Hello im new here and I need some good advice please

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euphoria

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Hello I have male and female who gave me two litters by now with 4 REW babies . Why is it happening and does someone of them is carrying albino gene? Males eyes have some red but just when he is on direct sunlight.
I dont planing to continue to breed female so my question is- what kind of color of female is the best to get to not to end up with REW babies . Thank you so much. Screenshot_20220905-143712_Kijiji.jpg 20220315_175016.jpg
 
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TroubleMakerAcres

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REW is caused by a double recessive ‘cc’ on the C locus. Since each parent only gives one copy of each gene, that means both your buck and doe carry the ‘c’ to create REW. To ensure no REW, you’d have to find breeding stock that the breeder knows for sure does not carry the ‘c’.
 

euphoria

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is the pointed your male?

If so, he'll be your most like progenator of REW.
He is my male . I'm in the search of a new female but I'm not sure what kind of color I should get because I don't want more REW babies
 

euphoria

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REW is caused by a double recessive ‘cc’ on the C locus. Since each parent only gives one copy of each gene, that means both your buck and doe carry the ‘c’ to create REW. To ensure no REW, you’d have to find breeding stock that the breeder knows for sure does not carry the ‘c’.
Thank you !!! I was suspecting maybe it's both of them because he had 2 litters with black angora and no REW babies. What do you think what kind of color babies would be with this female ? Thank you
 

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eco2pia

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Thank you !!! I was suspecting maybe it's both of them because he had 2 litters with black angora and no REW babies. What do you think what kind of color babies would be with this female ? Thank you
The thing with REW is that it's sneaky. There is no guarantee your new female will not also be a carrier, and any of his babies may be carriers. Even a pedigree won't be able to prove that the REW gene isn't hiding in a rabbit. There are only 2 ways to know for sure:

1. Have the rabbit genetically tested.
2. Breed the candidate to a rabbit who is REW. if you never get a REW kit the colored rabbit doesn't likely carry the REW gene, but all the offspring of the test cross would.

I do not recommend either option for you. A cursory glance tells me we do not have readily available generic tests for rabbits regarding cost color genes.

Test breeding is time honored but you end up with lots of undesirable offspring. If you aren't kill-culling the offspring, you need to find homes for those rabbits and you would need to disclose to the new owners your knowledge off the offsprings' genetics, if you are being ethical.
 

judymac

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You've asked an interesting question, but the answer is not found in what you can see about the rabbit, but in what is hiding in its pedigree.
REW is caused by a double recessive ‘cc’ on the C locus. Since each parent only gives one copy of each gene, that means both your buck and doe carry the ‘c’ to create REW. To ensure no REW, you’d have to find breeding stock that the breeder knows for sure does not carry the ‘c’.
There are five possible color options on the C Color gene, listed in descending order of dominance. Capital letters are used for dominant genes, lower case for recessive ones. Normal full-color like chestnut agouti or self blue is coded C and it is dominant over all of the other options, chinchilla c(chd) for chinchilla dark, sable/pearl c(chl) for chinchilla light, pointed white c(h) for HImalayan pattern, and albino REW cc;, and albino REW is the most recessive of all. That means ANY rabbit of ANY other color (excepting something like a seal that requires two sable genes) could be harboring albino without you knowing it, as it only takes one dominant color gene for a rabbit to look that color. That's why you'll need to look at the pedigree or ask the breeder whether they've bred to REW.

Think of albino as a white sheet over a colored rabbit. It carries all the same color genes, could be an agouti or a tortoiseshell, a harlequin, chinchilla, sable or harlequin. BUT, when a rabbit has two of the recessive albino genes, one from each parent, the rabbit's pigment producing system is shut off, and it can't produce the colors it has the genetics for.

Obviously, both of your rabbits carry the recessive albino REW c gene along with their full color C. Any given breeding has a 1 in 4 chance of producing red-eyed whites, a 1 in 4 chance of full-color CC kits that do not carry albino, and a 1 in 2 chance of colored kits that carry the albino recessive in the background. Of course, Lady Luck has her say in every litter, they could all be REW, or all non-carriers, or any combination thereof, as odds are one thing, but actual outcomes can be very different, ask any gambler.
 

euphoria

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The thing with REW is that it's sneaky. There is no guarantee your new female will not also be a carrier, and any of his babies may be carriers. Even a pedigree won't be able to prove that the REW gene isn't hiding in a rabbit. There are only 2 ways to know for sure:

1. Have the rabbit genetically tested.
2. Breed the candidate to a rabbit who is REW. if you never get a REW kit the colored rabbit doesn't likely carry the REW gene, but all the offspring of the test cross would.

I do not recommend either option for you. A cursory glance tells me we do not have readily available generic tests for rabbits regarding cost color genes.

Test breeding is time honored but you end up with lots of undesirable offspring. If you aren't kill-culling the offspring, you need to find homes for those rabbits and you would need to disclose to the new owners your knowledge off the offsprings' genetics, if you are being ethical.
Thank you for your time ❤
 

euphoria

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You've asked an interesting question, but the answer is not found in what you can see about the rabbit, but in what is hiding in its pedigree.

There are five possible color options on the C Color gene, listed in descending order of dominance. Capital letters are used for dominant genes, lower case for recessive ones. Normal full-color like chestnut agouti or self blue is coded C and it is dominant over all of the other options, chinchilla c(chd) for chinchilla dark, sable/pearl c(chl) for chinchilla light, pointed white c(h) for HImalayan pattern, and albino REW cc;, and albino REW is the most recessive of all. That means ANY rabbit of ANY other color (excepting something like a seal that requires two sable genes) could be harboring albino without you knowing it, as it only takes one dominant color gene for a rabbit to look that color. That's why you'll need to look at the pedigree or ask the breeder whether they've bred to REW.

Think of albino as a white sheet over a colored rabbit. It carries all the same color genes, could be an agouti or a tortoiseshell, a harlequin, chinchilla, sable or harlequin. BUT, when a rabbit has two of the recessive albino genes, one from each parent, the rabbit's pigment producing system is shut off, and it can't produce the colors it has the genetics for.

Obviously, both of your rabbits carry the recessive albino REW c gene along with their full color C. Any given breeding has a 1 in 4 chance of producing red-eyed whites, a 1 in 4 chance of full-color CC kits that do not carry albino, and a 1 in 2 chance of colored kits that carry the albino recessive in the background. Of course, Lady Luck has her say in every litter, they could all be REW, or all non-carriers, or any combination thereof, as odds are one thing, but actual outcomes can be very different, ask any gambler.
Wow thank you I definitely now understand more about rabbits genes. Thank you for your time to explain to me
 

judymac

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Some people love the pink/red eyes, others find them 'spooky'. A matter of personal taste. Commercially, they usually prefer REW rabbits, as stray white hairs don't show as much on the meat, and the hides can be dyed any color the processor wants, so the hides all match for a given project.
 

RabbitsOfTheCreek

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One more question. Why do you think it's so hard to sell them ? Because of their red eyes?
I'd say black rabbits are more hard to sell, but I wouldn't think so. Selling Himi colored rabbits isn't hard. But, usually the rabbits who get dumped are REWs, but those are pets and not everyone sells rabbits just for pets
 
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