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Cuy Recipe

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Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#1  Unread postby Ghost » Sat Oct 14, 2017 5:47 pm


Well the only way I've eaten cuy so far is what I called "Steamed Cuy In a flour tortilla".

Simple recipe, put a 1/4 inch of water in a pan maybe a dash of powdered garlic (I don't think I used enough to effect the flavor). put steamer basket in pot. Place whole guinea pig on basket (I used skin-off guinea pig). Simmer on low heat until the meat changes color and is cooked. Pick meat off bone and wrap in warm flour tortillas. Enjoy!!

I'm really debating weather I should try something like cuy and dumplings (one of my fav rabbit recipes), or whether I should do the tortillas again.

Cuy has a much stronger flavor than rabbit. Honestly, I don't know what I would do to have a rabbit and cuy stew.

Ps. I've always favored simple recipes when I was cooking rabbits from our rabbitry
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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#2  Unread postby MaggieJ » Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:09 pm


Thanks for posting this, Ghost. The idea of eating guinea pig is new to many people, but posts like yours help familiarize us with it.
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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#3  Unread postby SarniaTricia » Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:55 pm


Thank you

Although I have yet to adventure into eating Guinea Pigs... I always wondered what show breeders do with their extras...lol
I assume skinny pigs would be favoured for eating, because they already have less hair.. :)
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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#4  Unread postby GBov » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:06 pm


I loved mine split down the middle, rolled in seasoned flour and fried crispy. Mmmmm Yummy!

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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#5  Unread postby Ghost » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:26 pm


Addition to GBov recipe:

The cuy is prepared skin-on.
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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#6  Unread postby Zass » Thu Jan 25, 2018 1:14 am


We raised a few good sized g-pigs, and I tried them in hopes that they would taste something like squirrel. They were a lot of work to skin. The flavor wasn't as good as squirrel is to me, but honestly, I feel we never explored the meat well enough. Not because we disliked it, but because the rabbits, quail, and pigeons won over the precious little animal-housing-space we have. Cuy has a lot of connective tissue, which suggests it would preform well with more involved cooking styles than rabbit needs. Connective tissues gets crispy when fried. It might also be nice to try parboiled(or steamed) and then cooked another way.

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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#7  Unread postby GBov » Thu Jan 25, 2018 10:55 am


Duh, sorry, forgot to say that I scalded my gpigs first (yeh yeh yeh, after dispatching first ;) ) so cooked them skin on.

They were a dream to clean, very very easy indeed and so little wastage leaving the skin on.

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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#8  Unread postby Ghost » Mon Apr 09, 2018 12:35 pm


Ok I cooked cuy a second time. In my current living situation, I don't have much in the way of cookware. So I went back to the tried-n-true steamed cuy. However, I branched out a bit and made some gravy this time. more on that later.

Now that I joined a forum, I decided when eating cuy, I needed to come up with a good description of what cuy tasted like. It's funny the first time I eat it, my mind was racing to compare the flavor to something I had eaten before. This time when eating it, my mind was, "oh yeah, that's cuy.", not informative to the uninitiated. I would describe the cuy meat texture like that of chicken, however it did not taste like chicken. The flavor was much like pork chop with perhaps a hint of rabbit. The texture/flavor combination was most evident when eating the shoulders. Even though I was making shredded meat, I love to break off the shoulder blades and scrape the meat off with my teeth.

I also found the liver quite pleasant to eat. Coming from me, this is QUITE A THING, because I generally HATE liver. I can not stand calf's liver, I find the pungent flavor extremely unbearable. Also when I lived with my mother, she would fry chicken liver and a would run from the stench. So even if you are not a fan of liver, give the GP liver a chance, you might be pleasantly surprised. I even found the kidneys good to eat. I never tried rabbit liver but now I feel I should have.

Using the open-skinning technique (detailed in my other post), I was able to remove the skin and leave a nice fat layer around the animal. Actually I think the GP I butchered might qualify as obese. For people out there that might be interested in raising some animals to get a bit of fat, GPs might be the answer if your living in a location where hogs are impractical due to zoning or space requirements. I would hazard to guess that the individual that I killed had an excessive amount of fat. I don't think I could have eaten her skin-on. My guess is that, she would have tasted like eating a grease ball. I had to remove much excess fat. Unfortunately with my micro-refrigerator, I was not able to save the fat (I would have preferred to store it for later use). What I did like about the fat, was that it was excellent for cooking and it had a feel (both mouth-feel and on my fingers) like that of pork chop fat. I had a hard time making gravy in the past, but I found that cuy fat has outstanding qualities that make it easy for gravy making. I consider REAL gravy to be just fat and flour with meat drippings for flavor. I consider the addition of corn starch to be cheating that corrupts the flavor of gravy. In the past, I admit to cheating in my gravy by adding starch, just because I am unskilled at gravy making. Using the fat from boiled cuy lard, I was totally amazed how well the gravy constancy matched my expectation of REAL gravy. I also added cooked and shredded guinea pig liver to the gravy for extra flavor.

Because of the fat, I would imagine that skin-off cuy seared on a grill pan https://www.house.com.au/images/hires/SAH-19557.jpg would make an excellent meal. I haven't tried cooking cuy in this way. but I think the layer of fat on the carcass would prevent burning and yet provide grill marks promoting the maillard reaction https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction. I would imagine that as the meat was cooking it would have a nice bacon-ey smell (licking my lips).

Another hypothetical recipe that I feel that the cuy fat would work well is "cream of cuy". In the ARBA cookbook https://www.arba.net/store/store.php?ac=viewProduct&id=8&cid=0 there is a recipe called cream of rabbit. I love cream of chicken and chicken pot pie, because it matches my motto, "If you've gotta kill an animal to make food, make the food taste like the animal that died.". To me cream of chicken is the best way to get that chicken taste. So after I killed Bandit the rabbit, I wanted to make "cream of rabbit", so I could really enjoy his flavor. To the best of my recollection (The book is at the back of the my shed so I don't have the exact recipe at my disposal) the recipe calls for a large amount of fat, primarily dairy butter and heavy cream. As I remember, I was able to render Bandit's kidney fat to replace some of the butter. I cooked to the best of my skill. The soup tasted good, but I could never get the consistency right. In canned "cream of ..." soups seam to have a sauce that stays homogenize. The sauce in my cream of rabbit would separate rather than stay homogeneous. From my gravy experience, I think that cuy lard would help maintain consistency.
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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#9  Unread postby michaels4gardens » Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:02 pm


also try baked @ 350 1/2 hr / lb ,uncovered, skin on, back facing up, on a rack so it can drain, poke a thousand holes in the skin with a needle , rub with salt and black pepper-- ---just like a duck -- wonderful...

I forgot to add- tie the legs in against the body [with cotton string] before baking-or they will be over-done ,with this method...
Last edited by michaels4gardens on Wed Apr 18, 2018 5:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#10  Unread postby akane » Mon Apr 16, 2018 6:57 pm


Cuy asado can also be closer to what we consider grilled (usually served with potatos or root vegetables) and actually it may be partially responsible for the huge variation in taste some people report. Cuy frito (fried) and cuy asado are often both cooked on a stick to hold onto so they look quite similar but the street food version is fried while home prepared or restaurant versions will be turned on the heat source by the spit. You can find youtube vids searching cuy asado but they may or may not link to a translatable recipe if your spanish is not up to it. Otherwise google translate will do a good job on most recipes for roasted and grilled cuy.
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Re: Cuy Recipe

Post Number:#11  Unread postby Ghost » Tue Apr 17, 2018 1:38 pm


Copying michaels4gardens's other recipe over here. A slight confusion, he originally posted it to a different thread

michaels4gardens wrote:when I lived in Florida, I tried Guinea pigs for a while- the seasons were long, and grass and forage were almost always available-- I prefer the skin on, [skinning is also a lot of trouble compared to rabbits] I like them deep fried - or rubbed with salt and pepper, and baked- then at the last,- I uncover them and set the oven on broil , until they get brown and crispy - I like to dip meat pieces in butter and fresh chopped garlic..[no wonder i am so fat] .. I don't think raising them is too efficient in areas with long winters, as feed must be purchased -- unless,-- one had a greenhouse like I did in Florida..
You have to do the most good for the most. You most remember that a few will won't make it. Don't be ashamed to shed a tear for the ones lost along the way, we will not hold it against you. Just remember "the herd goes on".

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