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This is beyond strange

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This is beyond strange

Post Number:#1  Unread postby LopLover » Tue Dec 02, 2014 3:19 pm


I have a mini lop buck that went from sweet to agressive as he entered the lovely "teenage bunny faze". Everytime I would walk past his cage he would flag me and would try to bit me when I reached in to pet him. On occasion his teeth would latch onto my arm and at that point I was thankful I owned a carheart coat. Anyhow, my mother suggested that he wanted attention and I thought that she was pulling my leg. However, she took him out of his cage and set him in our binny run and his demenor instantly changed. He would not leave either of us alone and wanted nothing more than to jump onto our laps and be pet. What is with this drastic mood change?
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Re: This is beyond strange

Post Number:#2  Unread postby Zass » Tue Dec 02, 2014 4:07 pm


It sounds to me like he might be territorial? To be honest, I have little experience with aggression in bucks.

Perhaps his flagging and latching on were attempts to mate instead of aggression?
Were you holding a doe beforehand? Male rabbits can get pretty affectionate when their owners smell like doe. :D Similarly, the smell of another male rabbit might trigger aggression.

You might try permanently changing his cage situation around. Moving him to a different cage, different style of cage, or changing the elevation that his current cage is at. I've seen some pretty drastic mood changes when rabbits have been moved both higher and lower. If he's caged near another male, moving him away might help.

I prefer pens with large doors that I can reach into from above.

Rabbits often absolutely HATE being pulled through small doors on the sides of a cage.
Last edited by Zass on Tue Dec 02, 2014 4:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: This is beyond strange

Post Number:#3  Unread postby akane » Tue Dec 02, 2014 4:14 pm


He could just be cage aggressive. Some rabbits violently defend their living space but take them out and they are perfectly friendly. Swapping cages might help but possibly only for a short time before he marks his new territory.
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Failing might just mean you are trying to climb instead of swim https://youtu.be/evathYHc1Fg

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Re: This is beyond strange

Post Number:#4  Unread postby LopLover » Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:46 pm


I thought of perhaps moving him to a higher elevation. At this current point in time he is as waist level so he and I don't really make eye contact except for when I crouch down to attempt to pet the little bugger. I've been putting him outside to run around everyday and that seems to help a little with his aggressiveness but he still nips at my shirt when I get him out. Hopefully him and I can resolve our issues. I don't hate the guy and want to get along with him just like the rest of my rabbits but I certainly cannot have an aggressive buck in the barn, especially as a prospect herd buck. Like I said though, I just found the drastic mood change odd. It isn't so much the aggression that caught me off guard but the sudden switch to him being friendly. I had a slight moment of "Who are you and where is my ornery little boy?" I agree that it could also be a scent thing as well since there are several rabbits that get their daily head scratches before him.
Currently raising Mini Lops and Californians. Also raising a few Netherlands Dwarfs and New Zealand Whites.

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