Super mix- added supplements?

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Estrella

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So I was watching a vlog the other day and a women mentioned all the benefits of adding 1/2 table spoon of what she calls her “Super mix”. It had Barely, flaxseed, rolled oats, raw unsalted pumpkin seeds and black oil sunflower seeds all mixed together. After trying to gather all this stuff I realized I came home with flaxseed meal instead of it being in a seed version. I’d like to make a solid kinda small “treat” with these instead of a regular basis kinda mix so with that being said- what base would I use to hold it all together? Or have you made a similar bar/ treat of some sorts that you can suggest looking at? 5D5CA115-83B9-42D7-93C2-99D4BDDDEF44.jpeg
 

MnCanary

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These sort of extras make YOU feel better, but I haven't found any science that proves they make a better rabbit. There are a lot of breeders that say they help, but there are many breeders that raise their rabbits on only pellets. I'd be curious to know if a rabbit judge could tell the difference.
 

MuddyFarms

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So I was watching a vlog the other day and a women mentioned all the benefits of adding 1/2 table spoon of what she calls her “Super mix”. It had Barely, flaxseed, rolled oats, raw unsalted pumpkin seeds and black oil sunflower seeds all mixed together. After trying to gather all this stuff I realized I came home with flaxseed meal instead of it being in a seed version. I’d like to make a solid kinda small “treat” with these instead of a regular basis kinda mix so with that being said- what base would I use to hold it all together? Or have you made a similar bar/ treat of some sorts that you can suggest looking at? View attachment 30944


I sometimes make a little treat mix by using ingredients like you have there and adding a SMALL amount of diluted molasses. (I know @MaggieJ has done this for her rabbits as well.) That helps it stick together more, but I would be cautious about using enough to make it stick into a bar. Something like this is usually considered a 'sweet feed' for other animals. The sugars in molasses need to be used in moderation, or it can upset their GI tract. To make the diluted molasses, take a little molasses and mix a bit of water into it to thin it and make it easier to evenly mix into the grains. After mixing it in, I leave the grain in an open container (stirring occasionally) so it can dry out before storing.

Things I have added to my mixtures depending on availability and whether I use it as a breeding supplement or treat:

Tiny amount kelp powder
Camelina seeds
Cracked wheat

Sometimes when feeding the pumpkin seeds I have had nursing or pregnant does end up with soft stool from them. Seems to mess with their digestion when they are sensitive during those times. Just something to keep in mind when feeding them.
 

MuddyFarms

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These sort of extras make YOU feel better, but I haven't found any science that proves they make a better rabbit. There are a lot of breeders that say they help, but there are many breeders that raise their rabbits on only pellets. I'd be curious to know if a rabbit judge could tell the difference.

I don't know if/when a judge would be able to tell. I mean, they only see/touch a particular animal so many times and in conjunction with lots of other rabbits as well. A breeder that spends lots of time working with and developing their herd should know their rabbits pretty well. I lean toward this sort of supplementation as being dependent on your particular feed. I know feed companies spend varying amounts of time and money formulating and testing their feeds, but each feed is different and has its own shortcomings. Each line and each rabbit in a herd has specific needs. I recall being told by a breeder that you 'breed to your feed'. As a breeder, a person selects kits to be saved as breeding stock in their herd based on certain traits they wish to preserve. When breeding for meat, the size at 8-12 weeks, rate of gain, etc. are important. Whichever kits grow the best on the feed(s) they get are likely to be kept. As this goes on, you are breeding rabbits to perform well on your feed (and in your climate, housing, etc.). When someone acquires one of your rabbits for breeding, they start the process over unless they keep using the same feed. I'm sure the amount this affects things varies, since there are so many pelleted feed options.

I personally used BOSS and oats with my working does (and their kits) when feeding Purina Professional or Purina Complete, as the amount of fat in those pellets produced unsatisfactory results. It does take a careful hand when doing this sort of supplementation, because you need to watch body condition (and how full the kits are) to know the amount to use.

Just some of my thoughts about supplementing feeds.
 

MaggieJ

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As @MuddyFarms mentioned, I have made a similar supplement for my rabbits. Sorry, I do not remember exactly what ingredients I used as I have not had rabbits for quite a few years due to mobility issues.

After combining the dry ingredients, I added a dilute solution of blackstrap molasses and mixed it in thoroughly. Using hot water makes the molasses dissolve more easily. Blackstrap molasses is made from the third processing of sugar cane or beets. It contains most of the nutrients of the sugar cane and much less of the sweetness.


I don't know if the mixture would hold together enough to make bars or not. You wouldn't want to feed too much molasses. I just fed it as is -- mainly during the coldest part of the winter as a little boost. Since I was feeding a pelletless diet and that was also the time of year when fresh greens are scantiest, I felt it was a useful supplement.
 

Rabun Farms

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Not try to sound ugly but I raise Boers Goat and Holland Lops. If you have a complete feed you don't have to give supplements, they will have everything they need.
 

MaggieJ

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Not try to sound ugly but I raise Boers Goat and Holland Lops. If you have a complete feed you don't have to give supplements, they will have everything they need.
Not everyone wants to feed a pellet diet. I fed my rabbits a natural diet (alfalfa/grass hay, lots of fresh or dried forage, small amounts of grain, and a trace mineral salt block. My cost per pound dropped from $1.50 to 0.75 and the flavour of the meat was much fresher and sweeter.

Not everyone has the time, energy, and acreage to do this but it is certainly a viable alternative to a "complete" feed.
 

ThunderHill

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I’d like to make a solid kinda small “treat” with these instead of a regular basis kinda mix so with that being said- what base would I use to hold it all together? Or have you made a similar bar/ treat of some sorts that you can suggest looking at?
Hi! I'm not sure if it's helpful, but I once tried a recipe for a cereal bar for human babies that was mostly oats, but it had unsweetened applesauce and Chia seeds as the binder. When the chia was moistened by the applesauce and baked, they got all tacky-sticky and held it all together really well. I just thought of that when I read your question. Maybe something you can experiment with?
 

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