parasite control protocols

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michaels4gardens

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I think.. in view of the many questions that have been asked of late, I should start a thread on parasites in general, and not just add some info to the bottom of existing threads,
below I have copy and pasted from a recent thread.

Re: Evil Pinworms strike....again

Post Number:#6 Postby michaels4gardens » Fri Dec 25, 2015 8:42 am


In Nature I have noticed that wild rabbits eat plants that are natural wormers, like mowing off my onions, garlic, or chives, cleaning up some of the peach leaves in the fall, as well as eating sage brush. I suspect some of the other plants wild animals eat also expel worms.
As mentioned above, Rabbits that graze on the same areas over and over will pick up parasites in an increasing amount as time goes on.
All animals that graze [as well as ones that don't] have to be treated for worms on a regular schedule. That is just an unavoidable part of responsible animal husbandry. I feed my breed stock wormwood at least once a year, [to clean out worms ] and also feed garlic Chives just before the does due date, and again about the time the litter is coming out of the nest box. [I have a residual coccidiosis problem on this farm I now live on] -- sometime during mid winter when I do not breed, I also give each of my breeders an ivermectin shot [sub Q ].- mostly to clean up any external parasites that may exist.
I have had worming schedules for all animals I have raised, [and we humans need a worming schedule as well] Even when I raised pigs that never touched dirt, or were fed anything with dirt on it, from birth to slaughter, even though the sows were wormed prior to farrowing,-- I still had worms to contend with.
My point is-- your discovering the worms, is a motivation to have a parasite program, and as Dood mentioned above-- it could just indicate a more serious infection, -- I am confident that these parasites were there long before you noticed them.
People who raise rabbits all have parasite problems in their stock, but for the most part, they are unaware of them, so ignorance is bliss, as long as it lasts -- Parasites will be quietly robbing you in the form of feed costs, and the longevity of your breeders, as well as weakening the rabbit and it's immune system. This makes your stock more susceptible to infections of every type.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are numerous commercial wormers on the market, and a little research on your part will inform you on exactly what each one kills, and if it is safe for a particular animal- or if it should be avoided during pregnancy, etc.
there are also a great number of plants with parasite control possibilities. [some safer than others]

source
http://eap.mcgill.ca/agrobio/ab370-04e.htm

This info is not specific to rabbits,
Gape-infested pheasants have successfully been treated with pyrethrum oil, goosefoot oil and roto-resin using that method15.

BOTANICAL DEWORMERS

Several plants have anthelminthic properties, and were in fact a part of the traditional husbandry before synthetic dewormers were commonly adopted. In Québec, for instance, it was common practice to feed evergreen branches (pine, spruce or fir branches) to sheep. Although based on conventional wisdom, veterinary research zeroed in on deworming plants, also called anthelminthic plants, particularly before the Second World War in Western countries then, subsequently, mainly in Eastern countries and India. There is reliable data available on the effects of several plants or plant extracts on certain parasites, enabling us to know the limits of these substances.

Allopathy versus homeopathy

Several of the dewormer plants mentioned below may cause side effects in animals. The most powerful natural dewormers are often potential poisons. It is therefore important to follow the indicated dosages. A way to avoid side effects is to administer these plants in the form of homeopathic preparations. The advantage of homeopathic remedies is that they do not require a fasting period beforehand and laxative diet after the treatment.

Garlic

Garlic is a common plant dewormer that is easy to find. It is known to be active against, among others, Ascaris, Enterobius and, of particular interest for ruminants, against lungworm in general1. It must be used, however, as prevention (prophylaxis) rather than as treatment or with other products. In fact, garlic does not prevent the production of eggs but prevents the eggs of certain parasites from developing into larvae5. In the ninth century, in Persia, Avicenne recommended the use of garlic as an additive rather than as a dewormer alone. Garlic is incorporated into certain commercial homeopathic or allopathic dewormers, but always with other plant-derived substances. The numerous therapeutic properties of garlic come mainly from its high sulphur content.

Garlic can be administered in several ways:
•Fresh: Fresh minced garlic proved to be clearly more efficient than garlic extracts for controlling internal parasites in carp30. Using fresh garlic is ideal although not necessarily the most practical on a day-to-day basis. The leaves and bulbs may also be used. If the animals do not want to eat the leaves whole, they may be cut into small pieces, mixed with molasses and bran, and shaped into small balls. The bulbs may be grated and mashed with molasses or honey and flour. Garlic may also be planted directly in the pastures in such way that the animals have access to it as needed.
•Powder: The most practical way to administer garlic is undoubtedly to add powdered garlic to animal feed. Powdered garlic can be bought at a reasonable cost in bulk from major food manufacturers (e.g. McCormick, Quest International, Griffith Laboratories, etc.).
•Pills: This is a method that is useful only for very small herds. Two or three pills of four grains is the required daily dosage for one sheep.
•Juice: British herbalist Grieve16 suggested using garlic juice or garlic milk as a dewormer. Garlic milk is made by boiling bulbs mashed in milk. Some researchers recommend, however, not boiling garlic as this reduces its effectiveness against parasite eggs and larvae.
•Mother tincture: Garlic mother tincture is given in dosages of 20 drops/day/10 kg of live weight.

In the case of dairy animals, it is preferable to feed them garlic during or immediately after milking so that the milk does not pick up the taste.

Wormwood

Wormwood, as its name suggests, is an excellent dewormer. Many wormwood species have deworming properties.


- Common mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) is effective against Protostrongylus, Dictyocaulus and Bunostomum. Sheep, goats and fowl readily consume it10.

- Common wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) must be used with caution as it may be dangerous if used regularly or excessively. The dried and crushed flowers may be used or steeped in cold water. De Baïracli-Levy9 suggests the following recipe for dewormer balls: four teaspoons of cayenne pepper powder, two teaspoons of powdered common wormwood mixed with honey and flour.

[ I just give a tbl spoon of cut and sifted [not powder] to each rabbit in winter when I am not breeding]

- Eurasian wormwood (Artemisia cina) is a desert plant that is used to make santonin and the homeopathic remedy Cina, which are used as dewormers. Santonin is extracted from the dried buds of the plant. The buds are then treated with liquid lime and dried again. Santonin acts against most parasites except Echinococcus. It must be used with caution, however, because even in small doses it causes side effects, particularly eye problems. Homeopathic Cina may be acquired as mother tincture, administered in 2 to 3 drops/10 kg, morning and evening for 3 weeks, or in granules in different dilutions. Consult a homeopathic veterinarian for more information.


- The dried, powdered shoots of Artemisia herba-alba wormwood (a species common to North Africa) administered in dosages of 10 to 30 g per goat proved highly effective against Haemonchus contortus17.

- Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) also has deworming properties. Several wormwood species grow wild in North America. It might be a good idea to let these plants grow along pastures where the animals can eat them as needed.

Wild ginger

Wild ginger or snakeroot (Asarum canadense) grows in wooded areas. This plant is very similar to European wild ginger which was used as an anthelminthic purge for cattle and horses. The dosage per animal is 20 to 30 g of the aerial parts of snakeroot mixed with wet bran. Wild ginger also has antibacterial properties. If planning to use this plant, remember that wild ginger, as well as wild garlic, require several years to reproduce.

Goosefoot

Chenopodium ambrosioides or goosefoot is a widely used dewormer plant. In Brazil, the plant is fed directly to pigs to deworm them. The powdered seeds serve as a dewormer and insecticide. The Japanese make a dewormer tea with the leaves. Oil from the goosefoot, although highly efficient, is extremely toxic. Human consumption has often led to strong side effects (nausea, headaches) and even death in some cases. It is better to use less hazardous substances than goosefoot oil.

Conifers

Conifers, like garlic, are undoubtedly more indicated in prophylactic form, that is, in small quantities in daily food, rather than as a curative treatment. In Russia, Ascaris infestations in pigs were reduced by giving them 1 to 2 kg of pine needles each day for 2 to 4 weeks39 and mixtures of conifer needle powder and sulphur or vitamins were also used successfully against internal parasites.

In practical terms, it is easier to use pitch, also called turpentine, extracted from pine and various other conifers. Turpentine spirits are a byproduct of turpentine distillation. Cabaret6 prescribes 50 to 100 ml of spirits produced from turpentine distillation with a triple volume of castor oil against ruminant liver fluke and horse strongyles. A mixture of linseed oil (edible and not the variety found in hardware stores) and turpentine spirits constitutes a powerful dewormer, but which must be used with caution. If turpentine enters the respiratory system it may cause the spasmodic closure of the mouth. It is therefore preferable to use rolled oats to soak up the turpentine before feeding it to animals. For one lamb, 10 to 15 drops of turpentine spirits are mixed with an ounce of linseed oil and a pinch of ground ginger; for an adult sheep, 80 drops in two ounces of linseed oil.

Common juniper (Juniperus communis) has deworming properties, notably against liver fluke. Sheep enjoy juniper berries and deer graze on the plant. It might be interesting to allow restricted access to woodlands where the animals can find conifers to eat if they wish.

Crucifers (mustard family)

White or black mustard seeds in the amount of 2 ounces per lamb is a safe dewormer, and it is recommended allowing the herd access to mustard in the pasture or elsewhere. In India, some cattle farmers use mustard oil against parasites in the amount of 100 to 150 g per day for one week. Mustard oil is more of a laxative than a dewormer, which is nevertheless useful in eliminating some parasites.

The following crucifers are dewormers and may be added to animal feed: radishes, raw grated turnips or horseradish, nasturtium seeds.

Cucurbits

The seeds of squash, pumpkins and many other vine crops contain a deworming compound called cucurbitacin that is more or less active depending on the parasite12. The seeds may be fed directly to animals as the Canadian pioneers once did, but it is better to extract the main ingredient using water, alcohol or ether, for an effect that is similar to that of pumpkin seeds. Aqueous extracts from squash seeds (dilution 1/50) are effective against Haemonchus contortus38.

Pumpkin seed dewormer24
•- Shell and grind up the pumpkin seeds (or buy them at a grocery store).
•- Mix 500 g of the seeds with three litres of water.
•- Simmer (do not boil), while stirring, for 30 minutes.
•- Let cool 30 minutes.
•- Filter through a cloth, squeezing to remove as much juice as possible.
•- Reduce over low heat to 150-200 ml.
•- Make sure to remove oily scum.
•- Refrigerate.

Fern

The rhizomes and young shoots (fiddleheads) of the male fern (Dryopteris filix-mas) have deworming properties that have long been recognized in Europe, among others, against tapeworms (Taenia). The North American equivalent of the male fern is the evergreen shield-fern (Dryopteris marginalis). Although in the past, ether extract of the male fern was widely used against the liver fluke in the British Isles, the male fern does not give satisfactory results in the case of the Dicrocoelium fluke in sheep14, nor against Echinococcus in dogs.

The success of fern is enhanced by using fresh material and mixing it with glycerine. The male fern must be used with caution because it is toxic in high doses. In humans, for instance, it can cause headaches and nausea; the maximum dose is 7 g per adult.

Lupine

A diet made up entirely of freshly cut, lightly salted, lupine is a good dewormer that works against a large number of intestinal worms in pigs, including Trichuris (100% efficient), Strongyloides (66% efficient), Ascaris (50% efficient)7. Lupine is equally efficient against Parascaris and Strongylus in horses. It is important not to give free access to lupine, otherwise symptoms of poisoning may occur.

Nuts

Several vegetable species produce nuts that have anthelminthic properties, but unfortunately it is mostly tropical species like areca and cashew shells that are used. The fresh sap of the hazelnut (Corylus) is highly effective against Ascaris22.

Umbelliferae

Carrot seeds (Daucus carota), either wild or cultivated, are dewormers, as are teas made with the roots. A mixture of anise, cumin and juniper seeds is effective against Dictyocaulus lungworm in calves. Fennel leaves and seeds are also used as dewormers; the oil is a dewormer but very toxic too. In a central Asian area of the former USSR, it is common practice to graze sheep infected with Haemonchus in pastures where there are giant fennel (Ferula gigantea) and other Ferula species42. The worms are eliminated after two or three days and the plant is grazed for roughly 20 days. In many parts of North America, carrots and wild parsnips that grow abundantly along fields and roads could probably be used in the same way.

Pyrethrum

Pyrethrum (Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium) is commonly used as an insecticide in agriculture. It also has anthelminthic properties. As a dewormer, it is administered in powder form in animal feed. It may be safely used for warm-blooded animals, unless it is injected. In this case, it must be mixed with oil and the necessary precautions taken.

Pyrethrum is 100% effective against ascarids in chickens, in the amount of 200 mg/bird using 0.8% pyrethrum32. A complete cure was obtained against Ascaris in chickens, by giving them pyrethrum powder (concentration unknown), using 2% of the ration for 7 days44. Pyrethrum is also useful against strongyles in horses, in the amount of 3.5 mg/kg of live weight35. For more information on the veterinary uses of pyrethrum, see Urbain and Guillot41.

Although a Mediterranean plant, pyrethrum may be cultivated easily in many places. For more information on pyrethrum culture, see the Agro-Bio synthesis entitled "Home Production of Pyrethrum", available at EAP.

Tobacco

Tobacco and its derivatives (nicotine, nicotine sulphate) have been used as dewormers, particularly for fowl. With other farm animals, the mortal dose is practically the same for the worms as for the animals themselves!

Tansy

Tansy seeds (Tanacetum vulgare) are used against Nematodirus in sheep27. The oil from the flowers is also anthelminthic. An aqueous extract of tansy flowers and leaves is 100% effective in eliminating Ascaris from young horses and dogs, in the amount of 0.5ml/kg live weight in two doses administered one day apart and preceded by a one-day fast19. One kilo of leaves and flowers produces about one litre of extract. Cows and sheep consume fresh tansy easily, but goats, horses and pigs are not really fond of it.

Other plants

Blackberries, raspberries, and young ash and elder shoots are also other plant species with deworming properties that should be accessible in pastures. According to Cabaret6, beech creosote is used against lungworm in ruminants. The following plants, which grow naturally or may be cultivated in most of North America, are listed by Duke11 as having deworming properties:
•- Yarrow (Achilea millefolium), which is highly toxic to calves;
•- Sweet flag or calamus (Acorus calamus);
•- Agrimony (Agrimonia);
•- Roots or root infusions of Indian hemp (Apocynum cannabinum);
•- Calendula (Calendula officinalis);
•- Hemp (Cannabis saliva);
•- Blue cohosh (Caulopyllum thalictroides);
•- Lady slipper root extract (Cypripedium calceolus);
•- Sweet gale or bog myrtle (Myrica gale);
•- Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana);
•- Common knotgrass (Polygonum aviculare);
•- Rue (Ruta graveolens);
•- Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis);
•- Savory (Satureja montana);
•- Skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora);
•- Skunk cabbage or skunk weed (Symplocarpus foetidus);
•- Nettle (Urtica dioica) seeds and roots;
•- Valerian (Valeriana officinalis);
•- Verbena (Verbena officinalis);
•- Periwinkle (Vinca minor).
 

Zass

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:thankyou:

I've been waiting for a thread like this!!!

I can add a little of what I've seen in my own herd too. :)
Raw shelled pumpkin seeds seemed to be effective in reducing pinworms to the point of them no longer being viable in intestines of processed kits out of a doe who had previously produced kits with visible parisites.

My rabbits enjoy eating both fresh or dried Tansy and Mugwort.

Once, we had a buck get loose and decimate a very large bunch of Tansy that I had been drying near his pen. I was a bit worried, since he had consumed a large dose of a plant that I only consider to be quasi safe. Thankfully, he didn't display any obvious side effects. Tansy is said to cause uterine contractions which may lead to abortion, so I personally suggest avoiding it's use with pregnant animals.


I believe that concentrated herbal oils tend to be much more dangerous then the fresh or dried plants themselves. When a webpage declares a plant unsafe, they are sometimes referring to studies done with extremely concentrated does. They may also be talking about dangers from consuming the fresh plant.
Unfortunately there is often no attempt to specify. :(


I'm just going to repeat this in case anyone missed it in the original post...
Anyone considering using any medicinal plant (or OTC chemical) to treat one of their animals should research it thoroughly beforehand.
 

michaels4gardens

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Zass":31erg93x said:
:thankyou:

I've been waiting for a thread like this!!!

I can add a little of what I've seen in my own herd too. :)
Raw shelled pumpkin seeds seemed to be effective in reducing pinworms to the point of them no longer being viable in intestines of processed kits out of a doe who had previously produced kits with visible parisites.

My rabbits enjoy eating both fresh or dried Tansy and Mugwort.

Once, we had a buck get loose and decimate a very large bunch of Tansy that I had been drying near his pen. I was a bit worried, since he had consumed a large dose of a plant that I only consider to be quasi safe. Thankfully, he didn't display any obvious side effects. Tansy is said to cause uterine contractions which may lead to abortion, so I personally suggest avoiding it's use with pregnant animals.


I believe that concentrated herbal oils tend to be much more dangerous then the fresh or dried plants themselves. When a webpage declares a plant unsafe, they are sometimes referring to studies done with extremely concentrated does. They may also be talking about dangers from consuming the fresh plant.
Unfortunately there is often no attempt to specify. :(


I'm just going to repeat this in case anyone missed it in the original post...
Anyone considering using any medicinal plant (or OTC chemical) to treat one of their animals should research it thoroughly beforehand.


I believe a little paranoia when it comes to rabbit feeds, and herbal treatments is understandable. I have read so much incorrect information on internet rabbit information sources, -- I find it more than a little disturbing- and my experience with pointing out these incorrect informational statements to places like R. H.S. , that post this kind of wild stuff, did not get any kind of positive or even rational response, let alone get any of them corrected, but instead brought on their personal attack for having the audacity to ask about their sources, or question their published information at all.

I have always been a very curious person, and have over the years been in the position to do a lot of research, my findings in many cases, do not support the rabbit information that is published. Garlic , [and onion family plants ] use in rabbit feed for medicinal purpose, is a prime example. - all allium family plants are listed on said rabbit site as extremely toxic.
---one can only wonder how research done on cats, or findings from injecting concentrates into body cavities of rabbits , could be used as "source " for this kind of conclusion.
 

Stephanie

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I found this very interesting. However, I have one question. Nearly all of the dosages mentioned were in reference to sheep or other large farm animals. Plus, I also realize that there are plants that are safe for some species, but not rabbits. Is this post meant to trigger research on the part of each breeder, rather than provide direction on what to feed as a wormer preventative? There are already several of the plants listed in my own rabbits' diet.
 

michaels4gardens

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Stephanie":3tftueko said:
I found this very interesting. However, I have one question. Nearly all of the dosages mentioned were in reference to sheep or other large farm animals. Plus, I also realize that there are plants that are safe for some species, but not rabbits. Is this post meant to trigger research on the part of each breeder, rather than provide direction on what to feed as a wormer preventative? There are already several of the plants listed in my own rabbits' diet.

I suppose.. that the point is - that worming is an important part of animal husbandry, and examples [like my use of garlic chives and wormwood, ] are meant to give some ideas of what is effective, and have been safely used. --
there is a lot of experienced rabbit people who read , post , as well as answer questions, and information on safe usage of many of these herbs can be had for the asking. also there is a list of "safe plants"

-- Fri Dec 25, 2015 8:40 pm --

MaggieJ":3tftueko said:
Very interesting and relevant information, Michael! I'll be coming back to this thread when I have had a chance to absorb more of the information.

A couple of additional sources that may be of interest:

http://eap.mcgill.ca/agrobio/ab370-04e.htm
http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=w ... 4Q&cad=rja

The first link is to the same document I copied and pasted some of the info above from, the second link is fantastic, [especially for those of us who also raise chickens]
thank you
 

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Thanks for this thread and to M4G and Maggie for taking time to find such helpful articles and posting info or links.(I am not so good at sifting through online info to find what is helpful :oops: )
Zass gives the helpful reminder not to use medicinal herbs or otc meds without understanding them and M4G advises having a regular schedule for treating parasites, understanding that even when you don't see them, they are still there.
We started gathering forage as part of our natural feeding program very soon after we started with rabbits and we already knew various plants that help keep worms in goats at an acceptable level. The more I read, the more I realize how many of the "weeds" we feed help reduce parasites as well as being nutritious feed. I've assumed that feeding a variety of them is a sufficient parasite treatment regimen and I haven't measured amounts or fed these plants on a particular schedule. Do any of you who are more experienced see a problem with that approach or have any suggestions for how it should be altered?
 

michaels4gardens

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so here is a note on my experience with "feeding" of the plants on this list + some.

Garlic , - I have fed garlic bulbs in small amounts when I did not have access to tops of any allium family plants, to rabbits with intestinal coccidiosis symptoms I just tossed the whole bulb [not just a clove] in the cage, and they would eat some, or all of it . Results were almost instantaneous for ending intestinal coccidiosis symptoms, I fed a new bulb when ever they had finished the one they had for a week, recovery for those rabbits who ate the garlic was complete. [sick rabbits who did not eat the garlic died]
I have fed green onion, garlic tops, and Garlic chives , 1 hand full, [= about a quarter to 50 cent size bunch ] 1 x /day for a month with no observable side effects, [the doe in this "EC study" is still alive and producing / weaning litters of 9 to 13, I don't know how old she is, but she was mature when I got her,[ so- she is at very least 4 years old] she has never had another kit with symptoms since the treatment, she was fed a hand full of garlic chives ] This same treatment has eliminated all observable hepatic coccidiosis symptoms from the rabbits with no re-infection noticed.[and I do butcher my own rabbits]
[because I know I have an residual intestinal coccidiosis infection in the soil on this farm, and I feed weeds and unwashed root crops].. It is my practice to feed Garlic Chives [or any allium plant tops if I have no chives] to all Does in their last week of pregnancy, and again in the 3rd or 4th week [or when ever I see kits beginning to leave the nest box. This practice eliminates almost all mortality in kits from nest box to 4 or 5 pounds, [that is when coccidiosis does its worst damage to a rabbit herd] I know that there is info on the internet and elsewhere, indicating that all allium plants are highly toxic to rabbits, as far as I can discover this is based on no applicable rabbit research, and-- there are some very reputable studies indicating that garlic is very safe when fed to rabbits vs., being injected.[in therapeutic amounts]

J Egy
Efficacy of garlic extract on hepatic coccidiosis in infected rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus): histological and biochemical studies
Toulah FH1, Al-Rawi MM.
Author information
Abstract
The rabbits were divided into three groups, of 12 rabbits each. G1 was the (non-infected non-treated) as control, G2 was the (infected-non treated), and G3 was the (infected and treated) rabbits. Each rabbit in the infected groups were given (10(3)) sporuleted oocysts of Eimeria stiedae per rabbit after forty five days exactly. Faecal sample of rabbits from each group were examined each day post infection till oocysts appeared in faeces. The treatment was given by using suitable dosage of garlic according to body weight. After 15, 21, 28, & 35 days post-treatment faecal oocysts were output. Biochemical parameters as serum liver function (ALT, AST, GGT & ALP) that denoted the he-patic cells injury. The results showed a significant differences in the mean values of oocysts shedding and their mean number in bile ducts between Gs 2 &3 from the 15th day post infection (PI) (mean +/-SD:40.33 +/- 16.72 & 25.17 +/- .56 respectively) till the experimental end on the 35th day (55.75 +/- 19.79 & 0.94 +/- 1.43 respectively). The histopathological alterations were in liver of G2 at the experimental end. Coccidiosis in G2 induced histopathological alterations in liver tissue, marked cytoplasmic vacuolations in hepatocytes with clear signs of karyolysis, and dilatation of sinusoids with increase in Kupffer cells. Leukocytic infiltration around congested blood vessels was noticed. Efficacy of garlic on E. stiedae in infected Gs was resident. The liver of G3 regained almost normal appearance compared to control.

Wormwood,(Artemisia absinthium) it is my practice to feed a heaping tablespoon of dried wormwood [cut and sifted vs. powder, if you are going to order it] To all of my breed stock each winter when I am not breeding anything [because there is no cheep weeds, and greens available for feed] I do this to kill any worms that may be in them. The rabbits will eat it all within a day or two, but not all at once. I would be reluctant to feed wormwood to a pregnant doe.

Lambsquarter, [Chenopodium album ] I feed large amounts of this common weed to my rabbits, however it is always fed with other greens that are "safe" like kale, carrot tops, along with what ever other weeds are pulled from the garden. Depending on the soil it is grown in, Lambsquarter can be very high in nitrates, and rabbits should have "other things" to move on to when they have had enough of this.

Conifers, I have fed pine branches to rabbits on occasion when they have nothing to chew on, or if they are "off feed" with no adverse effects noticed. It works well to get rabbits "back on feed" most of the time.

Juniper , I have fed juniper branches to rabbits with no ill effect, as something for them to chew on , or in an attempt to get rabbits "back on feed" I think it helped.

Sagebrush, [Big mountain Sage, Artemisia tridentate ] I have fed this to rabbits that were "off feed", as well as rabbits with coccidiosis symptoms, I think it works very well along with garlic Chives, when treating coccidiosis symptoms, [ to get rabbits well, and back on feed fast]. I have not noticed any negative effect from feeding a few big bunches of this to "sick" rabbits of any age, until they are back to a "normal" appetite . [large amounts for a prolonged time would be ill advised, and "probably" cause "toxic amounts" of some substances to be retained in the rabbit.

Grape leaves, from wild grapes, work well to get rabbits "back on feed", or "fix" random unidentified GI issues. I have fed large amounts of this for prolonged time periods, they love it and will readily eat large amounts. I have noticed no adverse effect.

Wild Yam leaves, [ Dioscorea alata, batatas, or bulbifera] .Rabbits readily eat large amounts if this with no negative effect noticed. It works well to "get rabbits back on feed" as well as treat GI issues.

so here is some of my experience...

-- Sat Dec 26, 2015 8:55 am --

Rainey":14t5jp8j said:
Thanks for this thread and to M4G and Maggie for taking time to find such helpful articles and posting info or links.(I am not so good at sifting through online info to find what is helpful :oops: )
Zass gives the helpful reminder not to use medicinal herbs or otc meds without understanding them and M4G advises having a regular schedule for treating parasites, understanding that even when you don't see them, they are still there.
We started gathering forage as part of our natural feeding program very soon after we started with rabbits and we already knew various plants that help keep worms in goats at an acceptable level. The more I read, the more I realize how many of the "weeds" we feed help reduce parasites as well as being nutritious feed. I've assumed that feeding a variety of them is a sufficient parasite treatment regimen and I haven't measured amounts or fed these plants on a particular schedule. Do any of you who are more experienced see a problem with that approach or have any suggestions for how it should be altered?

I have noticed worms being "expelled" after feeding wormwood to my rabbits, even though they had eaten a lot of plants that "helped with parasites". I have also seen ascarids [round worms], expelled after ivermectin was given to them. [and I had "wrongly assumed" they were already "clean".]

-- Sat Dec 26, 2015 9:50 am --

I did not comment on Pumpkin / squash seed, as some other people here have much more experience with it,[ as a treatment ].

-- Sun Dec 27, 2015 9:41 am --

also, when I lived in areas prone to bugs, I used ivermectin to control bugs, [fleas, lice, ear mites, etc..] it is just so much easier then anything else I have used.
 

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Is there any seasonal de-worming schedule or cleaning procedure... I know this may seem like basic info to the senior members but when I read the title I thought it was going to talk about preventive actions from deworming, cleaning, etc.. although the preventing thru feed is clearly one aspect to incorporate
 

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