How is covid 19 effecting everything?

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golden rabbitry

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So I live in nor cal and haven't had babies since my Christmas litters. My main question is how is covid 19 effecting the rabbit market for pets around you guys? do you think it'd be smart to breed or wait until this is all over?
I sell hollands but right now my only doe is a mutt so holland mixes? Any prediction how they'd sell?
 

michaels4gardens

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Here, -lots of people here are still afraid ,and the economy is depressed.
I suppose, with the easing of restrictions, and availability of more "real " info,
things will return to "normal" fairly soon.
I would keep watch for another month, and see how your area is doing, before I would breed for pets.
JMHO ...
 

ladysown

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i am selling out of everything I list within four days of listing. (Ontario). Still lots of fear around. Me, I'm just fed up with it all.
 

KimitsuKouseki

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I've stopped selling myself, Since december I've had some really bad customer experiences wich has left me very sour. Also, my health is rly poor and just a normal cold sends me to the hospital in an ambulance.... I have the advantage that whatever I dont sell, I eat so it's not a problem for me. I don't know when I'll start selling again, maybe next year, but no sooner, I need a break from horrible customers.....
As for Covid, I'd be worried people would buy one cause they are stuck at home bored atm and have time only to end up neglecting or abandonning the rabbit once normal life picks up again and they realise they can't care for it normally. So if you do sell, make sure to check their reasons to get one and ensure they'll care for it after.
 

Zass

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I'm not selling my meat rabbits right now, cause there are too many people with no genuine interest in rabbits trying to jump in too far too fast due to food insecurity fears. (which may be genuine!) I do appreciate the interest, and will be happy to help people get started on raising meat rabbits, and help teach about natural forages in a few months when the fear has hopefully died down a bit.
 

KimitsuKouseki

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Zass":1mlj6exo said:
I'm not selling my meat rabbits right now, cause there are too many people with no genuine interest in rabbits trying to jump in too far too fast due to food insecurity fears. (which may be genuine!) I do appreciate the interest, and will be happy to help people get started on raising meat rabbits, and help teach about natural forages in a few months when the fear has hopefully died down a bit.
yup, basically what I meant too, but some people might react by saying "oh I'll get any breed insted" and raise em for meat anyways, I do lionheads and a few english angoras afterall.... So that why even pet rabbits are at risk of people acting like that.
 

Zass

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KimitsuKouseki":1du17rgy said:
Zass":1du17rgy said:
I'm not selling my meat rabbits right now, cause there are too many people with no genuine interest in rabbits trying to jump in too far too fast due to food insecurity fears. (which may be genuine!) I do appreciate the interest, and will be happy to help people get started on raising meat rabbits, and help teach about natural forages in a few months when the fear has hopefully died down a bit.
yup, basically what I meant too, but some people might react by saying "oh I'll get any breed insted" and raise em for meat anyways, I do lionheads and a few english angoras afterall.... So that why even pet rabbits are at risk of people acting like that.

My concern is mostly towards what happens when people half-heartely try to raise livestock of any kind, but it seems, especially rabbits. Over-breeding, crowding or improper housing, inadequate shelter and care, and finally, improper "disposal" methods when people decide they no longer want involved. It's always a bit of an issue, but the last thing we need are larger amounts of feral abandoned rabbits in the US right now.
 

ladysown

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I haven't found that people are any nuttier this year than any other year. Everyone that I have sold a bunny to is just like other years. Some people you turn down, others have been looking for just the right bun for a while, and others just want a bunny now as opposed to in the summer as the kids are home now. Timing might be different, but the people are the same.

I'll turn you down if it's obvious you know nothing and haven't even tried.

But otherwise, I'll let you have the bunny you have your eye on and have paid for.
 

hotzcatz

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My neighbor just mentioned our local Costco was out of pork and chicken. I'd suspect meat rabbits - especially if they're already ready for the freezer - would be selling really well right not. Also breeding pairs due to food insecurity. Maybe their reasons for starting with rabbits is a little suspect, but maybe they'll stick with it when things normalized a bit? If not, they can always eat them when they want to get out of rabbits.

I've not been listing them for sale and have had a few inquiries about breeding pairs. Usually folks just want one or two for fiber animals since all I have are English Angoras. They can eat them if they want, but a small rabbit at $50 each isn't likely to become dinner.

There were a couple inquires before Easter, but when they found out there wouldn't be any available until after Easter, those folks went away. I don't sell angora rabbits as pets and definitely don't sell them as Easter basket filler. They can either eat them (which they don't since they're too expensive) or harvest their wool and make yarn.
 

michaels4gardens

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CV19 [or whatever]

and....my opinion...

you should do your own research...and take responsibility for your own health..

because, ...I was not tested for CV19 in March, and I tested negative for the antibodies later on [ same as 95% of the "confirmed cases" do]

I also got "it" again 3 months later,[still recovering] but not nearly as bad this time, so ,..I "probably", still haven't developed much in the way of antibodies.

with that said...

I have discovered that lomatium/dandelion root tincture is effective in stopping progress of the infection within a couple of hours...then, "apparently" eliminating it after a couple days of use.

recipe approximations : 8 oz dried lomatium root [C/S or ground]

4 oz dandelion root {CS] [to help strengthen immune system, reduce negative effects of lomatium]

1/2 gallon 40% vodka. sit for 2 + weeks, in dark place

"my dosage" [ascertained by muscle testing] was 4 to 6 oz 3X .

- my doses were about 12 hours apart.

[note ,: my dosage amounts, are far greater than the "recommended" dosages]

[lomatium root was effective against the 1918 spanish "flu"]

{My symptoms were CV19 "typical"]

------------------
Lomatium dissectum
Lomatium was almost a lost herb, but once it was well known. Thought you’d be interested in this original article about it. I decocted it for a few hours—skimming the foam constantly—before tincturing it to hopefully avoid the rash (take with dandelion and/or other detox herbs to help avoid it).
Bulletin of the Nevada State Board of Health , No. 1 , Carson City, Nevada , January, 1920
AN INDIAN REMEDY FOR INFLUENZA
In publishing this paper the State Board of Health does not give its endorsement to the remedy until it has had further trial. We merely present the facts as stated by Dr. Krebs, with the idea of giving the matter publicity and encouraging others to give it a trial.
During the fall of 1918 when the influenza epidemic visited this section of Nevada, the Washoe Indian used a root in the treatment of their sick which was gathered along the foot-hills of this slope of the Sierra. The plant proved to be a rare species of the parsley family (Leptotaemia dissecta*), according to a report from the University of California.
The Indians gather this root in the late fall, November being considered the proper month for gathering. The root is used in the fresh or dry state. It is cut up and a decoction is made by boiling the root in water, skimming off the top and giving large doses of the broth. A pound of root is considered about the proper dose to treat a case of fever for three days, which is the longest time needed to break up a fever due to influenza or a pulmonary disease, although the Washoes used it as a panacea. Whether a coincidence or not, there was not a single death in the Washoe tribe from influenza or its complications, although Indians living in other parts of the State where the root did not grow died in numbers. It was such a remarkable coincidence that the root was investigated by a practicing physician who saw apparently hopeless cases recover without any other medication or care of any kind. A preparation was prepared and employed in a great many cases among the whites, from the mildest to the most virulent types of influenza, and it proved, among other things, that it is the nearest approach we have today to a specific in epidemic influenza and the accompanying pneumonia. Where used early it proved itself to be a reliable agent in preventing pulmonary complications. Other physicians were induced to give it a trial, with the same results. It is beyond the experimental stage, as its therapeutic action in this direction is established and beyond any doubt. The cases in which it has been used run into the hundreds. There is probably no therapeutic agent so valuable in the treatment of influenzal pneumonia and, as far as being tried, in ordinary lobar pneumonia if started early. Its action on coughs is more certain than the opiate expectorants and its benefit is lasting. It acts as a powerful tonic to the respiratory mucous membranes. It is a bronchial, intestinal and urinary antiseptic and is excreted by these organs. It seems to stimulate the pneogastries (sic) and causes a slow pulse with increased volume and reduced tension. It is a pronounced diaphoretic and somewhat diuretic, and it is a stimulating and sedative expectorant. In large doses it is a laxative, and in extreme doses emetic.
To make a therapeutically active preparation, the proper variety of the root must be selected in the late fall and properly cured out of the sun. Its active principles must be extracted with as little as possible of the objectionable constituents. The active principles of the root are decidedly complex. It contains a glucoside (as its solutions precipitate copper from Fehling's solution). It contains one or more alkaloids and an acid analogous to benzoic acid, one or more volatile and fixed oils, a resin and a gum. It can be seen from this that it resembles a balsam from the fact that it contains an oleogumresin and an acid besides alkaloids and glucosides. One can at once appreciate the fact that a reliable pharmaceutical preparation representing the action of the root is not readily made. The volatile oil, which is one of the principal therapeutic agents, is lost in making a decoction.
This particular variety of Leptotaemia* is not as common as believed as some, and it is this particular variety that has medicinal or therapeutic virtues. It grows in dry sandy soil, as a rule, under or between tall sagebrush or greasewood. The plant grows from two to four feet high and has a blossom similar to wild parsnip and leaves like a carrot. It is a perennial, and the older roots frequently weigh from two to six pounds. It sprouts early in April, blooms in May, seeds in June, and withers in July. A number of trials in transplanting the root have been made, but none were successful.
Leptotaemia dissecta * is destined to become one of the most useful if not the most important addition to our vegetable materia medica.
ERNST T. KREBS, M.D. Carson City, Nevada.
(Name changed later to *Lomatium dissectum)
 

Ghost

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Zass":sk5sj4y1 said:
I'm not selling my meat rabbits right now, cause there are too many people with no genuine interest in rabbits trying to jump in too far too fast due to food insecurity fears. (which may be genuine!) I do appreciate the interest, and will be happy to help people get started on raising meat rabbits, and help teach about natural forages in a few months when the fear has hopefully died down a bit.

That is the thing. Raising rabbits CAN be a hedge against food insecurity, But there is a BIG but. Raising rabbits can be a net plus or a net drain. I'm sure their are many people here on RT who find meat rabbits is a net plus in there food budget. But you have to be SERIOUS at rabbits to make it a plus. As for me when I was "doing the meat rabbit thing" with my neighbors we were just dabbling in it. Considering what we put in on it it would have been cheaper to by "regular" meat (not Whole Foods organic) if the only thing we were looking was to provide meat. However I was more interested in what it was "like" to raise your own food and "meat the meat" so to speak.

If your main interest is a meat source that will be a net financial plus you better be willing to put in the effort (along with your whole family) long term. Also growing or collecting fodder for buns will reduce overhead. If you want to just dabble in meat rabbits you need to know it will cost you more $ than just buying meat. If you are looking for the "experience" it could be worth it. But just know what you are getting into.

In normal times, unless someone has previous livestock experience, I would suggest dabbling for a year. Let them know that while dabbling it will be a net drain. Then decide if you want to go all in or give it up. They may decide that dabbling is what they prefer to do. While dabbling, you can tighten up cost, but they need to know that meat rabbits will not be a significant plus as long as they continue to dabble.
 

hotzcatz

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Well, now we are month #4-ish into the Time of Covid, although that depends on when it started to affect things in your area, of course.

Folks around here are still asking for bunnies, I've not advertised them and have a waiting list for them. They say they're gonna keep them as fiber animals and make yarn. Not sure about that, but it at least sounds good. There's been quite a few requests for pets, but I don't sell them to pet owner since it never turns out well.

Seems like Covid has had something to do with shipping to the island. We are now only getting one weekly barge, I think, instead of the usual two. The feed store has been out of the usual high protein rabbit pellets. That's the only type they bring in, actually, but they've been out of them for a week and there won't be any in until next week. I don't really like feeding dry COB, but the bunnies had some of that mixed in with alfalfa pellets last week. Now they're eating timothy pellets with rolled barley and black oil sunflower seeds. Lots of forage, too. At least that doesn't have to be shipped in.
 

golden rabbitry

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I've gotten way more offers and questions and I have no ads out. Yet half of them are people who have done no research and don't even know what breeds they want. Someone this morning asked if I had "dwarf lops". Apparently they meant mini lops but I am strictly a holland breeder and only advertise as. Not sure where these people find me. None of it started till covid. Maybe they're bored kids?
 

DoozyWombat

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Ghost":1jkorox0 said:
Zass":1jkorox0 said:
I'm not selling my meat rabbits right now, cause there are too many people with no genuine interest in rabbits trying to jump in too far too fast due to food insecurity fears. (which may be genuine!) I do appreciate the interest, and will be happy to help people get started on raising meat rabbits, and help teach about natural forages in a few months when the fear has hopefully died down a bit.

That is the thing. Raising rabbits CAN be a hedge against food insecurity, But there is a BIG but. Raising rabbits can be a net plus or a net drain. I'm sure their are many people here on RT who find meat rabbits is a net plus in there food budget. But you have to be SERIOUS at rabbits to make it a plus. As for me when I was "doing the meat rabbit thing" with my neighbors we were just dabbling in it. Considering what we put in on it it would have been cheaper to by "regular" meat (not Whole Foods organic) if the only thing we were looking was to provide meat. However I was more interested in what it was "like" to raise your own food and "meat the meat" so to speak.

If your main interest is a meat source that will be a net financial plus you better be willing to put in the effort (along with your whole family) long term. Also growing or collecting fodder for buns will reduce overhead. If you want to just dabble in meat rabbits you need to know it will cost you more $ than just buying meat. If you are looking for the "experience" it could be worth it. But just know what you are getting into.

In normal times, unless someone has previous livestock experience, I would suggest dabbling for a year. Let them know that while dabbling it will be a net drain. Then decide if you want to go all in or give it up. They may decide that dabbling is what they prefer to do. While dabbling, you can tighten up cost, but they need to know that meat rabbits will not be a significant plus as long as they continue to dabble.

This is very helpful. I've been "dabbling," and it is becoming clear that rabbit meat is really expensive to produce! I haven't calculated the actual cost, but I'm guessing it's going to be something on the order of eight to ten dollars per pound, not counting the startup and equipment costs. I was expecting something much lower.

By contrast, I got a batch of Cornish Cross day-old chicks this spring. After calculating everything spent for chicks, shipping, all food, supplements, and litter, my net cost for 100% organic, free-range chicken was exactly one dollar per pound. That's the dressed out weight, not boneless, but that kind of chicken runs six to seven dollars per pound around here.

Still, it's been a shock to realize how expensive it can be to raise meat rabbits. I want to keep dabbling for at least another year or two, but try to become more efficient at it, and see if I can make it more cost effective. I'm sure I can make a bunch of improvements.

One thing I suspect I'm doing wrong is that I've been just keeping the feeders full, instead of giving them a measured amount of feed every day. I've got some who don't eat much, and others who seem to empty their feeders as fast as I can fill them.

Another is that I've been feeding them entirely on rabbit chow, except for scrap treats, instead of tractoring them to (hopefully) cut down on the store-bought food.

Still another is that I'm not harvesting the culls as soon as they get to the best weight. In the meantime, they are eating a lot and not getting much bigger.

Lots more to learn, I know. But thanks for the post!
 

Zass

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My biggest fear with people impulse buying rabbits is the tendency for irresponsible people to dump them instead of butchering them. We already have way too much of an invasive rabbit problem in the US right now, and it's a massive contributor to disease in both domestic and US native rabbits.

My buns cans produce meat fairly inexpensively, but, I can feed bucks, juniors, and dry does primarily on forage, lawn and garden scraps.
As much as I'd like to think anyone could do it, plant ID and balanced feeding takes time (often years) to learn how to do well.
It can be too much for some when you add-in the learning curve of raising rabbits.

Also, it's been more than a few years, and we've probably still not come close making back what I spent on cages :lol:

Honestly, keeping the feeders full of high calorie pellets can cost you more than just the price of wasting feed. Brood stock can easily become obese and slow down or stop breeding.
 

hotzcatz

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I'd guess a lot of it has to do with why the folks are buying rabbits. A lot of the folks who have contacted me to buy rabbits have just wanted a house pet now that they're home more.

Covid has, if anything, increased the demand for rabbits around here. I've been breeding much more than usual (sixty so far this year, which is a huge number for a non-meat breed) and have a waiting list for rabbits. Well, at least, a waiting list for certain rabbits. At the moment, they all want white females with really fuzzy ears. Last time folks were looking for specific rabbits, it was anything but white rabbits. There's no telling what folks are gonna want, at least, as far as specific breeds, colors and genders of rabbits go.
 

DoozyWombat

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If anyone is interested in New Zealand White stock, I'm selling or butchering all my stock. Northern Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. I'd rather sell them as breeding stock than end up slaughtering for food, but they are going, and soon. Reply if interested.

I'd keep them if I had the time to forage for food, but I don't. Working very long hours, they get nothing but pellets. <br /><br /> __________ Mon Feb 15, 2021 8:13 am __________ <br /><br /> I had four of my grow-outs tear apart the chicken wire of their cage and get loose. No idea if they interacted with the local cottontails, but I used a cage trap and caught them all over the next week. Those cage traps are really useful!

I processed three of the four as soon as I caught them, btw.
 

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