Need advice: My buck pulled fur & made a nest

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Rabbitry25613

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So before I go further into what happened this is most definitely a male rabbit he has bred my 2 does successfully a handful of times now. He shares a hutch with another buck and a doe— HOWEVER, this hutch has 3 separated parts and they cannot get to each other at all. It has full walls blocking them from each other. I’m sure he can smell the others though.

So, yesterday morning I went out and saw him stashing hay in his mouth. Thought it was just maybe a territorial thing, but I’ve never seen him do it before. I went out this morning and saw in his hay in the corner was pulled fur now too! He Looks healthy and isn’t acting strange otherwise. Have you ever experienced this? I’m pretty stumped.
- Why would a male rabbit do this and is this a cause for concern, health wise?1C022FEF-8CF0-4507-8065-39A69AC53FFA.jpeg
 

Rabbitry25613

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It would be impossible for my bunch; this buck that did the nesting only goes to one doe currently (because the other one hates him) and she has had 1 litter and about to have another from him. he also was bred to a different doe I had previously, and she had litters from him 2 times and that girl was never in contact with my other buck either.
It’s crazy, I could sex him again, but at this point what should I be looking for? (besides his male parts)
 

bighairbuns

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If you are sure it is a buck (and I'd say siring a litter is pretty darn sure!) the nesting behavior could be a sign of hormonal imbalance. Too much estradiol and not enough testosterone circulating in the system.

Hormone imbalances can be caused from stress, genetic predispositions, glandular tumors or being a physically intersex animal.

If you plan to keep using this buck, watch out for fertility issues in him and in his offspring. If it is a stress related thing, be aware that he and his progeny may not be so hardy as well.
 

Rabbitry25613

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If you are sure it is a buck (and I'd say siring a litter is pretty darn sure!) the nesting behavior could be a sign of hormonal imbalance. Too much estradiol and not enough testosterone circulating in the system.

Hormone imbalances can be caused from stress, genetic predispositions, glandular tumors or being a physically intersex animal.

If you plan to keep using this buck, watch out for fertility issues in him and in his offspring. If it is a stress related thing, be aware that he and his progeny may not be so hardy as well.
Okay thank you! I’m leaning toward something like this but don’t know much about any of it! Hard to find resources on this subject, if you know of any or could link any articles on this I would very much appreciate it!
 

KelleyBee

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I’ve had two completely unrelated bucks from two completely different breeds pull hair. But it was in the winter and cold and seemed a logical thing to do in my mind. They’ve both sired multiple litters before and after. Are you in a place going into winter? The other thought I have could be from boredom, as well. I think the hormonal imbalance is an intriguing thought. Maybe too much soy in the feed? However, with successful siring, I think it might be less likely. One last remote possibility is hormone related, as well. In humans, hormones can accumulate in the body’s fat stores. Perhaps the same for rabbits? Maybe up the hay intake and reduce pellets for a few weeks to trim the boy up a bit and see if that restores his behavioral balance.
 

PoppyLapine

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I agree with everyone about it being hormonal imbalance as well. But I want to share an exsperiance I had with some rats. It's very unlikely this could be the case with your buck, but weird things happen.
So my sisters and I grew up owning rats. One time we went out and picked 3 juvenile males, that way they can share a cage. And if you have ever seen a male rat, its very obvious its a male. Once they grew into full adults, one of them started to get really fat, we thought he was just getting to many snacks or something. Well, that wasn't the case. He gave birth to a healthy litter of 9. It turns out our obvious male was actually a hermaphrodite and had fully working female parts along with the male parts.
As I said, very unlikely for your buck. But when I was reading your post it caused me to recall those rats, lol!
 

Rabbitry25613

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I’ve had two completely unrelated bucks from two completely different breeds pull hair. But it was in the winter and cold and seemed a logical thing to do in my mind. They’ve both sired multiple litters before and after. Are you in a place going into winter? The other thought I have could be from boredom, as well. I think the hormonal imbalance is an intriguing thought. Maybe too much soy in the feed? However, with successful siring, I think it might be less likely. One last remote possibility is hormone related, as well. In humans, hormones can accumulate in the body’s fat stores. Perhaps the same for rabbits? Maybe up the hay intake and reduce pellets for a few weeks to trim the boy up a bit and see if that restores his behavioral balance.
Going into warmer weather over here. I thought maybe boredom could play a part although I’ve never seen him act such a way. Thanks for the advice! I will look more into his food/diet and see if switching it around helps him. He is a standard Rex and is around 9Ibs last I checked, maybe he is getting more bored, but he did just breed 2 does last month so I’m really not quite sure
 

RabbitsOfTheCreek

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I agree with everyone about it being hormonal imbalance as well. But I want to share an exsperiance I had with some rats. It's very unlikely this could be the case with your buck, but weird things happen.
So my sisters and I grew up owning rats. One time we went out and picked 3 juvenile males, that way they can share a cage. And if you have ever seen a male rat, its very obvious its a male. Once they grew into full adults, one of them started to get really fat, we thought he was just getting to many snacks or something. Well, that wasn't the case. He gave birth to a healthy litter of 9. It turns out our obvious male was actually a hermaphrodite and had fully working female parts along with the male parts.
As I said, very unlikely for your buck. But when I was reading your post it caused me to recall those rats, lol!
He had his own babies lol
 

Nibbles

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Just curious here. Any updates on your buck's behavior? :)
 
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I agree with everyone about it being hormonal imbalance as well. But I want to share an exsperiance I had with some rats. It's very unlikely this could be the case with your buck, but weird things happen.
So my sisters and I grew up owning rats. One time we went out and picked 3 juvenile males, that way they can share a cage. And if you have ever seen a male rat, its very obvious its a male. Once they grew into full adults, one of them started to get really fat, we thought he was just getting to many snacks or something. Well, that wasn't the case. He gave birth to a healthy litter of 9. It turns out our obvious male was actually a hermaphrodite and had fully working female parts along with the male parts.
As I said, very unlikely for your buck. But when I was reading your post it caused me to recall those rats, lol!
That is fascinating! I wonder if his male parts were functional as well? That is astronomically rare for mammals!
 

PoppyLapine

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That is fascinating! I wonder if his male parts were functional as well? That is astronomically rare for mammals!
When it happened we were just kids and thought it was weird and kinda cool. But now, years later, me and my family regret not testing that out and placing them with a female to see if they were also working parts.
 

Rabbitry25613

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Just curious here. Any updates on your buck's behavior? :)
Unfortunately nothings new! He is acting completely normal. I have however, cut his pellets in half and have been giving him more hay (to slim him down just a bit) I’ve given some willow and such to eat here and there, and some more ACV in his water to see if he just needed some extra system support as well. Definitely not going to write it off as a day of boredom, I want to make sure he doesn’t have any actual issues, but as of right now not sure what else to do to figure that out. Only time will tell I suppose! Just going to continue keeping a sharp eye on him!
 

Nibbles

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Unfortunately nothings new! He is acting completely normal. I have however, cut his pellets in half and have been giving him more hay (to slim him down just a bit) I’ve given some willow and such to eat here and there, and some more ACV in his water to see if he just needed some extra system support as well. Definitely not going to write it off as a day of boredom, I want to make sure he doesn’t have any actual issues, but as of right now not sure what else to do to figure that out. Only time will tell I suppose! Just going to continue keeping a sharp eye on him!
Cool, thanks for the reply.
 
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