Broomstick method of killing a rabbit

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LASGSD

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Also works with chickens and ducks but be sure not to pull too hard or you will pull the birds head right off.

I use an old broomstick, some people use a length of pipe. You want something sturdy but not too heavy.

Step 1 - set the rabbit on the ground, hold them by the middle and lay the stick across the back of their neck:

kill-01.jpg



Step 2 - place one foot LIGHTLY across the stick (use just enough pressure to hold it in position) and slide your hands down the bun and grab hold of their back legs:

kill-02.jpg



Step 3 - this last step is a little tricky since you will be doing a couple things at the SAME TIME (in order to avoid any undo suffering for the bun). Bring your other foot up to the stick and then press DOWN with both feet at the same time as you pull UP on the rabbits legs:

kill-03.jpg


You will be able to feel the rabbits necks break. Once that happens you can quickly removed the head to allow them to bleed out (I don't bleed out the buns that are being used for dog food).

One thing you can do is attach a piece of twine with a loop in it to one of the buns back legs BEFORE you kill it. That way you can break the neck, remove the head and hang the bun to bleed out very quickly.<br /><br />__________ Thu Sep 02, 2010 2:51 pm __________<br /><br />Wanted to add ...

When you break the neck the rabbit is essentially dead. They stop breathing and they feel NOTHING. Their body will flop around and twitch for a bit. There is built up energy in the body that needs to be expelled.
 

Leanne

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Thank you again! I have been a little confused with reading about the technique but now I see.
 

eco2pia

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Amazing how clear the pictures make that--thank you so much, I have always thumped 'em, but that does look easy. I could never quite get my head around that last step, but now that I can, I may use it.

Do you have to worry about where their front feet are? In the last pic front paws appear to be out from under, but in the first pic front paws are under the broomstick.
 

Marian

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It's that last step that worries me. My pellet gun has given up the ghost and I'm looking for a .22. But I think I'll start practicing with a stuffie to see if I can perfect that last step. I think broomsticking would be great for the chickens, too. Thanks for posting.
 

LASGSD

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Marian":3nbrt2md said:
It's that last step that worries me. My pellet gun has given up the ghost and I'm looking for a .22. But I think I'll start practicing with a stuffie to see if I can perfect that last step. I think broomsticking would be great for the chickens, too. Thanks for posting.

The last step does take a bit of coordination but it's not that hard to perfect. :) Practicing with a toy would be a great way to start!

Watch out with the chickens. The first time I used the stick for the chickens the whole head came right off!! I was used to the force you need to dislocate the rabbits neck - MUCH more than you need for a chicken. :)
 

Miss M

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Thank you, LASGSD! Very good, clear explanation and pics. We use a pellet gun currently, but you never know.
 

DevonW

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Here is a video using the broomstick method, done by a Lady on another forum I'm on

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBYv3I9cCgo[/youtube]
 

ohiogoatgirl

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ooooookay. i get it. was a little unsure about how i was imagining it if it was right. i was pretty close. thanks for the super-informative pics. very helpful! :D
 

MamaSheepdog

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That looks easy! We shoot 'em, but if you wanted to feed the heads to your dogs, this method would be the way to go. Speaking of which, anyone do that? Feed the heads? I am worried about the dogs becoming obsessed with the live buns if I do it- and it seems rather gruesome, so I have yet to try it.
 

JueLee

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MamaSheepdog":9oocpu56 said:
That looks easy! We shoot 'em, but if you wanted to feed the heads to your dogs, this method would be the way to go. Speaking of which, anyone do that? Feed the heads? I am worried about the dogs becoming obsessed with the live buns if I do it- and it seems rather gruesome, so I have yet to try it.

I feed the heads to my two dogs. I broomstick my bunnies at about 1 pound 12 ounces and freeze them whole. For feeding time, I thaw one out and cut it in half to make two perfect sized meals. I alternate who gets the head end. It doesn't seem gruesome to me, but I was never the sensitive type.

I haven't had trouble with my dogs trying to get at the live rabbits, but the rabbit area is well out of reach of their yard, so the temptation is minimal. I also train them to be gentle with anything I handle, so when they do occasionally get the chance to see a live rabbit up close, they are polite because I'm there to make sure of it.

I don't think my dogs associate the live animal with what I feed them, head attached or not. When it's alive, telling head from tail makes a difference to their behavior and the information they can get from sniffing or licking each end. But once it's dead, it's all equally food.
 

OneAcreFarm

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fldman":gnzv586b said:
That seems so simple! I was contemplating buying the rsbbit wringer but...

For a lot of folks, this method works really well. I tried the broom stick method but evidently I am not coordinated enough to do it well. :shock: Plus, I did not like the bruising on the shoulders. So, I got a Wringer. Have not used it yet, but I will be sure to post how it works. Normally, we use either a pellet gun or hubby does the "karate chop" to the back of neck. Both work well.
 

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