24 Carrot Rabbitry

City-fied Self-Sufficiency

Hey there! Thanks for dropping by 24 Carrot Rabbitry
Take a look around and grab the RSS feed to stay updated. See you around!

Once the property was bush-hogged, and the driveway was bulldozed, it was time to get the land cleared.  The house, having been completed early, was already sitting on the dealer’s lot, and time was ticking on our loan offer.  We needed to work quickly.

We called the logger who had cleared some land farther down the road.  The wood had brought a nice amount of money for the landowner, so we hoped that this would be the case for us, as well.

As it turned out, the logger came and looked at our trees, and said that our trees were only good for pulp because of the large number of branches they had.  Unfortunately, the bottom had fallen out of the pulpwood market, and he was barely getting anything for it, he said, so it would cost us a decent bit to get it done.

Being pretty much at his mercy because of our situation, we agreed, adding some incentive for getting it done very quickly.

Logging day came, and we headed out to the property again.

When we arrived, they had already long since begun. They had loaded a truck and carried it off up the road.

Three large piles of branches greeted us at the back of the property. I could see a lot of burning in our future!

The two pines in the front yard still stood, and the logger would add to the piles left from the bulldozing.

He had already begun adding to the other bulldozed pile.

Mom walked among the trees still marked for removal. We had a little while to wait for the logger and his crew to return.

When they did return, we stayed at a safe distance! ILoveBunnies and Bunny-Wan Kenobi watched the tree-toppling with interest.

A crew member made the cut...

...And the logger used his Bobcat to push the tree over in the desired direction.

With the tree felled, it was time to cut off the branches. Great, more to add to the gigantic burn piles!

The logger lifted the trunks effortlessly with the claw-like device on his Bobcat.

The trunks were loaded onto a truck.

As all of this was going on, I noticed something about a very tall and beautiful pine we were going to keep. A large injury.

As I looked closer, I realized the tree had been girdled a long time ago. The coil of rusty barbed wire still sat next to the base of the tree. It was obvious that the tree had been trying to recover from this injury for a very long time, and had not had a lot of success. There was sap everywhere, and missing bark. I called my beloved Shay quickly. This tree had to come down... did he want me to see if I could get the logger to take it?

As I waited anxiously for Shay to call me back, the crew worked on grinding the final stumps and roots into the ground. Finally, I heard back from Shay, and ran out to the logger.

The logger asked what I would offer for him to take the giant pine. I had $100 in mind, but told him straight that I did not know what the job was worth, and that I would trust him to give me a fair price. He asked how $100 sounded, and we shook hands. The tree was coming down one way or another. It was $100 extra to the logger, $2,000 later to a professional tree remover after the house was up, or a storm. We picked the $100 option, and the logger himself made the cut, as it was going to be difficult to take it out without taking a lot of other trees down with it. We understood we would lose at least two.

He explained to me how the cuts worked. What he left uncut would act as a brake, pulling the tree to fall in that direction. It was fascinating to watch it fall exactly as he wanted it to. As it fell, its branches grabbed the other two trees we knew we would lose -- a maple and a pine -- and brought them down. Other trees lost limbs, but no other trees fell.

At the end of the day, we were left with a barren landscape. We were sad to take down all those lovely trees, but we knew our house would be safe.

The next step would be to decide again exactly where the house would go, as our markers were gone.  Then we could get the pad built, and the house set!

 

Both comments and pings are currently closed.

3 Responses to “Clearing the land for our house!”

  1. ladysown says:

    interesting indeed. did they grind the stumps or use the bulldozer to push them out??

    • Miss M says:

      They ground the stumps and roots. It was like a giant, truck-mounted, radial arm saw that they passed back and forth over the stump and then the roots. We stayed way back from that thing! It threw dirt and wood all over the place.

      The stump of the last tree — the big, sick pine — remains. Maybe we’ll carve something out of it. :)

  2. texascharm says:

    OMG .. I saw this post and nearly hyperventilated. We did this 3-4 years ago … I’ll have to re-live through you!