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Recipes!

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#16  Unread postby Anntann » Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:08 pm


Oh god...if Mike sees the BBQ recipe from Devon, we'll be doing that, ASAP. me..I'm going to try the simple crockpot with bacon wrapped, bit of apple juice. Or maybe my old standby: smother it with onions, add some wine to the pot and let it simmer for hours. :D

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#17  Unread postby DevonW » Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:23 pm


I've got another tasty recipe...

Sweet and sour rabbit.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

* 1 lb. Rabbit boneless
* 1 tbsp. vegetable oil
* 1 medium green pepper, cut into 1" pieces
* 1 medium onion, cut into thin wedges
* 1 (15 1/4-oz). can pineapple chunks in juice
* 1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
* 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
* 2 tbsps. cornstarch
* 2 tbsps. soy sauce

Directions:

1. Partially freeze rabbit. Cut across the grain into 2 1/2 × 2 1/4-inch strips; set aside.
2. Preheat a wok or large skillet over high heat; add oil.
3. Stir-fry green pepper and onion in hot oil for 2-3 minutes or till crisp-tender.
4. Remove from wok. Add more oil, if necessary. Add half the rabbit to wok; stir-fry until browned. Remove rabbit; stir-fry the remaining rabbit. Return all rabbit to wok; keep warm.
5. Drain pineapple, reserving juice. In a small saucepan combine the juice, brown sugar, vinegar, cornstarch and soy sauce. Bring to a boil; cook about 1 minute or till thickened, stirring constantly.
6. Return green pepper and onion to wok. Stir in pineapple and the thickened pineapple juice mixture.
7. Cook and stir until heated through. Serve with rice, if desired.
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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#18  Unread postby Katduck » Thu Jan 21, 2010 8:02 pm


Marian wrote:I am going to have try both those recipes,Briza, thank you for sharing. Man, I love easy!

This recipe is what I refer to as "How to get people who hate rabbit to love it". It comes from The Austrailian Women's Weekly and it uses chicken. I usually use cooked rabbit leftovers.

Lemon Cream Rabbit With Pasta

500g bow tie pasta (I use less and any short pasta will do)
1 tbsp olive oil
400g (about 1 lb, I use more)roughly chopped boneless rabbit
1 tbsp corn flour
1 tsp chicken stock (or 1 cube or 1 packet)
3/4 cup water (I usually omit chicken stock, water and use homemade rabbit or chicken stock)
1/2 cup cream
1/4 tsp grated lemon rind (I use more)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 tsp sugar
1 tbsp teriyaki sauce
1 clove garlic crushed (I use 2)
1 tbsp chopped fresh sage
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley (I omit this)

Cook pasta. Fry rabbit in wok with oil in batches and remove. (if using cooked rabbit, skip this part). Blend the remaining ingredients, minus the parsley, pour in the wok, stir until it boils and thickens. Add the stir-fried (or previously cooked rabbit), pasta and parsley, stir till hot. Serves 4 - 6.

It's really not as complicated as it sounds, I can usually whip it up while the pasta is cooking.

Marian


This sounds good. Can I assume that "Corn Flour" is corn starch and not corn meal for us in the USA?

Kat

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#19  Unread postby MaggieJ » Thu Jan 21, 2010 8:15 pm


Don't know about elsewhere, but here in Ontario corn flour is not the same as corn starch. Corn starch is further refined and is used mainly for thickening. Corn flour is like corn meal, but ground to a fine powder. You could put corn meal in a blender to make a bit for the recipe rather than buying it separately. I would think corn starch would work too, since it is such a small quantity and seems to be used as a thickener.

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#20  Unread postby Katduck » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:32 pm


MaggieJ wrote:you may want to pull the pieces out partway through, remove the meat and then return the bones to the stock pot. That way the meat won't lose all its flavour and can be added back to the soup in the final stages.


What a great idea! I'm having one of those "why didn't I think of that?" moments :slap:

I like to simmer my stock real low for a real long time (overnight in the crockpot) but then the meat is not usable and/or unappealing.

Last night we had Rabbit Soup. I cut up garlic, onion, carrots & celery and sauted in a little oil until slightly tender. Then added stock that I had strained thru cheesecloth. Once it came to a boil, I added 8oz Ditalini pasta and cooked until almost done and then added 3 leftover cooked rabbit burgers, chopped up. It was pretty good. The pasta swelled and took up more liquid as it cooled, but I had more stock to add to save the leftovers.

I just pulled a whole rabbit that I cooked in a roasting bag with 1/2 cup apple juice at 325 degrees for 90min. It was still sort of frozen when I put it in. I'm waiting for it to cool so I can strip the meat and make stir fry. I let ya'll know how it comes out.

Kat

__________ Thu Jan 21, 2010 6:32 pm __________

MaggieJ wrote:Don't know about elsewhere, but here in Ontario corn flour is not the same as corn starch. Corn starch is further refined and is used mainly for thickening. Corn flour is like corn meal, but ground to a fine powder. You could put corn meal in a blender to make a bit for the recipe rather than buying it separately. I would think corn starch would work too, since it is such a small quantity and seems to be used as a thickener.


Will do, Thanks. I might just use Wondra flour. Seems like that would be a good sub, just wouldn't have the corn flavor.

Kat

__________ Fri Jan 22, 2010 3:32 pm __________

The stir fry was a hit. I use 2 pkgs of Yakisoba noodles with sauce mix included that I get at my local Winco. I cut up carrots, celery, green onions and cabbage into slivers and added bite sized rabbit meat at the last minute since it was already cooked.

The rabbit in the bag worked well, although next time I will make sure it is thawed before I put it in and I think I cut to big a hole in the top. But the meat came out well and was pretty easy to strip off. Will try again for sure.

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#21  Unread postby Marian » Fri Jan 22, 2010 7:30 pm


Katduck wrote:This sounds good. Can I assume that "Corn Flour" is corn starch and not corn meal for us in the USA?
Kat


Corn starch and corn flour are different. Corn flour is like any flour, just made out of corn. It doesn't really thicken the sauce in this dish, it adds texture and provides colour and melds the teriyaki and lemon to the cream. If you don't have corn flour, regular white flour is a good substitute. I wouldn't use corn starch in this dish but if you do, cut the amount by at least half or your sauce will just be goop, the liquid in this dish is only about 1 1/4 cups.

I hope you enjoy it :).

Marian

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#22  Unread postby Truckinguy » Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:07 pm


Any suggestions on how to cook up the organs... heart, kidneys, liver?

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#23  Unread postby MaggieJ » Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:59 pm


Truckinguy wrote:Any suggestions on how to cook up the organs... heart, kidneys, liver?


I like them sauteed with mushrooms in butter - real butter! - with a nice fresh-from-the-garden tomato on the side. This time of year tomatoes aren't worth buying, so maybe just a green salad. You want something fresh-flavoured to off-set the richness.

The liver should also make an excellent pate. I tried making some once and it was very good. I think I worked from this blurb... sorry, I don't have the source.

"Rabbit liver is unusually large and unusually delicious. Sear it on both sides in clarified butter, leaving it pink inside. Then add a few shallots to the pan with some wine, port or brandy and cook a few minutes. Process with a touch of cream, salt, pepper and a pinch of allspice or nutmeg for quick pate."

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#24  Unread postby ladysown » Tue May 25, 2010 8:25 am


here's a site with lots of rabbit recipes.

http://www.huntingpa.com/Rabbit%20recipes.html

__________ Tue May 25, 2010 8:23 am __________

Here's Something I tried this morning - this was just a throw it together to see how it works type of thing. I tend to prefer bland so don't cook with a lot of salt or pepper.

one liver, two hearts, four kidneys.
Sliced as thin as I could.

Put in pan sprayed with cooking spray.
Let cook a while (not long)
Add one small onion sliced in half rings.
Add some seasonings of choice (I used a no salt blend from costco)
Add one can of mushrooms with half the juice.

When it's almost done, add two eggs and mix well.
I also threw in a wee bit of rabbit stock that I had as it was looking a bit dry (like half a wooden spoon).

Stir it a LOT. Took me about 10-13 minutes to make.
Serve and eat. Tasted good to me. :)

I'm not a big liver person, but I could eat liver made like this again.

__________ Tue May 25, 2010 8:25 am __________

Also made this the other day

Rabbit Cobbler
Serves 4-6 as a main dish
Adapted from the original recipe from the New York Times
3 tbsp olive oil
1 leek, well washed and chopped
Salt and black pepper
2 c quartered button mushrooms
1 ½ c or more chicken stock or, if you have the foresight, rabbit stock
1 sprig fresh, chopped rosemary, plus more to mix into the cobbler batter
2 medium carrots, cut into coins
1 butchered rabbit
1 c peas, frozen or fresh
2 tbsp assorted fresh herbs (e.g., chives, lemon thyme, etc.)
1 c corn, frozen or fresh
2 tbsp cornstarch
2 c flour
1 ½ tsp baking powder
¼ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
4 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into bits
1 cup buttermilk
2 eggs

1. Heat oven to 375°F. Put oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When oil is hot, add the leek, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook until liquid has released and evaporated, about 5 minutes.
2. Add stock and rosemary; bring to a boil, and let bubble for a minute or two, then add carrots and rabbit and reduce heat so the liquid simmers. Cook until carrots are almost tender and rabbit is cooked through — 30 to 40 minutes, depending on the type of rabbit. Pull out the rabbit parts and pull the meat from the bone. Chop up the meat and add it back into the pot. Add peas, herbs, and corn and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are brightly colored and just tender, another minute or so.
3. Whisk cornstarch with a few tablespoons of broth to make a slurry. Add slurry to pot and stir until liquid thickens slightly. Transfer everything to an ovenproof dish and set aside.
4. Put flour in a food processor with rosemary, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add butter and process until mixture resembles small peas, no more than 30 seconds. (You can also do this by hand, using two knives, a fork, your fingers, or a pastry cutter). Transfer mixture to a bowl and mix in buttermilk and eggs until it just comes together; it should be sticky.
5. Drop spoonfuls of batter on top of vegetables and rabbit and smooth with a knife, covering as much surface area as possible but leaving a few gaps for steam to escape. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes until golden on top and bubbly underneath. Scoop into bowls and serve immediately.

Special thanks to Katie Hochstedler for her assistance with this recipe.

NOTE: we found this a bit bland - for fresh herbs I used thyme, basil and garlic chives. So I'd add some additional spices of some sort. Not sure what, it tasted good, but just seemed to be lacking something. I"m thinking some type of spicer spice.
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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#25  Unread postby MaggieJ » Tue May 25, 2010 8:52 am


Freshly ground allspice or cloves adds a touch of zing to meat recipes. I have a dedicated grinder with black pepper, allspice berries and whole cloves in it. About 3 parts pepper, one part allspice, one part cloves, I would say... but I don't measure.

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#26  Unread postby john_francis » Sat Sep 04, 2010 6:55 pm


Our first rabbit was cooked whole in the oven for 45 minutes at 350 degrees with (Mon Dieu, la honte!) simple store bought Kraft BBQ sauce.

The dressed out bunny weighed a smidgen under three pound and I used around a third of a bottle of sauce.

Too easy and it was marvelous.

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#27  Unread postby Anntann » Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:04 pm


John_francis...you just made my Michael's week! If I put BBQ sauce on cardboard, he'd eat it, I swear!

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#28  Unread postby boyd » Sun Nov 07, 2010 6:43 am


Here's one I cooked last night.. And I don't do so well with measuring ingredients but cook by taste!

1 4lb rabbit carcas cleaned
6 quarts of water in large pan
1 large white onion quartered only
1 tablespoon minced garlic

Set to boil for about an hour to hour fifteen minutes

Pull carcass out and let cool enough to pick off the meat and dispose of bones where dogs won't eat them... put meat back in pot

Then I added 2 boxes of Chicken Rice (cheap variety) that usually cooks up like spanish rice. Fried the rice mix in butter, added that and spices right to boiling pot.
2 handfuls of white rice
7 large carrots
2 bell peppers
pinch of basil, seasoning salt, oregano
tablespoon canning salt

and cook till rice and veggies are done... all in all about 2 hours. Makes a very thick stew with rice. Kids had friends over and were giving them evil grins. :twisted: I figured the stinkers didn't tell their friends they were eating rabbit so I let them know. Not only did they not care, they had seconds.

In all, it fed 10 of us with some leftovers.

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#29  Unread postby SaratogaNZW » Wed Jan 12, 2011 4:47 pm


Rabbit Enchilada Soup
Three seemingly random words, when strung together make a very nice authentic tasting soup. Tried this one last night and loved it! Started by deboning 2 scrawny fryers from last fall, yielding about 3 pounds boneless cubed meat. Got the idea from a local soup and salad restaurant that makes an awesome Chicken Enchilada soup.

2 fryer rabbits, deboned and cubed.
2 large cans red mild enchilada sauce
2 cups Masa (corn flour, check the mexican aisle)
4 cups water
3 cups rabbit (chicken) stock
1 medium onion
5-6 teeth fresh garlic, minced
Cayenne and chili power to taste
2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
Sour cream, shredded cheese, and tortilla strips to garnish

Marinate rabbit with spices and 1 can enchilada sauce in fridge overnight.
Whisk masa and 4 cups of water until smooth.
Brown onion and garlic in a large soup pot with a small amount of oil.
Add rabbit mixture, enchilada sauce, stock, cheese, and masa mix.
Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, dont let the cheese stick and burn on the bottom. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until rabbit is tender, I simmered mine more that that, about an hour.
Garnish with shredded cheese, sour cream, and tortilla strips, serve with tortilla chips or tostadas!

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Re: Recipes!

Post Number:#30  Unread postby Tom E » Sun Jun 12, 2011 10:41 pm


Hey gang!
I just wanted to throw my hat in the ring here.

1) I usually just do a fairly simple braise, don't have a recipe though as its more of a technique. You can change it up depending on what's in your fridge.
First get a pot on the stove and warm it up. You'll want something like a dutch oven here (ideal) but a pot will do as well.

Pour in a little olive oil or real butter.
When the oil is good and hot, put in the rabbit pieces floured lightly with salt and pepper. Don't be afraid to get them pretty browned. They may not seem like it at first, but they will 'unstick' from the pan when it's time to flip them.

After browned all sides, put the pieces in a bowl and reserve.

Now fry in the same oil (add a little more if needed) some onions (I like lots! and put them in a bowl when finished), some sliced mushrooms (Lots as well please! in the same bowl as the onions), and then fry some minced fresh garlic.

When the garlic is just getting done, add a tablespoon or so of tomato paste. Stir that around and let it stick good to the pan. You may think that you're burning it, but it's just caramelizing nice.. Just before it's starting to burn, add a pint of good brown ale, and rub the pan with a wooden spoon to deglaze.

Now give it back the rabbit, a cup or so of rabbit stock (or chicken if you don't have it).
Add herbs at this time (sage and some thyme are good).

Cover the pan and put in the oven at 350, till the rabbit is tender.

Plate rabbit parts over your favorite starch (polenta is a treat for this) with the sauteed mushrooms and onions.
Now you put the sauce back on the stove and make it a sauce (a little thinner than gravy for me) with some roux, flour in water, or corn starch in water (I like the corn starch- makes it really silky)..

2) Alternatively, do the same thing, but make pot pies!

Only difference is that you'll need some pie dough set aside in pans (I use the single serving ones) and freeze the uncooked dough in it's pan to start.

Now do everything the same, but when you take out the finally cooked rabbit meat, chop it up finely with a knife and put it in the fridge.

Make the gravy a little thicker than you would for the braised dish. Cool it off as well.

The next day (everything is chilled, pie doughs are frozen), fill the pie dough with rabbit meat, sauteed veggies, add some frozen peas, and top with the gravy. You want the pie filling a little higher in the center than the rim of the pie. Top with another pie crust and cut three slits into it.

Place in a preheated oven till the crust is golden brown!



I'll be trying some of these you guys posted for sure.

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