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Feeding Grains

Provide a well rounded diet without commercial feed, including discussions of the methods and merits of growing fodder.
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Feeding Grains

Post Number:#1  Unread postby Hatties Hoppers » Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:49 pm


Hello, i was wondering if any of u all feed your rabbits grain and what mix do u use? I am currently feeding a grain mix but I would like to make some changes to it. I have soy bean meal in it which falls through the feeders and a lot of my my rabbits enjoy digging their food out and wasting it.

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Re: Feeding Grains

Post Number:#2  Unread postby MaggieJ » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:09 am


Welcome to RabbitTalk, Hattie. :welcome:

Many people who feed their rabbits without commercial pellets use grain as part of their rabbits' more natural diet. I found grain was useful in small amounts, along with good hay free choice (alfalfa with some grass, here) and forage. Too much reliance on grain will make rabbits fat quickly and since much of that fat accumulates in the body cavity, it will interfere with the rabbit's health and reproduction. I've fed wheat, barley, and oats but usually only one at a time. It was most often wheat because I also fed it to the geese and they preferred it.

If you describe the full diet you feed your rabbits at present, we can help you arrive at a formula that works for you.

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Re: Feeding Grains

Post Number:#3  Unread postby Rainey » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:37 am


I second what Maggie said. Our meat mutts' diet is based on hay and willow (fresh when available and dried through the cold months) They get lots of fresh forage in the green time and some roots through the cold months. We feed some grain to nursing does and growing kits until freezer camp. We feed oats and wheat because that's what is available from our local feed store. Also feed some BOSS to does after kindling until kits come out of the nest box and some in really cold spells in winter. In winter we grow the wheat out into fodder so we have something fresh to feed when there is nothing to gather.
You'll get more helpful responses if you tell what you're feeding and what your goal is.
Welcome to RT--lots of good help available here.

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Re: Feeding Grains

Post Number:#4  Unread postby Dood » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:40 am


I mainly feed oats, barley and wheat (which they like the least) and offer BOSS to nursing does to help them maintain condition

I also sprout these grains and feed as fodder in the winter but I've not mastered this type of gardening yet so it's not a significant part of their diet - hopefully this winter I'll have better luck :)

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Re: Feeding Grains

Post Number:#5  Unread postby MeadowView » Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:46 pm


I don't feed grains (short of occasional oats as a treat/conditioner) but I do have so advice for rabbits digging out their food. If you can, place the food dish a little higher up so digging in their food is more difficult or awkward for them. If that doesn't work for you, try putting the "good stuff" in a separate dish or on top so they can eat it first.

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