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Trees for Fodder

Provide a well rounded diet without commercial feed, including discussions of the methods and merits of growing fodder.
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Re: Trees for Fodder

Post Number:#16  Unread postby michaels4gardens » Tue Feb 20, 2018 7:25 am


My rabbits will eat a lot of cottonwood leaves ,either green or yellow ( just after they fall) but i have noticed that they will switch to something else after a few days. Then in about 3 days will go right back and eat loads of them again. I wonder if the switching is because of a toxin, or a nutritional shortage...

__________ Tue Feb 20, 2018 5:23 am __________

I found the graphs / charts interesting here..
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/8151/6 ... f71521.pdf

In an effort to explain livestock preference for tree leaves and to
compare leaf quality of different trees, we determined crude protein,
in vitro dry matter digestibility, and tannic acid equivalents of
tree leaves commonly found in the Flint Hills area.

**Superior forage quality.
Osage orange clearly had highest quality forage in the group.
Based on the analyses, Osage orange accumulated 59 of 60 possible
ranking points. Although cottonwood ranked highly in IVDMD
and TAE analyses, its low crude protein level resulted in a mediocre
final quality ranking. Bur oak received the poorest quality
ranking due to low digestibility and high TAE levels. Interestingly,
the bur oakn ranked significantly higher in forage quality than
meat-mutt rabbits, a few laying hens.

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Re: Trees for Fodder

Post Number:#17  Unread postby alforddm » Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:47 am


Given it's tenacity and the fact that shoots/thorns aren't as hard when re-sprouting from a stump, I think believe Osage Orange maybe a good forage item. I also think it maybe possible to gather the hedge apples and store them for winter feeding. I currently have to fight the horses and cows to them so haven't tried this yet. The one test rabbit I tried wasn't to enthusiastic about the apples, but she reacted the same way when I first started feeding pumpkin and now she goes crazy for it, so I haven't given up on that yet. New Leaves of Osage orange also appear to be high in phosphorous, which could help to balance out the calcium/phosphorus ration of many high protein forages/weeds.

Oh and I almost forgot about this little gem. https://www.noble.org/globalassets/docs ... -04-02.pdf I found it when researching ragweed as a forage but I just looked back through it and it has a Osage orange as well and other trees and weeds.
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michaels4gardens

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Re: Trees for Fodder

Post Number:#18  Unread postby michaels4gardens » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:00 am


I missed this earlier- great info here also a-study-on-feeding-mulberry-leaves-to-rabbits-t1447.html
The first link on Maggie's post is dead, but here is a copy of the pdf from a different source - [read the conclusion at the bottom if nothing else]
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/do ... 1&type=pdf

__________ Wed Feb 21, 2018 7:14 am __________

https://riunet.upv.es/bitstream/handle/ ... 1-1-SM.pdf

study shows mulberry can be fed as only feed to maintain adult rabbits --
[JMHO --mono feed programs are not being "suggested" , but it will work for maintenance of mature rabbits ]
meat-mutt rabbits, a few laying hens.

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