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Home made rabbit pellets.

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#16  Unread postby ohiogoatgirl » Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:21 am


$1,040 pellet machine, free shipping
cheapest I found. seem neat though. definitely would be interesting to get one and do like a coop with the local farmers. get everyone to go in on buying it and everyone use it to make their feed. then you'd be buying in everything bulk for it all and probably be real cheap.
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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#17  Unread postby WallTenter » Thu Jul 04, 2013 12:23 pm


I think when you factor in labor and electrical cost to produce a ton of pellets, you might be better off to buy your pellets custom milled at a local mill. :/ Just my .02.
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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#18  Unread postby grumpy » Thu Jul 04, 2013 9:34 pm


That...along with everything else...
has been put on hold for a while.

Dealt with far too much tragedy over the past year.
It's hard to keep a positive outlook on life
when you keep putting loved ones into the ground.

Doing my best just to keep excellent care of my rabbits and such.

Having bunches of babies though.! :)

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#19  Unread postby MrJacobTiffin » Mon Jan 30, 2017 1:07 pm


Did you ever figure out a good recipe. I found a cheaper machine too. http://www.flatdiepelletmill.com/produc ... -mill.html it says $900

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#20  Unread postby MaggieJ » Mon Jan 30, 2017 7:40 pm


I suppose if you are raising rabbits on a large scale, a pellet machine might pay off in the long run. For those raising rabbits on a small scale, for their own use and perhaps selling enough to offset costs, I think a natural diet of good hay, forage and perhaps fodder, plus small amounts of grain is likely more cost effective.

When I stopped feeding pellets and went to natural feeding, my cost per pound of meat-in-the-freezer (including maintenance of breeders) dropped from $1.50 to $0.75. There is NO MEAT here in Ontario that I can buy for that price and the quality of the naturally-fed meat was outstanding.

Just my conclusions from the years I raised rabbits. :)

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#21  Unread postby MrJacobTiffin » Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:08 am


some info i found on the internet

Nutrition for Rabbits
Rabbits are included in a family called Lagomorphs. Due to their unique digestive systems, rabbits require a diet that’s high in fiber, low in protein. The basic nutritional needs of rabbits are carbohydrates, proteins, fats, fiber, vitamins, minerals and water, thus the nucleus of any good rabbit diet consists of pellets, fresh hay, water, and fresh vegetables. Treats, such as fruits or prepared rabbit snacks, are acceptable but should be used very sparingly and in small quantities. It’s important for your rabbits’ health and longevity that you commit to feeding it a proper diet.
Rabbit feed pellets

rabbit feed pellets

Rabbit pellets are a food manufactured by the feed pellet mill and they provide a good array of vitamins and minerals for rabbits. On average, rabbits eat approximately 1 ounce of pellets per pound of body weight.
Rabbit pellets have long been considered the base of a rabbit’s diet. But pellets are actually more important in the younger stages of rabbit development than in adult rabbits. That’s because they are highly concentrated in nutrients, helping ensure proper weight gain in younger rabbits. As a rabbit reaches maturity, however, pellets should make up less of the diet- replaced with higher quantities of hay and vegetables. Overfeeding pellets in mature rabbits can lead to obesity, as well as other medical conditions.
Rabbits nutritional needs change throughout life! The nutritional needs of baby bunnies are much different than when they reach adulthood. Food should reflect and tailor to the changing nutritional needs of rabbits at their different life stages. A "one size fits all" style is definitely not the right approach to proper nutrition!

Feed Pellet Mill for Making Rabbit Pellets
If you plan to buy a feed pellet mill for making rabbit pellets, here is the basic information for making rabbit pellets. Hoping it is helpful.
A. Typical ingredients of rabbit pellets
Wheat, maize, sorghum, bran and pollard, hay and grass, Lucerne crumbles, vegetable protein meals, vegetable or animal oil, limestone, salt, choline chlorine, lysine, methionine, vitamin C, mould inhibitor, Riverina vitamin and mineral premix. Of course, the base raw materials may gradually change seasonally.
B. Which kind of feed pellet mill is suitable for making rabbit pellets?
Electric flat die feed pellet mill or diesel flat die feed pellet mill is appropriate for home use or small-scale production. If you are going to maker rabbit pellets in large quantity, ring die feed pellet mill is better.

The basic formulation of making rabbit pellets
The minimum rabbit nutrient requirements for a maintenance diet are 14% crude fiber, 2% fat, and crude protein 12%. Make sure that the feeds you are going to produce at least meet or better yet, exceed the above minimum amount of fiber, but keep protein and fat level low.
Fiber level of 15% to 17% is adequate. A level greater than 17% retards weight gain which would be desirable in a neutered pet rabbit and fiber levels of 22.5% and higher are used for reducing obesity and hairballs.
Protein levels should be 15% to 19%. Be sure the fiber level is greater than the protein level. Too high protein in the diet creates a greater amount of ammonia in the urine. It would be better to keep protein closer to 15%.
Fat levels should be low, around 3% or less. The higher the fat content of a pellet the worse it is for your bunny, because it can cause obesity. Avoid pellets with lots of nuts, seeds, etc. in it, they are not good to feed due to a high fat content.
Since we have known the machine and formulation of making rabbit pellets, don’t hesitate to act. The rabbits will really enjoy them.

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:02 am --

MaggieJ wrote:I suppose if you are raising rabbits on a large scale, a pellet machine might pay off in the long run. For those raising rabbits on a small scale, for their own use and perhaps selling enough to offset costs, I think a natural diet of good hay, forage and perhaps fodder, plus small amounts of grain is likely more cost effective.

When I stopped feeding pellets and went to natural feeding, my cost per pound of meat-in-the-freezer (including maintenance of breeders) dropped from $1.50 to $0.75. There is NO MEAT here in Ontario that I can buy for that price and the quality of the naturally-fed meat was outstanding.

Just my conclusions from the years I raised rabbits. :)



I would think a 50% reduction in feed cost. Would be worth it. I look at a pellet machine as a way to preserve the food. It helps take the water out of it because it heats up. Pellets can store for 3 months.

Would it be possible to create pellets out of natural food sources?

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:08 am --

I would have to dry them out. My 400 watt HPS does that prity good. I have been drying the manure with it.

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#22  Unread postby MaggieJ » Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:18 am


MrJacobTiffin wrote:some info i found on the internet


When you post quoted material from the Internet, you really should include the source. A link is helpful to others in trying to determine the credibility of the information. It is also considerate to credit the person who wrote it. (I know I get annoyed when I find my material posted elsewhere without credit given.)

In this case, the information about the pellet-making machine reads like an advertisement to encourage rabbit owners to buy expensive and unnecessary equipment. I believe you mentioned elsewhere that you raise rabbits in your basement. This likely means a fairly small number of rabbits. It is likely not to your advantage to invest hundreds of dollars in one of these machines.

There are many good brands of commercial pellets on the market. Many members feed these to their rabbits. Some of us, for a variety of reasons, prefer to feed whole, natural foods instead. We have a Natural Feeding for Rabbits forum where we discuss the best ways to go about this.

The nutritional information you quoted is not, in my opinion, entirely correct. It mentions feeding "larger quantities of hay and vegetables" to mature rabbits. Hay is excellent for rabbits and some vegetables can be fed, of course, but rabbits are herbivores, not vegetarians and a variety of safe grasses (often fed dried as hay), broad-leafed weeds, twigs and leaves are closer to the domestic rabbit's natural diet. Domestic rabbits are descended from European wild rabbits, which eat a wide variety of forage.

You might be best to hold off on such an expensive purchase at least until you gather more information and experience.

One last thing: Please add your location to your profile. Just the province or state is enough, or the country if it is not Canada or the United States. As Rainey pointed out, you will receive better feedback when we have a rough idea of where you live.

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#23  Unread postby MrJacobTiffin » Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:14 am


MaggieJ wrote:
MrJacobTiffin wrote:some info i found on the internet


When you post quoted material from the Internet, you really should include the source. A link is helpful to others in trying to determine the credibility of the information. It is also considerate to credit the person who wrote it. (I know I get annoyed when I find my material posted elsewhere without credit given.)

In this case, the information about the pellet-making machine reads like an advertisement to encourage rabbit owners to buy expensive and unnecessary equipment. I believe you mentioned elsewhere that you raise rabbits in your basement. This likely means a fairly small number of rabbits. It is likely not to your advantage to invest hundreds of dollars in one of these machines.

There are many good brands of commercial pellets on the market. Many members feed these to their rabbits. Some of us, for a variety of reasons, prefer to feed whole, natural foods instead. We have a Natural Feeding for Rabbits forum where we discuss the best ways to go about this.

The nutritional information you quoted is not, in my opinion, entirely correct. It mentions feeding "larger quantities of hay and vegetables" to mature rabbits. Hay is excellent for rabbits and some vegetables can be fed, of course, but rabbits are herbivores, not vegetarians and a variety of safe grasses (often fed dried as hay), broad-leafed weeds, twigs and leaves are closer to the domestic rabbit's natural diet. Domestic rabbits are descended from European wild rabbits, which eat a wide variety of forage.

You might be best to hold off on such an expensive purchase at least until you gather more information and experience.

One last thing: Please add your location to your profile. Just the province or state is enough, or the country if it is not Canada or the United States. As Rainey pointed out, you will receive better feedback when we have a rough idea of where you live.



http://www.feedpelletizer.com/applicati ... tizer.html Sorry your right

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:52 am --

Sorry new. Im learning as I go. I have 10 rabbits with a liter of kits born today. My rabbitry is growing fairly quickly. I know the number one cost is going to be feed. Im hoping to go commercial with my operation. I also posted that info to get your take on it. Honestly its quit confusing. I would like to sell a good feed as well. I believe you guys and girls are more knowledgeable them me. On the subject.

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:54 am --

I post on here to gain more knowledge I have learned that the best way to learn is dive in head first with Knowledgeable people.

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:56 am --

I would like to see maybe the best of both worlds merge into a good feed our multi feed. Maybe separate ingredients mild and mixed. I know most people want to know what they eat. I just dont know what im feeding my rabbits in these feed pellets.

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:08 am --

https://www.quora.com/Food-What-is-the- ... ore-if-any
Vegetarians make a conscious decision to not eat meat. An herbivore, on the other hand, is a type of animal that can only survive on plants.

Not sure were you were going this. It mentions feeding "larger quantities of hay and vegetables" to mature rabbits. Hay is excellent for rabbits and some vegetables can be fed, of course, but rabbits are herbivores, not vegetarians and a variety of safe grasses (often fed dried as hay), broad-leafed weeds, twigs and leaves are closer to the domestic rabbit's natural diet. Domestic rabbits are descended from European wild rabbits, which eat a wide variety of forage.

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:08 am --

Can you explain what they eat more in depth

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:10 am --

Also as far as my profile and were im from is personal. Sorry dont rely trust the internet.

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:13 am --

I am from Pa USA I've tried to update that but no Luke also tried to upload a photo no Luke.

-- Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:14 am --

Unless we are doing business no need for more info then that.

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#24  Unread postby macksmom98 » Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:56 am


I don't have advice about the other stuff, but as far as your location goes, its your choice to keep that private. It can be difficult for users to help you or give opinions/advice as much of our responses have to do with location, weather, and how things go in your area. I also like am fairly untrusting of the internet, but have opened up to this site more because of all the great people and the help they can provide.

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#25  Unread postby Nymphadora » Tue Jan 31, 2017 1:40 pm


MrJacobTiffin wrote:Vegetarians make a conscious decision to not eat meat. An herbivore, on the other hand, is a type of animal that can only survive on plants.

Not sure were you were going this.
...
Can you explain what they eat more in depth


I believe that what Maggie meant by the difference between vegetarians and herbivores is that vegetarians rely on the fruit or roots of the plant, whereas herbivores feed primarily on the greens (leaves, stems, etc.). In the wild, it would be more natural to see rabbits nibbling the tops of a carrot than digging down to eat the root. Therefore a diet that consists largely of vegetables would strike me as unusual, as well.

Personally, I am very careful about what personal information I put on the internet, as well, but this site has been fairly friendly, and as the others have mentioned, you get much better advice for your location even if you just put “Northeastern USA” in your profile. Best of luck in the rabbit business!

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#26  Unread postby akane » Thu Feb 02, 2017 7:31 pm


I was careful as a teenager and then facebook was born. Now most places I use for info my full name and city is there but then most places I am looking for people to interact with in person anyway. Not that I ever had much problem listing even my city. I mean who is going to find me with just a screen name and my city, state even in a small town? Unless you've got a big sprawling operation out back or have famously made the news pretty sure no one. Having my name show up on some things does make it more of a problem which is why I only post to closed groups on fb. Forums not connected to fb are unlikely to get you in any trouble unless like I said you have a big sprawling operation for someone to find and target. Unless you post a pic of your house not knowing your name, street, or house number is not going to get anyone very far. That would take a silly amount of effort even if it were possible.

Problem with making dry feed is the drying. You destroy nutrients and you have to have a certain amount of powdered ingredients to run them through a typical machine using a die. Quality is not going to increase much over what you can buy or put together with separate ingredients.
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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#27  Unread postby MrJacobTiffin » Thu Feb 09, 2017 11:25 am


What do you think about this recipe. Any suggestions welcome.

80% Alfalfa / Timothy Mix
20% = Wheat 49% / 49% Oats / 1% Pickling Salt / 1% Black Seed Sunflower Seed

Wheat or Barley have good protein levels. I was thinking those can both be used in feed. Oats have good protein levels too. I know they need some salt in there diet but not sure how much. Also I have read that 70% to 80% of there diet should be High in fiber. Black sunflower seeds are good for the coat and give a little more protein. Whats everyone think? I am not a expert! Just trying learn as I go. Open to some tweaking of the recipe

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#28  Unread postby alforddm » Thu Feb 09, 2017 11:37 am


Did you figure out the protein levels? I'm thinking with the alfalfa timothy mix your going to end up around 14% protein and the wheat and oat will probably be even lower. Your also probably going to be short on lysine. You might want to consider a mineral mix rather than pickling salt.

If you can post the protein for the alfalfa timothy mix I can calculate the protein of the whole mix for you. I'll also check and see, I maybe able to give you an answer on the lysine. Your sulfur amino acids will probably be ok but I'm just guessing.

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#29  Unread postby MrJacobTiffin » Fri Feb 10, 2017 10:35 am


http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/livest ... n-mix.html

I came across this post. In this post maggiej says: You could buy a bag of oats and a bag of barley and feed them 50/50. Barley is about 12% protein and oats are about 14%. O&itw mentions in his post : Barley is not near as common in the Midwest US as it is up in Canada. For all of you who want to use Maggies recipe... anyplace you read "barley", think "wheat". Wheat has almost the same exact nutrition as barely wheat has about 1% more protein) and rabbits like it.


https://www.unce.unr.edu/publications/f ... fs9323.pdf

From this source I got: Alfalfa As A Protein Source
Beef producers often use the term "high quality forage" to describe a high protein, low fiber feed. Table
1 shows the protein, energy, fiber and mineral content of various feeds commonly available to beef
producers. Early cut alfalfa (late bud, early bloom stage) may vary from 16 to 20% crude protein. Even
late cut alfalfa will contain 12 to 15% crude protein.

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While your lucerne hay will range in protein content from around 17% for early-cut to around 15% for late-cut, timothy sits around 11.5% for early cut, around 9% for mid-bloom (before its seed heads have fully formed) and just 5% for a late-season cut.


Can you tell me more about the mineral mix?

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Re: Home made rabbit pellets.

Post Number:#30  Unread postby alforddm » Fri Feb 10, 2017 3:14 pm


Using the average values provided by feedipedia.org and a mix of 60% timothy and 40% alfalfa your protein levels will be 14.66%

However, the alfalfa/timothy mix you can buy at tractor supply has a min protein level of only 12% so it could be lower or higher depending how it's mixed. Generally 15% is considered minimal for growing rabbits.

As far as the amino acids requirements, without knowing the composition of your alfalfa/timothy blend it's a bit hard to figure. But if I assume the mix above. I'm coming up with .46% on the sulfur amino acids and .57% for lysine. So your a bit deficient in those. You could boost the sulfur amino acids by adding more sunflower. Lysine is generally increased by adding soy. I honestly haven't look into other options if you don't use soy so I'm not sure what other feed items maybe high in lysine.

A mineral mix is just a common mix of minerals. It's sold as loose mineral at the feed store (our feed store calls it red and loos which I think maybe a corruption of red and loose but I really don't know). Or you can get the loose mineral that doesn't have as much salt. You could always just offer a mineral block or wheel.

From
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