Nursing?

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beanchild79

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Hi! I'm a first time angora owner (I have one french angora doe and one english angora buck), I'm 14 years old, and my doe just had a litter of 9 babies recently (oddly, she had one yesterday evening, and then the rest early this morning) and so far as I can tell she's being a great mama but since this is my first time (I should also clarify that this is my buck and doe's first times as well - both are about 9-10 months old) I don't want to make a dumb mistake. I'm not sure exactly how to make sure that my babies are getting fed, and are getting enough. I saw a thread that had pictures of kits that are fed and kits that arent and I tried it myself but then again, the doe only goes in a few times a day, correct? So then how much would i have to check? and would i have to check all of them? When I took one out to check, she/he got scared or something and took a wee on me. I told my mom and she said that that was a good sign that they were getting fed. But again, since this is my first time, I'm not sure and I dont want to get something wrong :/ Could anyone please help?
 

Fernie

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the doe only goes in a few times a day, correct? So then how much would i have to check?

Yes, they only nurse for a few minutes a few times a day. Many times they will hop out of the nest box when you arrive because in the wild they would lead a "predator" away from their nest and young to protect them. So I pretty much leave the Mama's alone.


and would i have to check all of them?

Check when you go to fill up their food and water. Babies should be fat and wiggly.


Could anyone please help?

Your Mom was correct. The reaction you received was a good sign she is taking care of her babies.
 

beanchild79

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@Fernie,
okay, that makes sense. thank you so much! :D
so far now all the babies have been nursing well (a few we needed to hold the mamas and then hold the babies up to them) though there have been a few tragedies; 5 out of 9 of mine have died either from getting out of the nest and freezing, or not having enough energy to suck.
thank you for your help!
 

a7736100

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I prefer to bring the expecting doe indoors during winter in a indoor cage. Once I had kits die even in mild temperatures in the 60's. They can't stand the chill when they are naked. Also if they are cold they won't feed.
 

Fernie

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beanchild79":3dp98ggt said:
@Fernie,
okay, that makes sense. thank you so much! :D
so far now all the babies have been nursing well (a few we needed to hold the mamas and then hold the babies up to them) though there have been a few tragedies; 5 out of 9 of mine have died either from getting out of the nest and freezing, or not having enough energy to suck.
thank you for your help!


Sorry for the losses. It happens. We usually fill the boxes with wood shavings or flakes. And I check on them every 3 hours around the clock. I have teenagers that like to stay up all night so they do the overnight checks every 2 hours on our outdoor rabbits. Rabbits are checked more when there is a sudden temperature change. We are having a drop in temps this week which will result in the teenagers and myself going out every hour to check on the livestock. It is going to get absolutely frigid for Kentucky next week.

I have a three strike rule for my rabbits. First timers get a pass on a loss of a litter. Now I do tend to watch the weather and I rarely breed before March. My usual breeding months are March - June and then September - November. I try not to have expecting mamas kindling in the heat of summer of the dead of Winter.
 

beanchild79

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a7736100":2tlq5cyq said:
I prefer to bring the expecting doe indoors during winter in a indoor cage. Once I had kits die even in mild temperatures in the 60's. They can't stand the chill when they are naked. Also if they are cold they won't feed.

yeah, I brought mine inside because it would be easier for me and my doe.

Fernie":2tlq5cyq said:
beanchild79":2tlq5cyq said:
@Fernie,
okay, that makes sense. thank you so much! :D
so far now all the babies have been nursing well (a few we needed to hold the mamas and then hold the babies up to them) though there have been a few tragedies; 5 out of 9 of mine have died either from getting out of the nest and freezing, or not having enough energy to suck.
thank you for your help!


Sorry for the losses. It happens. We usually fill the boxes with wood shavings or flakes. And I check on them every 3 hours around the clock. I have teenagers that like to stay up all night so they do the overnight checks every 2 hours on our outdoor rabbits. Rabbits are checked more when there is a sudden temperature change. We are having a drop in temps this week which will result in the teenagers and myself going out every hour to check on the livestock. It is going to get absolutely frigid for Kentucky next week.

I have a three strike rule for my rabbits. First timers get a pass on a loss of a litter. Now I do tend to watch the weather and I rarely breed before March. My usual breeding months are March - June and then September - November. I try not to have expecting mamas kindling in the heat of summer of the dead of Winter.

yeah, I'm down to 3 now. i think I'm done losing more tho- the remaining three are doing really well. thank you for your help!
:bunnyhop:
 
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