Just so you no.....

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Jenna-Bun

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Hi Guys,
I just want to say Bunbun my rabbit lives outdoors! I don't like rabbit owners that have small shelters-cages for there rabbit, feel free to share your rabbits home. (Not trying to be mean) I think you should adopt a rabbit, Just take good care of it.
Thanks,
 

arachyd

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Outdoors in a hutch or outdoors loose? Rabbits aren't safe on the loose.
 

Preitler

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All my rabbits are outside during day, and currently 20 of 22 in hutches during the night, the other two in the house. It really depends on local climate and fauna what measures need to be taken - although there are some kind of botflies native here flystrike in rabbits is pretty much unheard of here. Actually, the only Issue I had in 9 years were ear and fur mites, each once, and easily treated. No coccidosis whatsoever, seems climate here doesn't support it.

I don't even have a real fence apart that around the hutches, wouldn't do much good against foxes and marten anyway. And with lots of predators and no wild rabbit population I'm pretty lucky regarding diseases, here in a small side valley between alps and balkan.

I lost one buck after an fox attack 5 years ago, didn't get him, but due to shock, and that fox also got 4 growouts out of a hutch while I was in the US over christmas, well, that mange ridden fox is history now. There is the risk that something like that happens again, but I chose to live with it, and react when problems occur.
A wildlife camera placed around the property to see what is sneaking up is the most useful tool ever.
 
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Jenna-Bun

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All my rabbits are outside during day, and currently 20 of 22 in hutches during the night, the other two in the house. It really depends on local climate and fauna what measures need to be taken - although there are some kind of botflies native here flystrike in rabbits is pretty much unheard of here. Actually, the only Issue I had in 9 years were ear and fur mites, each once, and easily treated. No coccidosis whatsoever, seems climate here doesn't support it.

I don't even have a real fence apart that around the hutches, wouldn't do much good against foxes and marten anyway. And with lots of predators and no wild rabbit population I'm pretty lucky regarding diseases, here in a small side valley between alps and balkan.

I lost one buck after an fox attack 5 years ago, didn't get him, but due to shock, and that fox also got 4 growouts out of a hutch while I was in the US over christmas, well, that mange ridden fox is history now. There is the risk that something like that happens again, but I chose to live with it, and react when problems occur.
A wildlife camera placed around the property to see what is sneaking up is the most useful tool ever.
Okay, Is there anyway I can make him safer? I can not bring him in my house, There is to much noise, Some other pets, And I have no spot for him! And I have a good lock
 

Preitler

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Well, as I said, be aware of your surroundings, a wildlife camera really helps a lot. Make his night time hutch sturdy enough, chicken wire doesn't even stand up to rats, and include at least one hidey house or such where he can get out of sight completly. A good fence is actually quite a deterrent. I just can talk about foxes, the local martens, much to my surprise, never were any problem to me (fences are completly useless against them). There was just one fox willing to go inside the fence, the others were too shy or were driven off by the rabbits stamping (Camera footage). I trapped that one problematic mange ridden fox inside the fence and killed it, I had rigged a siren to the trap door to get it before it could get out. The healthy ones do a great job keeping meeces and rats under control, even if I ever lose a rabbit to one of those out on the meadow I will not hunt it down, that's the risk I take knowingly.
 
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