Register

Tips for Handraising Kits

Addressing the special needs of the breeding doe and her kits. Includes nutrition, gestation, nest boxes and materials, and tips to ensure survival of the young.
3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
Posts: 166
Joined: April 21, 2014
Location: New Zealand
New Zealand
Thanks: 38
Thanked: 29 in 27 posts
BunnyBucks: 1,127.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#16  Unread postby karenl » Tue Apr 22, 2014 4:57 pm


you canbuy long life goats milk in 1l cardboard boxes full cream we use it for our children good alternative if you cant get the fresh stuff and it lasts longer.

-- Wed Apr 23, 2014 9:57 am --

you canbuy long life goats milk in 1l cardboard boxes full cream we use it for our children good alternative if you cant get the fresh stuff and it lasts longer.

Site Supporter
3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 6023
Joined: October 6, 2013
Location: northwest PA
United States of America
Thanks: 1518
Thanked: 1493 in 1242 posts
BunnyBucks: 30,993.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#17  Unread postby Zass » Tue Apr 22, 2014 6:32 pm


1/2 Cup evaporated goat's milk
1 egg yolk (kinda hard to cut in half, so...)
1/2 Tablespoon corn syrup

I recently tried out this formula recipe (copied from Miss M) to supplement a large litter where the runts (born 1/2 sized) weren't getting quite enough. They were furred out but eyes not open yet when I started. Probably 6 or 7 days old. I decided to feed the two largest kits along with two the smallest, because I wanted to know if if the largest kits would continue to thrive.

Everyone did well, and the ingredients have the advantage of being available at stores that are open 24-7 (Walmart for example)

I lost one kit out of 11 before I decided to supplement, and the smallest remaining kit was almost skeletal when I started. It hadn't fed well in several days.
I used a medicine dropper and fed enough to swell their bellies (not quite as full as their mother would have) only once in the morning and once in the evening. I held the kits in an upright posture. (Sorta like a human sitting position.)
They happily took it from the dropper, but would not lap it from a dish.

After three days on nothing but the formula, the smallest kit was finally strong enough to compete with it's 9 remaining siblings and get a full belly from Mom. The largest kits also continued to thrive and grow faster than the rest of the kits. In other words, the formula didn't seem to harm or inhibit their growth in any way.

I continued to give them formula for about 10 days, after which I found they had full enough bellies without my help. I did continue to offer them all a meal of moistened oats once/day separately from their mother.

At 5 weeks I have 10 thriving kits that have transitioned well onto pellets and hay. 25732579
I did not lose a single kit after I began feeding the formula.
The doe is still nursing a bit, but I have no fear of weaning issues.
The runt is still a little smaller than the rest, but the difference seems to be shrinking daily.
The biggest kits are still growing faster than the rest. They are all a bit smallish for meat-type kits (typical from this smallish doe), but not thin.

I didn't potty any kits, or do anything to keep them warm because there were 10 of them in an excellent nest built by their mother. I did keep them all inside the house (doe included), but I doubt that was necessary. I moved them all outside when the kits reached 4 weeks old.

I suppose the only tip I can add is that it's always best to get as much help from a doe as you can.

The following user would like to thank Zass for this post
Rainey

Moderator
7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 14493
Joined: January 20, 2010
United States of America Female
Thanks: 964
Thanked: 1496 in 1224 posts
BunnyBucks: 56,200.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#18  Unread postby Miss M » Tue Apr 22, 2014 7:02 pm


Wow, beautiful kits! :) So glad the formula helped, and you are right -- getting as much help as you can from the doe is huge!
Sithrah Farm - http://sithrahfarm.com/

We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
- James Madison

2 years of membership2 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 34
Joined: May 29, 2014
Location: Southern Ohio
United States of America Female
Thanks: 40
Thanked: 2 in 1 post
BunnyBucks: 256.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#19  Unread postby katievictoria » Sun Jun 01, 2014 1:20 am


I've used this formula recipe for kittens, dogs, a goat, and even a couple of piglets. It works great! But I don't use evaporated milk, just store bought whole cow's milk. The amount of milk and water is half as much water as milk, and one egg yoke for about every pint of mixture. I have also substituted molassus for the corn syrup because the molassus is packed with iron. It still tastes good to baby animals, and still keeps the poop softened up as does the corn syrup. For' different animals you may have to adjust the amount of water. If you note th4ey have hard poop, add water. If the poop is runny, decrease the water.

I buy pet nursers for small animals, and just use a baby bottle for goats or pigs.

Also, I completely raised a goat on human infant formula once. . . . .Similac to be specific. She did great and had no problems at all. I reasoned that if human babies can benefit from goat milk, why not the other way around? It worked really well.

-- Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:36 am --

Sorry about the repeated stuff. That's what I get for trying to copy and paste! :-)
Last edited by Miss M on Sun Jun 01, 2014 1:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Removed duplicate. :)

Moderator
7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 14493
Joined: January 20, 2010
United States of America Female
Thanks: 964
Thanked: 1496 in 1224 posts
BunnyBucks: 56,200.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#20  Unread postby Miss M » Sun Jun 01, 2014 2:13 am


katievictoria wrote: Sorry about the repeated stuff. That's what I get for trying to copy and paste! :-)

I fixed it! :D

katievictoria wrote:I don't use evaporated milk, just store bought whole cow's milk.

That sounds like a great, versatile formula!

Some baby rabbits can process cow's milk well enough to make it, but it isn't usually well tolerated by them. That's why we discourage its use for rabbits. :)

I experimented with using straight evaporated goat's milk in the formula, because I had read other places where people had diluted it, and many of them did not have good results.

I figured... baby rabbits take in so little milk from their mothers, and yet they grow so quickly. I remembered reading that rabbit milk was very, very rich, which would explain this. I thought maybe the added water was the problem. So I left the evaporated goat's milk as it was, which was double strength straight from the can.

The original recipe I saw was 1/2 cup evaporated goat's milk, 1/2 cup water, 1 egg yolk, and 1 Tablespoon corn syrup.

I cut the water completely out. Since I had done that, I cut the corn syrup in half. It's hard to cut an egg yolk in half, so I put the whole thing in there. That's how I came up with the formula recipe I use. :)

katievictoria wrote:Also, I completely raised a goat on human infant formula once. . . . .Similac to be specific. She did great and had no problems at all. I reasoned that if human babies can benefit from goat milk, why not the other way around? It worked really well.

That's great that it worked out well... I don't know if I'd have thought to try it. :P
Sithrah Farm - http://sithrahfarm.com/

We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
- James Madison

3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
Posts: 33
Joined: July 24, 2013
Location: Leslie Michigan
Thanks: 6
Thanked: 4 in 4 posts
BunnyBucks: 171.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#21  Unread postby Blossomacres » Mon Dec 29, 2014 5:17 pm


I successfully bottle raised a litter of 5 French Angoras. It was my very first litter I ever had and luckily I was only in high school and not college:). My doe was giving off too much milk and developed mastitis. I had to milk her out each day, give her medicine, apply hot packs to her belly, and bottle raise her litter. There were 6 originally but 5 survived, so I think I did well:) I originally fed them with an eye dropper goats milk but they did not like it, so I switched to sheeps milk, which they devoured:) They all fought for the eye dropper, lol! The kits later progressed to a bowl of milk which saved me a lot of time, although in their eagerness to get to the bowl first they did hop into it. Of course, this resulted in wet, rancid smelling babies so I had to give them frequent baths;) The kits were somewhat delayed in growth but they still looked really nice and one of them even became a grand champion.
Specializing in the beautiful French Angora and New Zealand

http://www.blossomacresrabbitry.webs.com/
http://www.blossomacresrabbitry.blogspot.com/

The following user would like to thank Blossomacres for this post
Miss M

Moderator
7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 14493
Joined: January 20, 2010
United States of America Female
Thanks: 964
Thanked: 1496 in 1224 posts
BunnyBucks: 56,200.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#22  Unread postby Miss M » Mon Dec 29, 2014 7:18 pm


:lol: Sour milk babies, huh? :P

Sheep's milk! Very interesting! Thank you for sharing that. :) How old were they when you started feeding them yourself?
Sithrah Farm - http://sithrahfarm.com/

We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
- James Madison

Site Supporter
3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 6023
Joined: October 6, 2013
Location: northwest PA
United States of America
Thanks: 1518
Thanked: 1493 in 1242 posts
BunnyBucks: 30,993.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#23  Unread postby Zass » Mon Dec 29, 2014 8:28 pm


Sheep's milk is much like goats milk...but more rich, right? It would be good for rabbits if it was more widely available.

3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
Posts: 33
Joined: July 24, 2013
Location: Leslie Michigan
Thanks: 6
Thanked: 4 in 4 posts
BunnyBucks: 171.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#24  Unread postby Blossomacres » Mon Dec 29, 2014 10:37 pm


Miss M - I don't remember how old they were but I believe they were roughly a week old, give or take.

Zass - I think sheep milk may be more rich but I think the big thing was that it is sweeter than goats milk and did not have an odor to it like goats milk does if you have a buck on your farm (which we do;)) Luckily one of our ewes had babies so we had that option. I am not sure if they would have survived on goats milk because they just did not like it.
Specializing in the beautiful French Angora and New Zealand

http://www.blossomacresrabbitry.webs.com/
http://www.blossomacresrabbitry.blogspot.com/

Site Supporter
3 years of membership3 years of membership3 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 6023
Joined: October 6, 2013
Location: northwest PA
United States of America
Thanks: 1518
Thanked: 1493 in 1242 posts
BunnyBucks: 30,993.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#25  Unread postby Zass » Mon Dec 29, 2014 10:39 pm


Blossomacres wrote:
Zass - I think sheep milk may be more rich but I think the big thing was that it is sweeter than goats milk and did not have an odor to it like goats milk does if you have a buck on your farm (which we do;)) Luckily one of our ewes had babies so we had that option. I am not sure if they would have survived on goats milk because they just did not like it.


Milk sheep are on my list of "things that would make my life complete."

Moderator
7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 14493
Joined: January 20, 2010
United States of America Female
Thanks: 964
Thanked: 1496 in 1224 posts
BunnyBucks: 56,200.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#26  Unread postby Miss M » Tue Dec 30, 2014 1:35 am


Zass wrote:
Blossomacres wrote:
Zass - I think sheep milk may be more rich but I think the big thing was that it is sweeter than goats milk and did not have an odor to it like goats milk does if you have a buck on your farm (which we do;)) Luckily one of our ewes had babies so we had that option. I am not sure if they would have survived on goats milk because they just did not like it.


Milk sheep are on my list of "things that would make my life complete."

I have been torn between goats and sheep. My beloved Shay leans toward goats because they don't need shearing, and I lean toward sheep because I've read that the milk is less affected by things like feed and having a male around... and I don't want to have to put hot wire everywhere. LOL
Sithrah Farm - http://sithrahfarm.com/

We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
- James Madison

1 year of membership
Posts: 2
Joined: May 8, 2015
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 in 0 post
BunnyBucks: 20.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#27  Unread postby Dandelion » Fri May 08, 2015 1:46 pm


My mini lop neglected her kits and didn't feed them so my vet said that by holding the doe upside down and letting the babies suckle whilst holding them on her might be a good idea, and if it didn't work he gave us some formula milk and syringes. We have been using this technique so far and it seems to work really well, what is surprising is that the mother doesn't even get too stressed! The 5 babies, (there used to be 8 but as she didn't feed them there were some casualties :( ) are all looking plump and healthy at 6 days old! Also a good was to keep them warm is purchasing a "snuggle safe" heat pad. These stay warm for aaaages and also are REALLY effective!! I just thought I would share this idea as a pose to formula feeding as I think the likelihood of your kits surviving is much better! :) Thanks bye!!

Moderator
7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 14493
Joined: January 20, 2010
United States of America Female
Thanks: 964
Thanked: 1496 in 1224 posts
BunnyBucks: 56,200.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#28  Unread postby Miss M » Fri May 08, 2015 1:51 pm


Dandelion wrote:My mini lop neglected her kits and didn't feed them so my vet said that by holding the doe upside down and letting the babies suckle whilst holding them on her might be a good idea, and if it didn't work he gave us some formula milk and syringes. We have been using this technique so far and it seems to work really well, what is surprising is that the mother doesn't even get too stressed! The 5 babies, (there used to be 8 but as she didn't feed them there were some casualties :( ) are all looking plump and healthy at 6 days old! Also a good was to keep them warm is purchasing a "snuggle safe" heat pad. These stay warm for aaaages and also are REALLY effective!! I just thought I would share this idea as a pose to formula feeding as I think the likelihood of your kits surviving is much better! :) Thanks bye!!

This is a technique some of us have had luck with. :) Others (like me) have ended up with flying kits and a doe kicking so hard she could break her back. So it works with some does.
Sithrah Farm - http://sithrahfarm.com/

We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
- James Madison

7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership7 years of membership
User avatar
Posts: 7285
Joined: December 26, 2009
Location: near London, Ontario
Canada Female
Thanks: 42
Thanked: 714 in 623 posts
BunnyBucks: 32,981.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#29  Unread postby ladysown » Fri May 08, 2015 6:31 pm


so.. why not get hair sheep then? you don't need to shear them. :)
ladysown

http://athomepets.weebly.com/
Primary Blog : http://athomepets.weebly.com/at-home-pets-blog.html
Old Blog: blogs/athomepets/

1 year of membership
Posts: 7
Joined: September 14, 2015
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 in 0 post
BunnyBucks: 45.00

Re: Tips for Handraising Kits

Post Number:#30  Unread postby KaceyP79 » Mon Oct 19, 2015 3:50 pm


I have a little one that is falling a little behind and I was going to start supplementing between feedings. But I can't find the evaporated goats milk in my area, what else can I use? The only thing I could find is puppy formula at Walmart, and they had goats milk in the refrigerator section along with reg. cows milk.

PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests