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Tom in Kingman

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Since I am going to set aside a special area for my "wabbits" I can determine the enviorment . It seems that they will tolerate the kind of cold that we get in Northern AZ but there is more . I intend to grow worms in the manure pits to be kept under the cages . Worms are happy (and PRODUCTIVE) at 70 -75 degrees .I have read on this very informative forum that rabbits tend to "shut down" at 85 degrees . So the question begs . What temp. has been found to be best for the rabbits ? We'll see if we can't come up with some kind of climate that will serve both . My entire project is with a symbionic goal in mind . In order for one to be worth the effort both must perform . Between the mats you might see in a commercial greenhouse that have thermostats and a solar exhaust fan I might be able to keep one temp at the bottom and another at the top providing the spread is not too much . If it matters we are talking Californians and or New Zealands . The worms in question (thank you for asking) will be European Nightcrawlers .They will be for sale to fishers and also will work in the garden and greenhouse .Thank you in advance for your time in this matter .
 

Frosted Rabbits

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You can use air flow over soil to decrease the ambient air temp that the rabbits are in. Generally, while the air temp is at 75 degrees, the soil temp , if worms are present, is lower. It has only been in the 30s and 40s here during the day, And I am finding active worms when I turn over soil-- soil that is literally icy cold!!!
Using rabbit droppings as food for worms will help keep heat from building up, especially if the worms are numerous enough to quickly break down the droppings. Remember, though, that you need to make sure the urine does not get too concentrated under the cages. In cooler temps, letting droppings build up, and having them warm up will provide heat for the worms to stay active. Just remember this, too-- some worms are not happy when confined--so make sure your starter stock of worms is of the right subspecies/variety!
 
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