Is it possible to "band" a buck to neuter ?

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HOWsMom

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I grew up with cattle, so we used bands to castrate the young males.
Is this possible for rabbits ?
Their 'bits' don't dangle like a bull so I'm not sure.

I have googled it, and I've gotten very mixed information - everything from "never ever do this" to "this is how it's done, and it's easy".

We have 2 bucks that are strictly pets, one who is fairly aggressive and has taken to spraying (he'll be a year old in a couple weeks, and this is a new thing). There are precious few vets around with ANY experience with rabbits.
 

KenoshaRabbits

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HOWsMom":2c28gzr9 said:
I grew up with cattle, so we used bands to castrate the young males.
Is this possible for rabbits ?
Their 'bits' don't dangle like a bull so I'm not sure.

I have googled it, and I've gotten very mixed information - everything from "never ever do this" to "this is how it's done, and it's easy".

We have 2 bucks that are strictly pets, one who is fairly aggressive and has taken to spraying (he'll be a year old in a couple weeks, and this is a new thing). There are precious few vets around with ANY experience with rabbits.

Here is an earlier thread about the subject of castration:

castrating-rabbits-t4057-30.html?hilit=band castrate#p171995

I've heard mixed info as well. If you're looking for a non-surgical method you might be out of luck. I may be wrong but I get the impression you and your family are attached to your bucks. Based on that assumption, I think you might rather wait for this phase to hopefully pass. You guys seem like you might take it badly if that option messed up your rabbits.

Dealing with young bucks is just one of those prices you have to pay sometimes. Or the price is a few hundred to a vet.
 

Dood

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No

Rabbits are unique in that their inguninal canal does not close so the vet must suture it shut to ensure the bladder or intestines don't herniate out as the testicles are no longer there to prevent this

They also have a substantial muscle attached that allows them to pull up the testes, horses and dogs have a similar muscle, and banding is NOT permitted in these species because of the pain associated with constriction of these muscles

Banding is only done on animals with pendulous testes and at a very young age and part of the reason it works is because they are RAPIDLY growing and they quickly out grow the band and the testes drop off
 

KenoshaRabbits

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Also from a logical perspective; if it were possible (i.e., successfully castrate a buck via banding; not just the ability to put some rubber bands around his testicles) we as a community would probably heard about it a lot more than just the "word on the street" anecdotal stories.

And not to sound condescending; but house rabbit people would have been all over that method as a cheap, non-surgical, way to neuter bucks if it existed.
 

akane

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I've talked to people who have done it. It can be done. Whether it's safe is questionable and whether it's ethical is just as questionable. Overall I'd only do it in a situation where I am turning this potentially nice personal pet (not to be sold) into dog food for recent behavior changes if he doesn't improve. Maybe. There are things I'd rather put an animal down for than cause the amount of discomfort or physical alteration needed to make them a good house pet.
 

Kwhairr

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Have castrated 9 week old rabbits & dwarfs at that! Sat up on their butts by a “holder” they give me way more trouble clipping nails! I’ve castrated thousands of piglets so it’s virtually the same. Good sharp, new hook blade scalpel and it’s textbook just like I’ve read. Takes seconds and they give very little reaction. No blood and heals very quickly. I disinfect with iodine. I hold them isolated for a couple of days and check on the wound and if all is healed, eating well, they are ready for homes. It’s very fast and no risk of anesthesia. This would be perfect for growers. Do scrape the cord versus clean cutting.
 

Kwhairr

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I've talked to people who have done it. It can be done. Whether it's safe is questionable and whether it's ethical is just as questionable. Overall I'd only do it in a situation where I am turning this potentially nice personal pet (not to be sold) into dog food for recent behavior changes if he doesn't improve. Maybe. There are things I'd rather put an animal down for than cause the amount of discomfort or physical alteration needed to make them a good house pet.
It’s way faster than you’d think and they actually don’t squirm nearly as much as nail clipping
 

Rabbits by Accident

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It’s way faster than you’d think and they actually don’t squirm nearly as much as nail clipping
I'd have to see photos. But I'd probably never do it because I either breed them or eat them. After they're sold for pets, it's up to the owner to deal with. :D

They do cattle that way. They just slit it open, pull out the parts and I'm not sure they even suture them, but if the person is capable the cows don't even seem to notice.

(you could have tiny "rocky mountain oysters")
 

ladysown

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I'd have to see photos. But I'd probably never do it because I either breed them or eat them. After they're sold for pets, it's up to the owner to deal with. :D

They do cattle that way. They just slit it open, pull out the parts and I'm not sure they even suture them, but if the person is capable the cows don't even seem to notice.

(you could have tiny "rocky mountain oysters")
Oh, but I laughed "tiny rocky mountain oysters". Thank you, needed a laugh today. :)
 

MaggieJ

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Anyone thinking of trying home castrating of rabbits, please think again!

You would be putting your rabbit at great risk. This is a job for a veterinarian. Dood -- who posted upthread -- is extremely knowledgeable and her post is worth reading again. It's post #3 in this thread,
 

eco2pia

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I have castrated many things. With and without anesthesia, using surgical and nonsurgical methods. I admit that I suspect @Kwhairr is right about the lack of pain reaction in a young rabbit, but I would not skip sutures in this case. It would increase the risk of a hernia. And I would not suture a conscious animal. It requires too much precision and I am good and fast, but not that good, and not that fast.
 

Kwhairr

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I will try to post pictures next time: there is so much similarities between the control they have over their testicular position and piglets. Now these mind you are not mature bucks who have already developed “habits/behaviors” and who have had testosterone mold them for some time. It probably would not curb unwanted actions…. Or it would take time ? Early is probably best. Banding seems impossible due to how closely they retain them plus the extreme amount of pressure it would take to pull the testicle up and secure a band. Plus they can reach around and chew at it which is a huge problem in my mind. I so far have found no indication that they will rupture ( hernia) but I’ve not seen everything so I can’t say 100%. It may be the nightmare fights leading to eviscerations along with castrations that people may assume happens also during a routine castration. I don’t know. Just passing along what I am seeing!
 

Kwhairr

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I'd have to see photos. But I'd probably never do it because I either breed them or eat them. After they're sold for pets, it's up to the owner to deal with. :D

They do cattle that way. They just slit it open, pull out the parts and I'm not sure they even suture them, but if the person is capable the cows don't even seem to notice.

(you could have tiny "rocky mountain oysters")
😜
 

eco2pia

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I will try to post pictures next time: there is so much similarities between the control they have over their testicular position and piglets. Now these mind you are not mature bucks who have already developed “habits/behaviors” and who have had testosterone mold them for some time. It probably would not curb unwanted actions…. Or it would take time ? Early is probably best. Banding seems impossible due to how closely they retain them plus the extreme amount of pressure it would take to pull the testicle up and secure a band. Plus they can reach around and chew at it which is a huge problem in my mind. I so far have found no indication that they will rupture ( hernia) but I’ve not seen everything so I can’t say 100%. It may be the nightmare fights leading to eviscerations along with castrations that people may assume happens also during a routine castration. I don’t know. Just passing along what I am seeing!
I have looked pretty carefully during harvest at where and how they are attached internally. I feel like if you are careful not to pull too hard at the vas deferens they could be ok, as the abdominal wall is barely penetrated, and surgically you don't need to go near it.

I was thinking of mice, which yeah, I have castrated. Under anesthesia.

The issue I have had with mice is that they can chew at the incision, and they have a fatpad similar to the fat near and around rabbit testes. If they succeed in opening the incision, the fat pad will often protrude, allowing inflammation and infection. Later in life these mice *seem* (anecdotally) to have increased risk of spontaneous rectal prolapse, which is a straight trip to euthanasia.

Since the only reason I can see for neutering a rabbit is to make it a pet, I would be concerned about potentially shortening the lifespan. I am purely speculating. I could be completely out in left field. I have no direct knowledge of rabbit castration specifically.
 

Rabbits by Accident

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I have looked pretty carefully during harvest at where and how they are attached internally. I feel like if you are careful not to pull too hard at the vas deferens they could be ok, as the abdominal wall is barely penetrated, and surgically you don't need to go near it.

I was thinking of mice, which yeah, I have castrated. Under anesthesia.

The issue I have had with mice is that they can chew at the incision, and they have a fatpad similar to the fat near and around rabbit testes. If they succeed in opening the incision, the fat pad will often protrude, allowing inflammation and infection. Later in life these mice *seem* (anecdotally) to have increased risk of spontaneous rectal prolapse, which is a straight trip to euthanasia.

Since the only reason I can see for neutering a rabbit is to make it a pet, I would be concerned about potentially shortening the lifespan. I am purely speculating. I could be completely out in left field. I have no direct knowledge of rabbit castration specifically.
Castrating mice? That is an interesting visual ... I guess you use a teeny tiny knife.
 
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