the Cal's only non-agouti, you'd have--black, dense, non-agouti, non-extension, full color--in other words, a tort.
The Californian in my line carried a dilute gene and was very light. I think she may even have been a lilac or blue Californian. She has been dead since September, though, so I cannot refer back to her. She was pictured here in another thread Inwill try to include.
 

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