Taking doe to a different rabbitry for breeding

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KelleyBee

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Has anyone ever taken a doe to a buck living in a different rabbitry for breeding? I know there are health concerns such as viruses, but other than that, are there other considerations? I’m not as concerned about virus issues because all of the rabbits at the rabbitry I am considering originally came from my rabbitry and it was just a few months ago. I'm just curious as to how receptive a doe would be after a car ride and in a strange rabbitry.
 
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jaxmarblebuns

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I’ve only herd one story from my mom about it back in the 80s. Her dad bred, showed and ate rabbits and had anywhere from 100-250 at a time. He specialized in rex and the tri color variety, which was not popular back then (he’s one of the reasons the variety is still around where I am.) So, when he herd that another breeder had a tri buck he though it would be perfect for his tri do. He dropped off his doe and was going to come back the next morning to pick her up. What they failed to communicate was that they stud owners did overnight breeding, when they came back the does ears where completely gone. Tat was enough of a horror story for me to be too cautious to ever want to do it. Plus, as long as your lines are strong there not too much of a reason to do it imo
 

KelleyBee

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I’ve only herd one story from my mom about it back in the 80s. Her dad bred, showed and ate rabbits and had anywhere from 100-250 at a time. He specialized in rex and the tri color variety, which was not popular back then (he’s one of the reasons the variety is still around where I am.) So, when he herd that another breeder had a tri buck he though it would be perfect for his tri do. He dropped off his doe and was going to come back the next morning to pick her up. What they failed to communicate was that they stud owners did overnight breeding, when they came back the does ears where completely gone. Tat was enough of a horror story for me to be too cautious to ever want to do it. Plus, as long as your lines are strong there not too much of a reason to do it imo
Thank you for your insightful story. I would definitely never leave a doe in with a strange buck without myself staying, witnessing and then taking her out when the deed was done. I'm just curious as to how receptive a doe would be after a car ride and in a strange rabbitry. I think I'll add that to my question for context.
 

jaxmarblebuns

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Thank you for your insightful story. I would definitely never leave a doe in with a strange buck without myself staying, witnessing and then taking her out when the deed was done. I'm just curious as to how receptive a doe would be after a car ride and in a strange rabbitry. I think I'll add that to my question for context.
Well! after my GP’s doe had the car ride, strangers house, and stress of ears being eaten she did get pregnant and had a healthy litter. I feel receptiveness in times of stress really just depends on the tameness of the doe, receptiveness in general really.
 

HTAcres

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I have seen people suggest taking does on car rides to get them receptive - more than once. I would definitely try it in the situation you are describing if I had a good reason. My experience with having does bred and then moved - whether from my place or to my place is about 50% success rate. I suspect the stress of a new place which would be less of a factor in this scenario.
 

BuffBrahmaBantam

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I don’t have personal experience but from what we have heard, yes, it works with no major issues regarding doe receptiveness. I would be interested to hear about your experience if you decide to do it. It is called stud service - like breeding horses. I don’t think it is all that uncommon because we’ve asked 2 rabbit breeders near us and both said yes, they’ve done it before and would be happy to offer stud service. We asked because I am thinking of getting rid of our buck and keeping two does. We don’t need much meat so breeding two does once or twice a year using stud service at some one else’s rabbitry would save us money on not needing to feed a buck. Problem is I’m getting pretty attached to our buck, LOL, so it might be more challenging to implement than I originally thought. He is a real character.
 

HTAcres

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I don’t have personal experience but from what we have heard, yes, it works with no major issues regarding doe receptiveness. I would be interested to hear about your experience if you decide to do it. It is called stud service - like breeding horses. I don’t think it is all that uncommon because we’ve asked 2 rabbit breeders near us and both said yes, they’ve done it before and would be happy to offer stud service. We asked because I am thinking of getting rid of our buck and keeping two does. We don’t need much meat so breeding two does once or twice a year using stud service at some one else’s rabbitry would save us money on not needing to feed a buck. Problem is I’m getting pretty attached to our buck, LOL, so it might be more challenging to implement than I originally thought. He is a real character.
I feel ya!!!!
 

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