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Newbie Tanning

Discussion of fur breeds, tanning pelts, using the furs, marketing.
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Re: Newbie Tanning

Post Number:#16  Unread postby bigfoot_158 » Thu Jul 07, 2016 3:04 pm


Zass wrote:
bigfoot_158 wrote:Alum is not tanning it is consider tawing. Technically, tawing is not tanning. Check out this link below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanning



It's try. The confusion seems to stem from people substituting the word "tanning" for "preservation."

Just because something isn't a tan, it doesn't mean it's an unacceptable method of hide preservation.
It really depends on the intended use for the finished product, and the environment it will be kept in.

From what I've researched, right up until chrome tanning became the industry standard sometime in the 1800's, fur pelts were generally preserved by non-tanning methods, such as tawing.




Zass I meant nothing bad about this way of preserving. As I have never tanned anything before. I just ran accrossed this info while I am in the process of researching. So I was just throwing the info out there. I think this way along with veggie and brain tanning are the safest methods for the people at home. Chrome tanning and battery acid may be the best way to tan but only for the pro's. As it produces hazardous waste.
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Re: Newbie Tanning

Post Number:#17  Unread postby Zass » Thu Jul 07, 2016 6:36 pm


bigfoot_158 wrote:
Zass wrote:
bigfoot_158 wrote:Alum is not tanning it is consider tawing. Technically, tawing is not tanning. Check out this link below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanning



It's try. The confusion seems to stem from people substituting the word "tanning" for "preservation."

Just because something isn't a tan, it doesn't mean it's an unacceptable method of hide preservation.
It really depends on the intended use for the finished product, and the environment it will be kept in.

From what I've researched, right up until chrome tanning became the industry standard sometime in the 1800's, fur pelts were generally preserved by non-tanning methods, such as tawing.




Zass I meant nothing bad about this way of preserving. As I have never tanned anything before. I just ran accrossed this info while I am in the process of researching. So I was just throwing the info out there. I think this way along with veggie and brain tanning are the safest methods for the people at home. Chrome tanning and battery acid may be the best way to tan but only for the pro's. As it produces hazardous waste.



Sorry if what I said sounded harsh. It wasn't intended to be. :) It's true that that non-tanning methods of preservation are often safer for home use. Syn-tans are another good option for safe home use. Most can be neutralized and disposed of down drains.

Battery acid isn't a tan either, it's just a pickle, which is only one step in a tanning process.

I don't really know anyone who uses chromium on a home basis, and I'd be really happy if people phased out battery acid altogether, as sulphuric acid is not more effective than many safer and less environmentally polluting acids. (it's a common contributor to acid rain.)
I tend to see it as a throwback pelt preservation method, left over from a time where people had less access to information than we have now.

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Re: Newbie Tanning

Post Number:#18  Unread postby bigfoot_158 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 3:42 am


No one mentions neutralizing Alum tawed hides. Does this need to be done? As this will be my first method tried. And what is the easiest and best way to make it moisture resistant?
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Re: Newbie Tanning

Post Number:#19  Unread postby SarniaTricia » Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:15 pm


Zass wrote:
cmfarm wrote:What exactly is involved in the stretching part?


I think breaking is where most people have the hardest time.

Simply defined, it's the process of pulling the leather fibers apart as it dries, so that it doesn't dry stiff. Note: AS it dries...not AFTER

Use whatever tools you have on hand and feel comfortable with. I find that the dull, rounded backs of my carpet knives make handy breaking tools. Thankfully, rabbit hides do not require anywhere near the force that deer hides do. Fryer hides can easily be broken by just pulling and working with your hands alone. For heavier leather, a lot of people use chair backs...or whatever other handy edge or corner is available to pull it over.
Hair off skins are often twisted, but that isn't recommended with fur.

The suppleness of your finished hide is entirely dependent on how well broken it is. It's not uncommon for me to re-wet and re-work a hide several times to get it to the desired suppleness. It can be tricky, because each portion of a skin (back, belly, neck etc.) will require slightly different amounts of force and will probably all be at different level of dryness.
Too dry and it can crack or rip, too wet and it simply will not break...

Here is a youtube video I found :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63Qt8BlfMac


As a newbie to curing my own pelts.... I let my pelts dry fully before I "broke" them...
Do I rehydrate with tap water and dry again, breaking as I dry?
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Re: Newbie Tanning

Post Number:#20  Unread postby SarniaTricia » Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:15 pm


Zass wrote:
cmfarm wrote:What exactly is involved in the stretching part?


I think breaking is where most people have the hardest time.

Simply defined, it's the process of pulling the leather fibers apart as it dries, so that it doesn't dry stiff. Note: AS it dries...not AFTER

Use whatever tools you have on hand and feel comfortable with. I find that the dull, rounded backs of my carpet knives make handy breaking tools. Thankfully, rabbit hides do not require anywhere near the force that deer hides do. Fryer hides can easily be broken by just pulling and working with your hands alone. For heavier leather, a lot of people use chair backs...or whatever other handy edge or corner is available to pull it over.
Hair off skins are often twisted, but that isn't recommended with fur.

The suppleness of your finished hide is entirely dependent on how well broken it is. It's not uncommon for me to re-wet and re-work a hide several times to get it to the desired suppleness. It can be tricky, because each portion of a skin (back, belly, neck etc.) will require slightly different amounts of force and will probably all be at different level of dryness.
Too dry and it can crack or rip, too wet and it simply will not break...

Here is a youtube video I found :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63Qt8BlfMac


As a newbie to curing my own pelts.... I let my pelts dry fully before I "broke" them...
Do I rehydrate with tap water and dry again, breaking as I dry?
thanks
Breeding Rabbits for Meat and Pelts...
Working towards a farm to raise animals with respect and care.

https://www.facebook.com/BABRabbits/

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Re: Newbie Tanning

Post Number:#21  Unread postby Zass » Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:52 pm


bigfoot_158 wrote:No one mentions neutralizing Alum tawed hides. Does this need to be done? As this will be my first method tried. And what is the easiest and best way to make it moisture resistant?


You wouldn't want to neutralize alum tawed hides, unless you were going to tan them afterwards.
For tawing, the alum(acid) has to remain in the leather to effectively preserve it.

The easiest way to create moisture resistance would probably be to buy a commercial spray that is designed for suede.

https://www.google.com/search?q=moister ... r&tbm=shop
They are fairly inexpensive, readily available, and easy to apply. The natural version involves smoking the leather.

__________ Mon Sep 26, 2016 3:48 pm __________

SarniaTricia wrote:
As a newbie to curing my own pelts.... I let my pelts dry fully before I "broke" them...
Do I rehydrate with tap water and dry again, breaking as I dry?
thanks


It depends on the method you used to tan them. Some methods, especially more natural ones like brains, might create a higher chance of slippage when the pelt is re-hydrated.

So long as the pelts have been thoroughly preserved with an alum taw, or syn tan, it should be fine to rehydrate and rebreak.
I'd suggest going ahead and giving it a try with your least valuable pelt first.

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