Is there rigor after thawing when the meat was frozen fresh?

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Preitler

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I would like to simplyfie things, and I didn't notice much difference in texture with what I did until now, letting them sit in salty water for appr. 3 days in the fridge.

Last year something got me destracted, lost count of the days and eventually froze them after 5 days, but they were spoiled when I thawed them. So I prefer to just let the carcass cool to room temperature, and then freezing right away.

Anybody done both ways, is the extra step worth it in your opinion?

And would rigor set in after thawing? I would think not, since it doesn't have much time to do that anyway since it get's cooked as soon as it's thawed.
 
Mine go into the freezer immediately or into the pressure cooker and then pot or freezer. From freezer into pressure cooker ...
So i don't know about rigor, it doesn't have time for that.
 
I would like to simplyfie things, and I didn't notice much difference in texture with what I did until now, letting them sit in salty water for appr. 3 days in the fridge.

Last year something got me destracted, lost count of the days and eventually froze them after 5 days, but they were spoiled when I thawed them. So I prefer to just let the carcass cool to room temperature, and then freezing right away.

Anybody done both ways, is the extra step worth it in your opinion?

And would rigor set in after thawing? I would think not, since it doesn't have much time to do that anyway since it get's cooked as soon as it's thawed.
I used to always put them directly into the freezer, before rigor set in. The rabbits were butchered and quartered, the quarters went into ice-cold water in stock pots, which were brought into the house and the meat immediately put into sealed bags and into the freezer. It is my impression that the freezing resulted in tenderizing the meat in a way similar to ageing. As long as the meat went directly into the freezer, I didn't have any trouble with chewiness.

The only hitch is that according to some of the reading I've done, freezing the meat during rigor can compromise the quality. Rabbit meat is different than beef in several ways, but here is an interesting article regarding what happens to muscle as it becomes meat:
https://thefooduntold.com/food-science/meat-science-what-is-rigor-mortis/
Now that I can or cook most of the meat, I let the carcasses sit in water in the fridge for 3-6 days. I'm surprised to hear your meat was spoiled after 5 days!
 
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I would like to simplyfie things, and I didn't notice much difference in texture with what I did until now, letting them sit in salty water for appr. 3 days in the fridge.

Last year something got me destracted, lost count of the days and eventually froze them after 5 days, but they were spoiled when I thawed them. So I prefer to just let the carcass cool to room temperature, and then freezing right away.

Anybody done both ways, is the extra step worth it in your opinion?

And would rigor set in after thawing? I would think not, since it doesn't have much time to do that anyway since it get's cooked as soon as it's thawed.
I used to always go straight to freezer, and my meat was pretty tough. I now chill in an extra cold (just above freezing) fridge for 3-5 days dry, wrapped in plastic. I wash them pretty well before they go in to chill and I have not had trouble with losing meat to spoilage, and to me it is more tender. I typically joint the rabbit before I put it in the freezer as well, so it just nicely breaks up my work day to harvest on one day and cut and wrap on another.

But the last time I froze without resting was years ago, and I have also gotten better at both growing and cooking rabbit since then. So I am not sure what factor is the biggest--I think you should probably just do what makes you happy--after all, "tough" is subjective. If you like it without resting, and you are the one eating it, then I think that is all that really matters?
 
This last harvest it was super cold outside. I put rabbits or birds in a big cooler with ice as I process each one. Then I just put a cement block on top b/c everyone loves chicken (and rabbit, if they’ve tried it). The cooler isn’t to keep them cold; it’s to keep them from freezing.

In warmer weather, I’ve been putting them in my huge kneading bowl in the extra fridge and covering them with a tea towel or two. I pour off the juices that accumulate at the bottom every day and leave them in there for two or three days. They’re still stiff. I work the joints, which loosens them up so that I can get them into the curled-up position I prefer for vacuum sealing, then freeze. I haven’t had any issues with toughness, but I always cook in my slow-cooker, since that’s my preference in any case.
 
Well, that'll be interesting then. I just did let them cool down, and froze them. I'll tell my experience when cooking them, but that's going to be next year.

I mostly do stuff like Lasagne, Chili Con Carne, Szegediner Goulash etc. anyway, so it shouldn't be too bad.
 

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